GALLERY: High school holds annual award ceremony

On Thursday June 5th, the high school students, faculty, and the awardee’s parents attended the annual academic and athletic awards. Many students were awarded for their efforts in the classroom and on the field. Special guests, such as Manchester and Essex selectmen, also attended the ceremony in order to give awards to students on behalf of different local organizations. The high school’s a Capella group, The SoundWaves, performed as well.

ACADEMIC AWARDS 2014

TOWN OF MANCHESTER SELECTMEN’S CITIZENSHIP AWARD: Evanthia Boling

TOWN OF ESSEX SELECTMEN’S CITIZENSHIP AWARD: Erik Rajunas

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIP: Erik Rajunas

SUPERINTENDENT’S AWARD: Lindsey Duff

MASSACHUSETTS ADMINISTRATORS ASSOCIATION STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT/LEADERSHIP AWARD: Julia Geswell

HERFF JONES PRINCIPAL’S AWARD: Julia Paccone

LIBRARIAN’S AWARD: Molly Carlson

BROWN UNIVERSITY BOOK AWARD: Lila Etter

CLARKSON UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: Patrick Byrne

CLARKSON UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIPAWARD: Parker Malarkey

CORNELL UNIVERSITY BOOK AWARD: Samuel Creighton

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE BOOK AWARD: Tucker Evans

HARVARD PRIZE BOOK AWARD: Hannah Riordan

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BOOK AWARD: Katherine Furber

SMITH COLLEGE BOOK AWARD: Kathryn Glidden

ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY BOOK AWARD: Natasha Statz-Geary

ST. MICHAEL’S COLLEGE BOOK AWARDS: Troy Ciarametaro, Abigail Martin

WELLESLEY COLLEGE BOOK AWARD: Alexandra Rice

YALE UNIVERSITY BOOK AWARD: Ariana Jackson

MAGOON BOWL AWARD: Hope Kincaid

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: Alyssa Shepard

JEWISH WAR VETERANS GOOD CITIZENSHIP: Maya Shnider

MASSACHUSETTS GIRLS STATE PROGRAM: Ariana Jackson, Hannah Riordan

MASSACHUSETTS BOYS STATE PROGRAM: Jack Hay, Parker Malarkey

MANCHESTER ESSEX SENIOR SCHOLARS: Madeline Dahlin, Rachel Daley, Fiona Davis,

Isadora Decker-Lucke, Lindsey Duff, Jeffrey Durkin, Rebecca Even, Jacob Freed, Courtney Kaner, Vanessa Kelley, Landon Komishane, Kendall McCormick, Taylor Meek, Peter Morton, Erik Rajunas, Alyssa Shepard, Alexander Taliaferro, Samantha Taylor

MANCHESTER ESSEX JUNIOR SCHOLARS: Nicholas Albertazzi, Benjamin Bichet, Patrick Byrne, Troy Ciarametaro, Samuel Creighton, Lila Etter, Tucker Evans, Katherine Furber, Kathryn Glidden, Bailey Graves, Cameron Holley, Ariana Jackson, Olivia Lantz, Parker Malarkey, Abigail Martin,

Lucas Martz, Alexandra Rice, Hannah Riordan, Natasha Statz-Geary

GREEN SCHOOLS GREEN DIFFERENCE AWARDS – Commitment to Greenovation: Justin Eichenberger, Cameron Holley; Project in Climate Resiliency: Kathryn Glidden, Abigail Martin, Natasha Statz-Geary; Project in Conservation: Madeleine Pomeroy; Green Student: Isabella Hickey, Sarah Reed

NATIONAL GREEN SCHOOLS SOCIETY: Rachel Daley, Jacob Tyler

PRESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL YOUTH AWARD: Ruby Aldrich, Meghan Conway,

Lauren Coogan, Molly Crehan, Rachel Daley, Justin Eichenberger, Kathryn Glidden, Isabella Hickey, Cameron Holley, Kristen Kaneb, Samuel Koufman, Olivia Lantz, Abigail Martin, Jacqueline Otterbein, Sarah Reed, Natasha Statz-Geary, Hannah Thorne, Jacob Tyler

GREEN SCHOOLS AMBASSADOR: Ruby Aldrich, Meghan Conway, Lauren Coogan, Molly Crehan, Rachel Daley, Justin Eichenberger, Kathryn Glidden, Cameron Holley, Kristen Kaneb, Samuel Koufman, Olivia Lantz, Abigail Martin, Christiane Noriega, Jacqueline Otterbein, Sarah Reed, Natasha Statz-Geary, Hannah Thorne, Jacob Tyler

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN GREEN INTERNS:  David LaForge, Eden Silag Stearns

