Students research health in a holistic fashion

In health teacher Eric Magers’s class, freshmen, sophomores, and a junior create powerpoint presentations on certain topics relating to healthy or unhealthy aspects of human life.

Sophomores Amber Paré and Madeleine Conway present their research on proper nutrition and diet.  Paré and Conway stress the importance of a healthy diet, which refers to eating full, nutritious meals that include all of the food groups.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Amber Paré and Madeleine Conway present their research on proper nutrition and diet. Paré and Conway stress the importance of a healthy diet, which refers to eating full, nutritious meals that include all of the food groups. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Avery Shaw and Annabelle Lord-Patey inform their class about healthy and abusive relationships and bullying.  Bullying is a major problem, as more than 1/2 of students have personally witnessed bullying at their school.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Avery Shaw and Annabelle Lord-Patey inform their class about healthy and abusive relationships and bullying. Bullying is a major problem, as more than 1/2 of students have personally witnessed bullying at their school. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Tommy Tofuri and junior Nathaniel Evans educate their peers on the topic of the human life cycle.  The main stages of the human life cycle are infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Tommy Tofuri and junior Nathaniel Evans educate their peers on the topic of the human life cycle. The main stages of the human life cycle are infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Matthew Kenney display their knowledge about lifestyle diseases.  Lifestyle diseases are caused by actions, behavior, and choices in one’s everyday life.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Matthew Kenney display their knowledge about lifestyle diseases. Lifestyle diseases are caused by actions, behavior, and choices in one’s everyday life. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robbie Sarmanian and Christian Hadagh exhibit their information on personal safety.  Sarmanian and Hadagh explain an acronym that outlines what one should do in a survival situation:S.T.O.P.  The S stands for sit down, the T is think, the O is observe, and the P is plan.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robbie Sarmanian and Christian Hadagh exhibit their information on personal safety. Sarmanian and Hadagh explain an acronym that outlines what one should do in a survival situation:S.T.O.P. The S stands for sit down, the T is think, the O is observe, and the P is plan. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Ethan Ketchum and freshman Jared Zaval explain learning disabilities.  Ketchum and Zaval describe ADHD, (which is attention deficit hyperactive disorder), autism, (which affects communication and social skills), and dyslexia (which is a developmental reading disorder).  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ethan Ketchum and freshman Jared Zaval explain learning disabilities. Ketchum and Zaval describe ADHD, (which is attention deficit hyperactive disorder), autism, (which affects communication and social skills), and dyslexia (which is a developmental reading disorder). Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Gallery: Assembly celebrates the season

The Manchester Essex middle and high schools came together to celebrate the holiday season in an assembly on the last day of school before break.

 

Juniors Sara Rhuda and Chelsea Rose sang several songs. Next, Essex Police Chief Peter Silva and his band of fellow law enforcement officers, Uncharted Watahs, played several songs. For a few of them, eighth grader Kendall Hershey accompanied on drums. The SoundWaves also sang with band.

 

This season the students of both schools brought in over $2800 in toys to donate to Pathways for Children. Additionally, the Rotary Club donated over $1000 in gift cards to students and their families that are in financial need.

 

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Sophomores Introduced to College Planning

Director of Guidance Beverly Low and guidance counselor Gillian Polk visit a sophomore history class to discuss college resumes and planning for the future.