EXCELLENCE IN THE VISUAL ARTS FOR MIXED MEDIA: Hannah Thorne

STEIGLITZ SPIRIT OF FINE ARTS: Madeline Shaw

EXCELLENCE IN THE VISUAL ARTS FOR FINE ARTS: Sarah Lewiecki, Julia Paccone

JAMES NACHTWEY SPIRIT OF PHOTOJOURNALISM: Athena Venetsenakos

EXCELLENCE IN PHOTOJOURNALISM: Phoebe Schwartz

ANDREAS GURSKY SPIRIT OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Annie Alfano

EXCELLENCE IN THE VISUAL ARTS FOR PHOTOGRAPHY: Molly McKeon

GRAPHIC DESIGN SPIRIT AWARD: Ainsley McLaughlin

EXCELLENCE IN THE VISUAL ARTS FOR CERAMICS: Molly Crehan

EXCELLENCE IN THE VISUAL ARTS FOR PRINTMAKING:  Devon Musgrave-Johnson

NATIONAL CHORAL AWARD: Lindsey Duff, Tucker Evans

CHORAL DIRECTOR’S AWARD: Evanthia Boling

OUTSTANDING MUSICIANSHIP AWARD: Nikolas Janowicz

BAND DIRECTOR’S AWARD: Rachael Gallagher

WOODY HERMAN JAZZ: Campbell Fackre

JOHN PHILLIP SOUSA BAND: Jeffrey Durkin

 

LOUIS ARMSTRONG JAZZ: Dylan McClure

EXCELLENCE IN WORLD HISTORY II: Jillian Furber, Julia Prezesiek

EXCELLENCE IN US HISTORY I: Jennifer Cochand, Kara Hersey

EXCELLENCE IN US HISTORYII:  Lila Etter, Jackson Haskell

EXCELLENCE IN US GOVERNMENT: Jeffrey Durkin

EXCELLENCE IN GLOBAL ISSUES: Elizabeth Higgins, Taylor Meek

EXCELLENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY: Adrienne Young

EXCELLENCE IN AP PSYCHOLOGY: Molly Carlson

EXCELLENCE IN AP US HISTORY: Tucker Evans

EXCELLENCE IN AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT: Fiona Davis

EXCELLENCE IN THE GARDNER PROJECT: Peter Cottingham, Alyssa Shepard

EXCELLENCE IN DEBATE: Zachary Even, John Hay, Meehan Irose, Landon Komishane,

ENGLISH EXCELLENCE 9: Jillian Furber

ENGLISH EXCELLENCE 10: Zachary Even

ENGLISH EXCELLENCE 11: Hannah Riordan

ENGLISH EXCELLENCE 12: Lindsey Duff

HERBERT HAHN MEMORIAL BOOK: Tucker Evans

WINDHOVER FOR EXCELLENCE IN WRITING: Tasha Statz-Geary

THE INDEPENDENT MOST VALUABLE STAFFER: Fiona Davis, Kendall McCormick

THE ROBERT MCCAMMON PRIZE: Caisi Calandra

MOST IMPROVED ENGLISH 9: Evan Williams

MOST IMPROVED ENGLISH 10: Devin Depaolis

MOST IMPROVED ENGLISH 11: Jackson Haskell

MOST IMPROVED ENGLISH 12: John Bruce

THEATER PERFORMANCE: Neil Henry, Charles Hoff

FRENCH II EXCELLENCE: Madeleine Conway

FRENCH III EXCELLENCE: Charlotte Freed

FRENCH IV AP EXCELLENCE: Ariana Jackson

FRENCH V EXCELLENCE: Jeffrey Durkin

SPANISH II EXCELLENCE: Genevieve Duff

SPANISH III EXCELLENCE: Zachary Even

SPANISH IV EXCELLENCE: Samuel Creighton

SPANISH IV AP EXCELLENCE: Tucker Evans

SPANISH V EXCELLENCE: Peter Morton

SPANISH V AP LITERATURE EXCELLENCE: Madeline Dahlin

THE DAVID DOOLEY LANGUAGE AWARD: Carly Tofuri

THE NICOLE SHERF STUDENT LINGUIST AWARD: Courtney Kaner

THE VIRGINIA MACDONALD FOREIGN LANGUAGE AWARD: Lindsey Duff

THE RENSSELAER MEDAL: Samuel Creighton

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN QUANTITATIVE REASONING: Alyssa Shepard,

Adrienne Young

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN ALGEBRA I: Amber Paré

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN ALGEBRA II: Jennifer Cochand

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN CALCULUS: Lindsey Duff

GEOMETRY EXCELLENCE: Jillian Furber

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN PRE CALCULUS: Samuel Creighton, Tucker Evans

MOST VALUABLE MATHLETE:  Dylan McClure

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MARKETING: Christopher McAuliff , David Reid

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: Breanna Arnold

2014 ICDC DECA AWARD (1ST PLACE WRITTEN EXAM) – Alexandra Leventis

2014 ICDC DECA AWARD (1ST PLACE ROLE PLAY) – Breanna Arnold

2014 ICDC DECA AwardS – Christopher Carr, Troy Ciarametaro, John Hennigan, Devon Towle

PHYSICS FIRST (9TH GRADE):Madeleine Conway

EXCELLENCE IN GRADE 10 BIOLOGY:Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon, Benjamin Wolsieffer

HIGHEST CUMULATIVE AVERAGE IN CHEMISTRY:Tucker Evans

HIGHEST ACHIEVEMENT IN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY:  Michael Loebelenz

HONORS PHYSICS:Lindsey Duff

AP BIOLOGY EXCELLENCE:Tucker Evans

AP PHYSICS ACHIEVEMENT: Vanessa Kelley

BAUSCH & LOMB HONORARY SCIENCE AWARD:Leonardo Gallo

ROBOTICS ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS: Samuel Creighton, Dylan McClure, Benjamin Wolsieffer

 

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Geometry class solves Rubik’s Cubes

Math teacher David Alger teaches geometry students the process of solving the Rubik’s Cube. The Rubik’s Cube was invented in 1974 by Erno Rubik, who was a Hungarian inventor.  The solution involves problem solving, which is one component of the geometry curriculum.

Students in math teacher David Alger’s B block geometry class work on solving Rubik’s Cubes over the course of a couple of weeks.  For part of the geometry classes’ final exam, students must be able to quickly solve the Rubik’s Cube with or without a guide. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in math teacher David Alger’s B block geometry class work on solving Rubik’s Cubes over the course of a couple of weeks. For part of the geometry classes’ final exam, students must be able to quickly solve the Rubik’s Cube with or without a guide. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before learning to solve the Rubik’s Cubes, the students took them apart to understand how they work.  After completely disassembling the cubes, the students put them back together and began solving them.  Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before learning to solve the Rubik’s Cubes, the students took them apart to understand how they work. After completely disassembling the cubes, the students put them back together and began solving them. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Courtney Holley and Zoe Brown work on completing the solution. Students use their phones as a timer so they can be aware of their progress. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Courtney Holley and Zoe Brown work on completing the solution. Students use their phones as a timer so they can be aware of their progress. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Caitlin Malloy is advised by math teacher David Alger on how to accomplish a certain step in the process of solving the Rubik’s Cube. Alger provides assistance at the front of the class if students require help. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Caitlin Malloy is advised by math teacher David Alger on how to accomplish a certain step in the process of solving the Rubik’s Cube. Alger provides assistance at the front of the class if students require help. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Zanny Lee and sophomore Erin Carlson practice solving the cube. The guide for solving the cube contains step by step instruction for each face of the cube. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Zanny Lee and sophomore Erin Carlson practice solving the cube. The guide for solving the cube contains step by step instruction for each face of the cube. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore William Deschenes completes the steps of the Rubik’s Cube. Deschenes has practiced solving the cube outside of the classroom and has improved his speed by memorizing each phase of the process. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore William Deschenes completes the steps of the Rubik’s Cube. Deschenes has practiced solving the cube outside of the classroom and has improved his speed by memorizing each phase of the process. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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High school art displayed in annual art show

Throughout the year, high school students in all art classes worked on various projects.  The students picked a couple of their pieces to exhibit in the art show.  These include photographs, paintings, drawings, ceramics, sculptures, and mixed media.