Director of Guidance Beverly Low encourages students to think about how their choices of courses for junior year relate to college.  Low states that she prefers to introduce students to the college process in sophomore year so that the students can ease into the process, rather than dealing with it all at once.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Director of Guidance Beverly Low encourages students to think about how their choices of courses for junior year relate to college. Low states that she prefers to introduce students to the college process in sophomore year so that the students can ease into the process, rather than dealing with it all at once. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Low passes out notecards and asks students to specify what they see themselves doing in ten years.  Low explains that predictions on this notecard will be shown to the students in senior year, and that it will be compared to their updated predictions for their life in 2024.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Low passes out notecards and asks students to specify what they see themselves doing in ten years. Low explains that predictions on this notecard will be shown to the students in senior year, and that it will be compared to their updated predictions for their life in 2024. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Nellie Boling writes her prediction for her life in 2024.  The students were asked to describe their predicted occupations, lifestyles, and where think they will live.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Nellie Boling writes her prediction for her life in 2024. The students were asked to describe their predicted occupations, lifestyles, and where think they will live. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Guidance counselor Gillian Polk describes a website called Naviance, which is a platform to go through the college selection and application processes.  The website also helps students decide college majors and potential career choices.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Guidance counselor Gillian Polk describes a website called Naviance, which is a platform to go through the college selection and application processes. The website also helps students decide college majors and potential career choices. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The students are given a sheet of paper that helps provide an explanation of the Naviance website.  The students were asked to complete a career interest profiler and to start their resume for college.  The resumes are meant to contain extra-curricular activities that the students partake in throughout high school to show to colleges.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students are given a sheet of paper that helps provide an explanation of the Naviance website. The students were asked to complete a career interest profiler and to start their resume for college. The resumes are meant to contain extra-curricular activities that the students partake in throughout high school to show to colleges. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Bio students perform dialysis tubing lab

Erica Everett’s honors biology class study dialysis tubing with a selectively permeable membrane.  The objective of this lab was to understand the effects of semi-permeability.

Students open the dialysis tubing in order to be able to insert a starch and water mixture.  The dialysis tubing has a selectively-permeable membrane, which means it can control which molecules can enter through its specifically-sized pores.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students open the dialysis tubing in order to be able to insert a starch and water mixture. The dialysis tubing has a selectively-permeable membrane, which means it can control which molecules can enter through its specifically-sized pores. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy pours a mixture of water and starch into the dialysis tubing.  Since starch molecules are relatively large, the molecules cannot fit through the small pores in the membrane of the tubing and the starch remains in the tubing.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy pours a mixture of water and starch into the dialysis tubing. Since starch molecules are relatively large, the molecules cannot fit through the small pores in the membrane of the tubing and the starch remains in the tubing. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students wash off the exterior of the sealed dialysis tubing to get rid of excess starch.  To display the full effect of selective permeability, the starch must be contained within the tubing.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students wash off the exterior of the sealed dialysis tubing to get rid of excess starch. To display the full effect of selective permeability, the starch must be contained within the tubing. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students put a few drops of iodine in their beaker of water.  Iodine enters the tubing because its molecules are small enough to flow through the tubing’s membrane.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students put a few drops of iodine in their beaker of water. Iodine enters the tubing because its molecules are small enough to flow through the tubing’s membrane. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students place the sealed dialysis tubing in the water and iodine mixture.  The iodine slowly enters the tubing through the membrane to reach an equilibrium, which means that there will be the same concentration of iodine in the tubing and the water outside.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students place the sealed dialysis tubing in the water and iodine mixture. The iodine slowly enters the tubing through the membrane to reach an equilibrium, which means that there will be the same concentration of iodine in the tubing and the water outside. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The next day, the iodine has entered the tubing, and has reacted with the starch to make it a dark blue coloring.  A molecule in starch called amylose is responsible for the change in color when iodine mixes with it.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The next day, the iodine has entered the tubing, and has reacted with the starch to make it a dark blue coloring. A molecule in starch called amylose is responsible for the change in color when iodine mixes with it. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Advisory Groups Create Hand Turkeys

To finish the half day before Thanksgiving, four sophomore advisory groups gathered in art teacher Caroline Epp’s room to make Thanksgiving-inspired artwork.

Art teacher Caroline Epp instructs sophomores how to make hand turkeys.  Epp states that art has therapeutic value, and after a stressful fall, the students had a deserved opportunity to have fun and bond with each other.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Art teacher Caroline Epp instructs sophomores how to make hand turkeys. Epp states that art has therapeutic value, and after a stressful fall, the students had a deserved opportunity to have fun and bond with each other. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores gather materials to make their turkeys.  The students used a variety of methods and materials to make their own unique creations.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores gather materials to make their turkeys. The students used a variety of methods and materials to make their own unique creations. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker, Amber Paré, Jenny Duff, and Julia Potter trace their hands in preparation for cutting out the shape.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker, Amber Paré, Jenny Duff, and Julia Potter trace their hands in preparation for cutting out the shape. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Marco Kaper outlines his hand with marker for his turkey.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Marco Kaper outlines his hand with marker for his turkey. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Axel Fougere cuts out his hand tracing.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Axel Fougere cuts out his hand tracing. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Niamh Dalton, Eden Silag-Stearns, and Gillian Winn cut out their turkeys.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Niamh Dalton, Eden Silag-Stearns, and Gillian Winn cut out their turkeys. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bridgett Kiernan’s turkey.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bridgett Kiernan’s turkey. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Santana Tosi’s and Axel Fougere’s turkeys.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Santana Tosi’s and Axel Fougere’s turkeys. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Jenny Duff and Julia Potter’s turkey.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Jenny Duff and Julia Potter’s turkey. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker’s and Amber Paré’s turkeys.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker’s and Amber Paré’s turkeys. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Health students present information about dangers and effects of drugs