Throughout the year, high school students in all art classes worked on various projects.  The students picked a couple of their pieces to exhibit in the art show.  These include photographs, paintings, drawings, ceramics, sculptures, and mixed media.
Throughout the year, high school students in all art classes worked on various projects. The students picked a couple of their pieces to exhibit in the art show. These include photographs, paintings, drawings, ceramics, sculptures, and mixed media.
Students in ceramics teacher Tamera Burns’s class picked some of their work to show.  The display consists of wheel thrown pieces, coil pots, hand built tiles, and sgraffito.  Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in ceramics teacher Tamera Burns’s class picked some of their work to show. The display consists of wheel thrown pieces, coil pots, hand built tiles, and sgraffito. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Ainsley McLaughlin observes the art pieces. Pieces of art work consisting of boxes that reflected something on the inside of them. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Ainsley McLaughlin observes the art pieces. Pieces of art work consisting of boxes that reflected something on the inside of them. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Drawing classes display their artwork of skeletons. Drawing classes, as well as graphic design classes, are taught by art teacher Marion Powers. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Drawing classes display their artwork of skeletons. Drawing classes, as well as graphic design classes, are taught by art teacher Marion Powers. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Laura Fitzgerald and Phoebe Savje stop in the hall in order to look at the displayed art.  Students are able to see the artwork as they travel in between classes. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Laura Fitzgerald and Phoebe Savje stop in the hall in order to look at the displayed art. Students are able to see the artwork as they travel in between classes. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in the Drawing classes, taught by art teacher Marion Powers, drew portraits of Malala Yousafzai.  Malala publicly stood up for girls’ education and was shot by the Taliban.  The students used various words in different languages of their choice in order to create the image. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in the Drawing classes, taught by art teacher Marion Powers, drew portraits of Malala Yousafzai. Malala publicly stood up for girls’ education and was shot by the Taliban. The students used various words in different languages of their choice in order to create the image. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Julia Paccone created a collection of paintings in her AP Studio Art class.  Paccone used spoons as a central subject for all of her paintings in the portfolio. Credit:  Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Julia Paccone created a collection of paintings in her AP Studio Art class. Paccone used spoons as a central subject for all of her paintings in the portfolio. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students who participated in painting and drawing classes, taught by Marion Powers, display their projects on painted book covers.   The drawings correspond to the contents of the book. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students who participated in painting and drawing classes, taught by Marion Powers, display their projects on painted book covers. The drawings correspond to the contents of the book. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On some of the boards, photographs taken by students in Photo I, Photo II, Photo III, and Photo Portfolio are displayed.  There are also artworks made by students in graphic design and mixed media.  Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On some of the boards, photographs taken by students in Photo I, Photo II, Photo III, and Photo Portfolio are displayed. There are also artworks made by students in graphic design and mixed media. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Amber Pare studies senior Julia Paccone’s portrait. Paccone layered different papers together to create a self-portrait. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Amber Pare studies senior Julia Paccone’s portrait. Paccone layered different papers together to create a self-portrait. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Senior portfolio student Sarah Lewiecki created portraits of her and her brother, Senior Ian Lewiecki. Lewiecki did this by painting different colored and sized circles. Credit:  Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior portfolio student Sarah Lewiecki created portraits of her and her brother, Senior Ian Lewiecki. Lewiecki did this by painting different colored and sized circles. Credit: Susie Buck and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Middle school students shine in “Wizard of Oz”

The YMCA of the North Shore directed a middle school production of the “Wizard of Oz.”  Middle school students acted and helped with music, lights, and backstage responsibly.  The play was performed on May 23rd, 24th, 25th.

Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Charlotte Hoff performs as the character Dorothy Gale with her dog Toto played by Liz Staid. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Charlotte Hoff performs as the character Dorothy Gale with her dog Toto played by Liz Staid. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Mia Cromwell and seventh grader Kendall Hersey play Dorothy’s guardians, Aunty Em and Uncle Henry.  Eighth grader Heather Holley portrays Miss Gulch.  Holley also plays the Wicked Witch of the West. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Mia Cromwell and seventh grader Kendall Hersey play Dorothy’s guardians, Aunty Em and Uncle Henry. Eighth grader Heather Holley portrays Miss Gulch. Holley also plays the Wicked Witch of the West. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Glinda, played by sixth grader Paige Mandia, greets Dorothy for the first time as they are surrounded by Munchkins who are played by various middle school students. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Glinda, played by sixth grader Paige Mandia, greets Dorothy for the first time as they are surrounded by Munchkins who are played by various middle school students. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Sixth grader Whitney Johnson plays the scarecrow, as well as the character Hunk on the farm in Kansas. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Whitney Johnson plays the scarecrow, as well as the character Hunk on the farm in Kansas. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Julia Kaper portrays the Tin Man as well as Hickory, one of the farmers. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Julia Kaper portrays the Tin Man as well as Hickory, one of the farmers. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Holley, playing the Wicked Witch of the West, threatens the Tin Man as they are surrounded by apple-throwing trees. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Holley, playing the Wicked Witch of the West, threatens the Tin Man as they are surrounded by apple-throwing trees. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, and Tin Man meet the Cowardly Lion who is played by seventh grader Jake D’Ambrosio.  D’Ambrosio also plays a man on Dorothy’s family farm named Zeke. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, and Tin Man meet the Cowardly Lion who is played by seventh grader Jake D’Ambrosio. D’Ambrosio also plays a man on Dorothy’s family farm named Zeke. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Wicked Witch of the West cast a spell that gave the poppy flowers the power to put all of the characters to sleep. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Wicked Witch of the West cast a spell that gave the poppy flowers the power to put all of the characters to sleep. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before seeing the Wizard of Oz, the people of Oz help to make over the Tin Man, Dorothy, and the Cowardly Lion. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before seeing the Wizard of Oz, the people of Oz help to make over the Tin Man, Dorothy, and the Cowardly Lion. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
D’Ambrosio gives a speech as the Cowardly Lion about how important courage is. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
D’Ambrosio gives a speech as the Cowardly Lion about how important courage is. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school students held umbrellas, lights, foam tubes, and foam hands in order to create the image of the Great and Powerful Oz. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school students held umbrellas, lights, foam tubes, and foam hands in order to create the image of the Great and Powerful Oz. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dorothy tells Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion, and Scarecrow that she must go home to Kansas. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dorothy tells Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion, and Scarecrow that she must go home to Kansas. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh Grade Engineering Class Launches Bottle Rockets

Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx instructs the annual bottle rocket project with his seventh grade classes.  The students collected plastic bottles and transformed them into rockets by adding wings and tops.  The seventh graders then launched their bottles and recorded the data.

Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx draws examples of good and bad wing types for the students’ rockets.  Bannister-Marx explains that large, jagged wings are not as aerodynamic as small, straight ones. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx draws examples of good and bad wing types for the students’ rockets. Bannister-Marx explains that large, jagged wings are not as aerodynamic as small, straight ones. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Jack Julien glue extra parts to their bottle in order to make it more durable.  Schwartz hot glues a piece of Styrofoam intending for it to be attached to the side of the rocket while Julien glues half of a foam football on top of the bottle. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Jack Julien glue extra parts to their bottle in order to make it more durable. Schwartz hot glues a piece of Styrofoam intending for it to be attached to the side of the rocket while Julien glues half of a foam football on top of the bottle. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students draw diagrams of what they want their bottle rockets to look like.  They use tennis balls and foam cones to protect the top of their bottle when it hits the ground after launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students draw diagrams of what they want their bottle rockets to look like. They use tennis balls and foam cones to protect the top of their bottle when it hits the ground after launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grader John Crehan researches effective bottle rockets.  The students were required to look up various types in order to figure out the most aerodynamic and durable kind of rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader John Crehan researches effective bottle rockets. The students were required to look up various types in order to figure out the most aerodynamic and durable kind of rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Many students cut tennis balls in half using a miniature hand saw and a clamp attached to the side of a table to hold it in place.  The seventh graders then attached them to the end of their rockets so that there would be less damage upon impact. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Many students cut tennis balls in half using a miniature hand saw and a clamp attached to the side of a table to hold it in place. The seventh graders then attached them to the end of their rockets so that there would be less damage upon impact. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A couple of days before the project began, students collected both 1 and 2 liter soda and seltzer bottles.  Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A couple of days before the project began, students collected both 1 and 2 liter soda and seltzer bottles. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the class waits on the sidelines as a team launches their rocket.  The students were responsible for measuring the angle of the rocket at its maximum height and the distance away from the launch pad in order to find the height that it flew. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the class waits on the sidelines as a team launches their rocket. The students were responsible for measuring the angle of the rocket at its maximum height and the distance away from the launch pad in order to find the height that it flew. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Emma Cochand and Clara Davis fix the broken wings of their rocket using duct tape before their initial launch.  Bannister-Marx assigned partnerships for this project who worked on their bottles for a few days before launching. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Emma Cochand and Clara Davis fix the broken wings of their rocket using duct tape before their initial launch. Bannister-Marx assigned partnerships for this project who worked on their bottles for a few days before launching. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Banister-Marx holds the base of the pump steady so the pressure of the water doesn’t move the base. The pump uses 80 units of water pressure to launch each rocket into the air. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Banister-Marx holds the base of the pump steady so the pressure of the water doesn’t move the base. The pump uses 80 units of water pressure to launch each rocket into the air. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Schwartz repairs his rocket after his group’s firs launch using duct tape to keep the wings intact. Each group were given sufficient time before each launch to prepare their rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Schwartz repairs his rocket after his group’s firs launch using duct tape to keep the wings intact. Each group were given sufficient time before each launch to prepare their rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Ike Maloney records the height and distance of another team’s rocket as he prepares to launch his own rocket.  There were always one or two teams getting their rockets ready for flight as one team launches and the other teams wait on the sidelines. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Ike Maloney records the height and distance of another team’s rocket as he prepares to launch his own rocket. There were always one or two teams getting their rockets ready for flight as one team launches and the other teams wait on the sidelines. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before each launch, students filled their bottles about half way with water using funnels to not spill any water on the turf. The more pressure pumped into the rocket, the higher it will fly. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before each launch, students filled their bottles about half way with water using funnels to not spill any water on the turf. The more pressure pumped into the rocket, the higher it will fly. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While one student pumps the water pressure into the rocket, the other student prepares to pull the string over their head to initiate the launch. This is the reason why Bannister-Marx split the groups into two, so that each student would have a role in the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While one student pumps the water pressure into the rocket, the other student prepares to pull the string over their head to initiate the launch. This is the reason why Bannister-Marx split the groups into two, so that each student would have a role in the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Libby Graves pumps 80 units of pressure into the rocket. Graves and Bannister-Marx wear protective goggles in case anything goes wrong during the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Libby Graves pumps 80 units of pressure into the rocket. Graves and Bannister-Marx wear protective goggles in case anything goes wrong during the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students typically used small, pointed wings to increase stability and height of their rockets.  They also used foam cones and tennis balls in order to make the bottles durable enough to endure multiple flights. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students typically used small, pointed wings to increase stability and height of their rockets. They also used foam cones and tennis balls in order to make the bottles durable enough to endure multiple flights. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