Eric Magers’ health class presents their powerpoints about their assigned drugs.  Students worked in partners or groups of three to answer assigned questions about two or more drugs in their presentations.

Sophomores Julia Przesiek and Emily Dahlen and freshman Jane Grady present about Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta.  Adderall is used primarily to treat ADHD, and it should not be used without a prescription.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Julia Przesiek and Emily Dahlen and freshman Jane Grady present about Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta. Adderall is used primarily to treat ADHD, and it should not be used without a prescription. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Madeleine Conway and Amber Paré inform the class about inhalants, whippets, adrenalin, and morphine.  While adrenalin is naturally in the body and morphine is used to treat severe pain, inhalants/whippets are used for a quick high with no medical benefits.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Madeleine Conway and Amber Paré inform the class about inhalants, whippets, adrenalin, and morphine. While adrenalin is naturally in the body and morphine is used to treat severe pain, inhalants/whippets are used for a quick high with no medical benefits. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Joseph Cirone explains steroids and GHB to the class.  Both drugs are often illegal when used to improve athletic performance.  For medical uses, GHB can be used as an anesthetic and steroids have a wide range of uses.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Joseph Cirone explains steroids and GHB to the class. Both drugs are often illegal when used to improve athletic performance. For medical uses, GHB can be used as an anesthetic and steroids have a wide range of uses. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Avery Shaw and Freshman Christian Hadaegh educate their peers about cough medication and Xanax.  Xanax is used as an antidepressant, and cough medicine is not only used for coughing, but it is also abused and can be addictive.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Avery Shaw and Freshman Christian Hadaegh educate their peers about cough medication and Xanax. Xanax is used as an antidepressant, and cough medicine is not only used for coughing, but it is also abused and can be addictive. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Nathaniel Rautio and Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Louis Masella describe Psilocybin mushrooms and desomorphine, or Krokodil.  Krokodil is composed of codeine, alcohol, gasoline, red phosphorus, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and paint thinner; it is known as a flesh-eating drug due to its large amount of tissue damage/infection.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Nathaniel Rautio and Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Louis Masella describe Psilocybin mushrooms and desomorphine, or Krokodil. Krokodil is composed of codeine, alcohol, gasoline, red phosphorus, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and paint thinner; it is known as a flesh-eating drug due to its large amount of tissue damage/infection. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tomaz Tofuri and Anthony Brazzo tell the class about marijuana and synthetic marijuana.  Synthetic marijuana, or spice, is a mixture of dried plant material and dangerous chemical additives which cause psychoactive effects.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tomaz Tofuri and Anthony Brazzo tell the class about marijuana and synthetic marijuana. Synthetic marijuana, or spice, is a mixture of dried plant material and dangerous chemical additives which cause psychoactive effects. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robert Sarmanian and Jared Zaval introduce information about cocaine, crack, and PCP.  Crack is a type of cocaine that must be smoked because of its rough, rocky texture, and PCP is also known Angel Dust, which can cause psychotic side effects.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robert Sarmanian and Jared Zaval introduce information about cocaine, crack, and PCP. Crack is a type of cocaine that must be smoked because of its rough, rocky texture, and PCP is also known Angel Dust, which can cause psychotic side effects. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Samantha Booma and Randall Doane display their knowledge about crystal meth and bath salts.  Bath salts are not what their name suggests; they are actually synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines.  Because of the resulting hallucinations and violent behavior, bath salts are known in media as the zombie drug.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Samantha Booma and Randall Doane display their knowledge about crystal meth and bath salts. Bath salts are not what their name suggests; they are actually synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines. Because of the resulting hallucinations and violent behavior, bath salts are known in media as the zombie drug. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Abigail Roundy and Frederick Spofford show their research on LSD and alcohol.   LSD produces anxiety, paranoia, and delusions.   Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Ethan Ketchum and Matthew Kenney give their presentation to the class about research chemicals. Although these chemicals are sometimes sold outside of medicine’s legislation to people as psychoactive drugs, they are meant for laboratory use only and are not intended for human use. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Sophomores Ethan Ketchum and Matthew Kenney give their presentation to the class about research chemicals.  Although these chemicals are sometimes sold outside of medicine’s legislation to people as psychoactive drugs, they are meant for laboratory use only and are not intended for human use.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Abigail Roundy and Frederick Spofford show their research on LSD and alcohol. LSD produces anxiety, paranoia, and delusions. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Bio students study eukaryotic cells