After all of the teams launched their rockets twice, the students returned to the classroom and recorded the data of their best launch on the white board.  This was in order to compare the teams’ results to see whose rockets flew the highest. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After all of the teams launched their rockets twice, the students returned to the classroom and recorded the data of their best launch on the white board. This was in order to compare the teams’ results to see whose rockets flew the highest. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Pulse and blood pressure lab in sophomore bio

Biology teacher Erica Everett’s tenth grade class did a lab to find their pulses and blood pressure.  Students measured these aspects before and after exercising in order to observe how the pumping of the heart increases after exerting energy.

Teacher assistant Amanda Maddox explains to sophomores Nick DiPietro and Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon how to work the machine that calculates blood pressure.  Some of the machines also are capable of finding the pulse, but most students simply found their pulse in a vein on their wrist and counted the beats for thirty seconds, which they then multiplied by two, to find the beats per minute. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Teacher assistant Amanda Maddox explains to sophomores Nick DiPietro and Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon how to work the machine that calculates blood pressure. Some of the machines also are capable of finding the pulse, but most students simply found their pulse in a vein on their wrist and counted the beats for thirty seconds, which they then multiplied by two, to find the beats per minute. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Sabrina Pallazola assists sophomore Sydney Christopher with finding her blood pressure.   The students are seated in groups of two, so they always do labs with their table partner. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Sabrina Pallazola assists sophomore Sydney Christopher with finding her blood pressure. The students are seated in groups of two, so they always do labs with their table partner. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Courtney Fraser writes down her blood pressure and pulse on a worksheet.  Students record their own information as well as that of two other students in order to compare their individual blood pressure and pulse. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Courtney Fraser writes down her blood pressure and pulse on a worksheet. Students record their own information as well as that of two other students in order to compare their individual blood pressure and pulse. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Chris DiFluri does push-ups in order to increase his pulse and blood pressure.  The biology students performed different physical activities then recorded their pulse and blood pressure directly after exercising so that they can compare how the aspects change because of exercise. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Chris DiFluri does push-ups in order to increase his pulse and blood pressure. The biology students performed different physical activities then recorded their pulse and blood pressure directly after exercising so that they can compare how the aspects change because of exercise. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Liam Crossen and Hannah White run down the third floor hallway to increase their blood pressure and pulse.  Other students did this by performing other physical activities such as push-ups and jumping jacks. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Liam Crossen and Hannah White run down the third floor hallway to increase their blood pressure and pulse. Other students did this by performing other physical activities such as push-ups and jumping jacks. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomores Alex Buck and David Reid observe a model of a lung as they read along with a textbook.  The students studied how the respiratory systems work as well as other systems such as the circulatory and excretory systems. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Alex Buck and David Reid observe a model of a lung as they read along with a textbook. The students studied how the respiratory systems work as well as other systems such as the circulatory and excretory systems. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Visiting a Capella groups perform for school

MERHS a Capella group, the Soundwaves, hosted a Capella Night. Pingree’s Spectrum Highlights, Hamilton-Wenham’s Kings of the Beach, and Gordon College’s Scotsmen came to the high school to perform. Each group sang covers of multiple songs throughout the night. Different members of the Soundwaves hosted the a Capella groups, which entailed showing them around the school and making sure everything was on schedule for their performance.

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High school students work on ceramics

Students in Ceramics II, Ceramics III, and Ceramics Honors Portfolio work with ceramics teacher Tamera Burns to mold and paint clay into different structures.  The high school students are creating tea cups, vases, and slabs.

Freshman Bridgett Kiernan uses a graphing triangle to measure the length and width of her clay slab.  Kiernan is planning on decorating the slab with repeating units for her assignment.  Repeated units are pieces of clay that are constructed in the same shape and are repetitively placed on the clay slab. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Bridgett Kiernan uses a graphing triangle to measure the length and width of her clay slab. Kiernan is planning on decorating the slab with repeating units for her assignment. Repeated units are pieces of clay that are constructed in the same shape and are repetitively placed on the clay slab. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Molly Crehan, who is in Ceramics III, decorates her smoothed coil pot with underglaze.  Underglaze is used to paint fine details on different sized pieces. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Molly Crehan, who is in Ceramics III, decorates her smoothed coil pot with underglaze. Underglaze is used to paint fine details on different sized pieces. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore  Cassandra Gonser, junior Sam Woodman, freshman Evelyn Lantz, and junior Jason Conrad work at the wheels to create tea cups.  The cups must be more than 5 inches and must be made on the wheel in order to fulfill the assignment correctly. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore
Cassandra Gonser, junior Sam Woodman, freshman Evelyn Lantz, and junior Jason Conrad work at the wheels to create tea cups. The cups must be more than 5 inches and must be made on the wheel in order to fulfill the assignment correctly. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Olivia Tyler rolls a piece of clay in order to create her repeated unit project.  Tyler is going to attach her repeated units onto a clay dome for her assignment. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Olivia Tyler rolls a piece of clay in order to create her repeated unit project. Tyler is going to attach her repeated units onto a clay dome for her assignment. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Ceramics teacher Tamera Burns assists Cole Neugebauer and Sophia Guerriero with their projects.  Neugebauer bucket glazes the tea pot that he has created in this class.  Bucket glazing is when one wants to completely cover his or her piece with one color.  Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Ceramics teacher Tamera Burns assists Cole Neugebauer and Sophia Guerriero with their projects. Neugebauer bucket glazes the tea pot that he has created in this class. Bucket glazing is when one wants to completely cover his or her piece with one color. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Junior Sam Woodman uses the wheel to construct a tea cup.  Woodman uses water and her hands as the wheel spins to center the clay in order to correctly construct her piece. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Sam Woodman uses the wheel to construct a tea cup. Woodman uses water and her hands as the wheel spins to center the clay in order to correctly construct her piece. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Sophomores Talk About Honesty in Advisory

Sophomore classes discuss admirable and bad qualities of character in advisory.  Led by their advisors, the students talk about the importance of honesty.  Over the past week sophomores were assigned to do at least three acts of kindness, and their actions were discussed in the

Sophomores Erin Carlson, Caisi Calandra, Julia Camille, and Henry Rohner listen to advisor Tamera Burns as she talks about the importance of honesty.  Burns discusses how lying can affect yourself and others. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Erin Carlson, Caisi Calandra, Julia Camille, and Henry Rohner listen to advisor Tamera Burns as she talks about the importance of honesty. Burns discusses how lying can affect yourself and others. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Carlson, Calandra, and Camille write their answers to a prompt about honesty given to the advisory group.  This prompt concerns the moral dilemma of a man who is unsure whether to tell a girl whom he went on a date with that he will call her; even though he knows that he will not. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Carlson, Calandra, and Camille write their answers to a prompt about honesty given to the advisory group. This prompt concerns the moral dilemma of a man who is unsure whether to tell a girl whom he went on a date with that he will call her; even though he knows that he will not. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Henry Rohner, Jack Hennigan, and George Lantz discuss their answers to the journal entries.  They talk about what they would say in the man’s situation given in the prompt and why. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Henry Rohner, Jack Hennigan, and George Lantz discuss their answers to the journal entries. They talk about what they would say in the man’s situation given in the prompt and why. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Josh Ward listens to advisor Tamera Burns as she speaks more about honesty after the students finish discussing the answers to their journal prompt.  Burns talks about how being honest makes one feel compared to how lying makes one feel. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Josh Ward listens to advisor Tamera Burns as she speaks more about honesty after the students finish discussing the answers to their journal prompt. Burns talks about how being honest makes one feel compared to how lying makes one feel. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Advisor Liz Edgerton discusses with the sophomore advisory what qualities make a good person. The advisory also addressed the qualities a person would find in a good or bad friend. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Advisor Liz Edgerton discusses with the sophomore advisory what qualities make a good person. The advisory also addressed the qualities a person would find in a good or bad friend. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ben Schlegel explains his random act of kindness in the past week. Schlegel worked on helping his younger siblings, while other students in the advisory helped their friends through situations. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ben Schlegel explains his random act of kindness in the past week. Schlegel worked on helping his younger siblings, while other students in the advisory helped their friends through situations. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Connor Senay reads the paper that is given to the advisory. The worksheet consisted of questions which provoked the students to consider their actions in certain situations such as finding 200 dollars on the street. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Connor Senay reads the paper that is given to the advisory. The worksheet consisted of questions which provoked the students to consider their actions in certain situations such as finding 200 dollars on the street. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

advisory group.

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Joel Levine Gives Substance Abuse Presentation

On Wednesday March 26th, Joel Levine visited MERSD to give a talk about his former drug and alcohol addiction to students, parents, and faculty. Joel’s sister, MERHS physical education teacher and athletic trainer Jillian Levine, and his father, Herb Levine, accompanied Joel during the presentation in order to give their support and to share their personal experiences with Joel’s addiction.