Erica Everett’s honors biology class used compound microscopes to view onion cells, potato cells, and skin cells.  The students made their own slides from materials given to them, and they replicated what they saw through the microscope on paper, identifying certain parts of each cell.

Students slice potatoes to place on slides, and shortly afterwards they place onto the potato slices drops of iodine which turns starch blue-black.  The pieces had to be extremely thin so that light could pass through and individual cells could be visible.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students slice potatoes to place on slides, and shortly afterwards they place onto the potato slices drops of iodine which turns starch blue-black. The pieces had to be extremely thin so that light could pass through and individual cells could be visible. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students add a drop of methylene blue stain to skin cells to be able to distinguish individual cells and their organelles.  To obtain these cells, students softly scraped the inside of their cheeks with toothpicks and rubbed the toothpick on empty slides.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students add a drop of methylene blue stain to skin cells to be able to distinguish individual cells and their organelles. To obtain these cells, students softly scraped the inside of their cheeks with toothpicks and rubbed the toothpick on empty slides. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Wolf Hahn slices an onion to obtain an extremely thin slice to put on an empty slide.  The slice had to be from the epidermis of the onion because of epidermal cells’ simple structure and transparency.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Wolf Hahn slices an onion to obtain an extremely thin slice to put on an empty slide. The slice had to be from the epidermis of the onion because of epidermal cells’ simple structure and transparency. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Courtney Holley and Bridgett Kiernan adjust the focus on their microscopes to identify the small organelles in each cell.  The students drew the cells on paper according to what they saw through the microscope and   labeled certain organelles.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Courtney Holley and Bridgett Kiernan adjust the focus on their microscopes to identify the small organelles in each cell. The students drew the cells on paper according to what they saw through the microscope and labeled certain organelles. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp studies a potato cell under his microscope.  The students learned about leucoplasts in potato cells which store the cell’s starch.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp studies a potato cell under his microscope. The students learned about leucoplasts in potato cells which store the cell’s starch. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy attach their slides on the stage of the microcope and study the intricate details.  The students were in groups of two, starting off with one partner observing potato cells and the other partner observing skin cells.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy attach their slides on the stage of the microcope and study the intricate details. The students were in groups of two, starting off with one partner observing potato cells and the other partner observing skin cells. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy examines her cheek skin cell.  The students were instructed to start studying the cell with a low power magnification to locate the cells on their slides, and then to increase the magnification to be able to see the cells and some of their individual parts.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy examines her cheek skin cell. The students were instructed to start studying the cell with a low power magnification to locate the cells on their slides, and then to increase the magnification to be able to see the cells and some of their individual parts. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Soucy draws a picture of the cells she can see through her microscope.  The students were told to identify the magnification that they used; low power is 10x, medium power is 100x, and high power is 400x with the specific microscopes that were used.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Soucy draws a picture of the cells she can see through her microscope. The students were told to identify the magnification that they used; low power is 10x, medium power is 100x, and high power is 400x with the specific microscopes that were used. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

An epidermal onion cell is magnified through a microscope.  The faint lines around each cell are the cell walls, which protect the cells and add structural support.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
An epidermal onion cell is magnified through a microscope. The faint lines around each cell are the cell walls, which protect the cells and add structural support. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Bio students study microscopes

Erica Everett’s honors biology students receive two different types of microscopes and learn the parts and functions of them.

Biology teacher Erica Everett describes the main differences between the dissecting microscope and the compound microscope.  While dissecting microscopes can be used with relatively thick specimen, the compound microscope has to be used with thin slides so that light can pass through.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Erica Everett describes the main differences between the dissecting microscope and the compound microscope. While dissecting microscopes can be used with relatively thick specimen, the compound microscope has to be used with thin slides so that light can pass through. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a dissecting microscope to the class.  Everett stresses the importance of carrying microscopes while supporting the base with one hand in case the base is not properly attached.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a dissecting microscope to the class. Everett stresses the importance of carrying microscopes while supporting the base with one hand in case the base is not properly attached. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a compound microscope, also known as a light microscope because of its reliance on visible light.  With the light microscope, one can view living things and their processes.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a compound microscope, also known as a light microscope because of its reliance on visible light. With the light microscope, one can view living things and their processes. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy become familiar with a dissecting microscope.  The students were told to research the parts of the microscope while they observed them to gain a further understanding.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy become familiar with a dissecting microscope. The students were told to research the parts of the microscope while they observed them to gain a further understanding. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp observes the functions of a light microscope.  Light microscopes have three objectives, which are high magnification, medium magnification, and low magnification, and they rotate so the observer can use the level of magnification necessary to view the specimen.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp observes the functions of a light microscope. Light microscopes have three objectives, which are high magnification, medium magnification, and low magnification, and they rotate so the observer can use the level of magnification necessary to view the specimen. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Julia Prziek researches the light microscope.  The light microscope has a light source below the platform to put specimen on-commonly known as a stage-and this light goes through a hole in the platform called a diaphragm.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Julia Prziek researches the light microscope. The light microscope has a light source below the platform to put specimen on-commonly known as a stage-and this light goes through a hole in the platform called a diaphragm. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feuerbach study the focusing controls on their compound microscope.  There are two knobs: the coarse focus, which moves the lenses closer and further from the specimen, and the fine focus, which makes more intricate focus adjustments.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feuerbach study the focusing controls on their compound microscope. There are two knobs: the coarse focus, which moves the lenses closer and further from the specimen, and the fine focus, which makes more intricate focus adjustments. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Hannah Soucy draws a diagram of the parts of a dissecting microscope.  Dissecting microscopes have one main focus knob which brings the objectives closer to the stage.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy draws a diagram of the parts of a dissecting microscope. Dissecting microscopes have one main focus knob which brings the objectives closer to the stage. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Local Veteran Speaks at Veteran’s Day Assembly

On Monday November 10th, the school held the annual Veteran’s Day assembly in the gym. Both schools attended the ceremony to honor local veterans, some of whom were present. Three Navy veterans and one Air Force veteran were invited to hear performances by the band, chorus, and the a Capella group as well as some presentations from students.