A crowd made up of students, parents, and teachers attended the presentation. Joel Levine discussed how he now has an allergy to drugs and alcohol called the “Phenomenon of Craving”. Even with withdrawal symptoms sometimes creeping up on him he gets through it. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A crowd made up of students, parents, and teachers attended the presentation. Joel Levine discussed how he now has an allergy to drugs and alcohol called the “Phenomenon of Craving”. Even with withdrawal symptoms sometimes creeping up on him he gets through it. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

As a part of Joel Levine’s video, his younger sister Jillian was interviewed about what she went through because of her brother’s addiction.  Jillian Levine is an athletic trainer and physical education teacher for MERSD.  Jillian talked about how she knew about her older brother’s problem, yet she was too scared to tell anyone about it. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As a part of Joel Levine’s video, his younger sister Jillian was interviewed about what she went through because of her brother’s addiction. Jillian Levine is an athletic trainer and physical education teacher for MERSD. Jillian talked about how she knew about her older brother’s problem, yet she was too scared to tell anyone about it. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
When Joel Levine first became sober, a doctor helped him and his family create a video telling his story, which was shown to the audience during this presentation.  After his parents found out about his drug problem, Joel had to be frequently drug tested and had to take withdrawal medication.  This medication was given to him by his mother who made sure that he swallowed it after every dose. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
When Joel Levine first became sober, a doctor helped him and his family create a video telling his story, which was shown to the audience during this presentation. After his parents found out about his drug problem, Joel had to be frequently drug tested and had to take withdrawal medication. This medication was given to him by his mother who made sure that he swallowed it after every dose. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During Joel Levine’s presentation, his father Herb periodically took the microphone and added in his opinion to Joel’s story.  Herb told about how he and his wife noticed his son’s behavioral and physical changes as Joel became more involved with illegal substances. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During Joel Levine’s presentation, his father Herb periodically took the microphone and added in his opinion to Joel’s story. Herb told about how he and his wife noticed his son’s behavioral and physical changes as Joel became more involved with illegal substances. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Joel Levine took the stage and further discussed his perspective of his drug addiction. Joel went to Endicott College and had a .71 GPA due to skipping almost all of his classes.  Joel spoke about how he lost countless friends because of his drug and alcohol problem. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Joel Levine took the stage and further discussed his perspective of his drug addiction. Joel went to Endicott College and had a .71 GPA due to skipping almost all of his classes. Joel spoke about how he lost countless friends because of his drug and alcohol problem. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Police officers from Manchester and Essex listen while Herb Levine presents the different circumstances both him and his family had to overcome while overcoming the drug addiction of Joel Levine. After the assembly when the Levine’s were accepting questions the officer asked, “Could you speak about the transition from marijuana to other drugs? I do believe that marijuana is a gateway drug”. The Levine’s then shared their opinion in which they agreed with the officer. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Police officers from Manchester and Essex listen while Herb Levine presents the different circumstances both him and his family had to overcome while overcoming the drug addiction of Joel Levine. After the assembly when the Levine’s were accepting questions the officer asked, “Could you speak about the transition from marijuana to other drugs? I do believe that marijuana is a gateway drug”. The Levine’s then shared their opinion in which they agreed with the officer. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Father and former superintendent Herb Levine came to the middle high school to discuss his son’s previous addictions to drugs and alcohol. Herb Levine and his family struggled in helping their family member overcome a powerful addiction. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Father and former superintendent Herb Levine came to the middle high school to discuss his son’s previous addictions to drugs and alcohol. Herb Levine and his family struggled in helping their family member overcome a powerful addiction. Credit: Liam Crossen for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Joel Levine stands with his father, Herb, after the presentation.  He discusses how during his addiction to drugs, the amount of drugs and the intensity of the drugs he was taking increased rapidly. Joel quickly became addicted to heroin because the high was inexistent after doing other drugs. Joel says, “Heroin brought me to my knees quicker than anything else could”. He also talked about how he was feeling like he just wanted to die at times and wondered why he “would wake up every morning and be upset that the drugs I took the night before didn’t kill me. I am thankful to be alive”. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Joel Levine stands with his father, Herb, after the presentation. He discusses how during his addiction to drugs, the amount of drugs and the intensity of the drugs he was taking increased rapidly. Joel quickly became addicted to heroin because the high was inexistent after doing other drugs. Joel says, “Heroin brought me to my knees quicker than anything else could”. He also talked about how he was feeling like he just wanted to die at times and wondered why he “would wake up every morning and be upset that the drugs I took the night before didn’t kill me. I am thankful to be alive”. Credit: Cassandra Gonser and Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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