At the beginning of the ceremony, eighth graders Dan Rodier and Faithe Shatford read essays that they had previously written about Veterans Day meant to them and how they choose to view and to honor the brave veterans of our country. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
At the beginning of the ceremony, eighth graders Dan Rodier and Faithe Shatford read essays that they had previously written about Veterans Day meant to them and how they choose to view and to honor the brave veterans of our country. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Chorus director Donna O’Neill aided the chorus in their song selections. The chorus sang two songs during the ceremony, one of which was God Bless the USA. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Chorus director Donna O’Neill aided the chorus in their song selections. The chorus sang two songs during the ceremony, one of which was God Bless the USA. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Attending veteran William Davidson gave a speech during the ceremony. He spoke about how people in other countries do not have the freedoms that we do in the United States because of our veterans and he mentioned that we should thank all of our veterans for all that they have done for our country. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Attending veteran William Davidson gave a speech during the ceremony. He spoke about how people in other countries do not have the freedoms that we do in the United States because of our veterans and he mentioned that we should thank all of our veterans for all that they have done for our country. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Ramsey King and Stephen Ascolillo played Taps on their trumpets during the ceremony. King played the song once and then Ascolillo played the echo from the hallway. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Ramsey King and Stephen Ascolillo played Taps on their trumpets during the ceremony. King played the song once and then Ascolillo played the echo from the hallway. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Four former war veterans attended the school’s ceremony on Monday morning. Their names are William Davidson, Jack Buckley, George Nickless, and Billy Bell. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Four former war veterans attended the school’s ceremony on Monday morning. Their names are William Davidson, Jack Buckley, George Nickless, and Billy Bell. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in the percussion section not only played the drums but they also played the bells. Most military songs and anthems are percussion based because soldiers have always marched to military drummers using what is called war drums. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in the percussion section not only played the drums but they also played the bells. Most military songs and anthems are percussion based because soldiers have always marched to military drummers using what is called war drums. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Soundwaves preformed “Thank You Soldiers” to honor the veterans present at the assembly. The chorus, which includes all the Soundwaves members, also sang a few songs during the ceremony. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Soundwaves preformed “Thank You Soldiers” to honor the veterans present at the assembly. The chorus, which includes all the Soundwaves members, also sang a few songs during the ceremony. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Assistant Principal Paul Murphy thanks all of the students and faculty for coming to support our local veterans. Murphy had the honor of introducing the speaker, William Davidson as well as the other veterans, Jack Buckley, George Nickless, and Billy Bell. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Assistant Principal Paul Murphy thanks all of the students and faculty for coming to support our local veterans. Murphy had the honor of introducing the speaker, William Davidson as well as the other veterans, Jack Buckley, George Nickless, and Billy Bell. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The three Navy veterans, William Davidson, Jack Buckley and George Nickless stand during the bands performance of the Navy section of the cadence. The Navy’s song is titled “Anchors Aweigh” which was written in 1906 by Charles A. Zimmerman. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The three Navy veterans, William Davidson, Jack Buckley and George Nickless stand during the bands performance of the Navy section of the cadence. The Navy’s song is titled “Anchors Aweigh” which was written in 1906 by Charles A. Zimmerman. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Billy Bell, an Air Force veteran, stands during the Air Force’s part of the cadence. The song of the Air Force is  "Off We Go Into the Wild Blue Yonder" which was written by a crop of Army Air Corps wives in the late 1930’s. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Billy Bell, an Air Force veteran, stands during the Air Force’s part of the cadence. The song of the Air Force is “Off We Go Into the Wild Blue Yonder” which was written by a crop of Army Air Corps wives in the late 1930’s. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The whole student body and all of the faulty stands to cheer for band director Joe Sokol in the completion of his last Veterans day assembly. In addition to the assemblies and ceremonies, Sokol has also been teaching band and leading his students during football games. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The whole student body and all of the faulty stands to cheer for band director Joe Sokol in the completion of his last Veterans day assembly. In addition to the assemblies and ceremonies, Sokol has also been teaching band and leading his students during football games. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Speaker William Davidson shakes the hands of his fellow Veteran George Nickless after the ceremony was finished. All of the veterans took time out to thank each other and they also received handshakes and gratitude from many of the students. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Speaker William Davidson shakes the hands of his fellow Veteran George Nickless after the ceremony was finished. All of the veterans took time out to thank each other and they also received handshakes and gratitude from many of the students. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Chorus director Donna O’Neill shakes the hand of Nickless to thank him for his years of service in the Navy. The US Navy was formed in 1775 by George Washington in order to intercept British supply ships coming towards Massachusetts. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Chorus director Donna O’Neill shakes the hand of Nickless to thank him for his years of service in the Navy. The US Navy was formed in 1775 by George Washington in order to intercept British supply ships coming towards Massachusetts. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As the strudents were filing into the gym, the veterans had a chance to chat with middle school principal Steve Guditus. Along with it being Guditus’ second year as principal, it is also high school principal Patricia Puglisi’s second year as principle. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As the strudents were filing into the gym, the veterans had a chance to chat with middle school principal Steve Guditus. Along with it being Guditus’ second year as principal, it is also high school principal Patricia Puglisi’s second year as principle. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The band played the national anthem as all four veterans saluted the flag. The military salute is always done with the right hand unless the right hand cannot be used. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The band played the national anthem as all four veterans saluted the flag. The military salute is always done with the right hand unless the right hand cannot be used. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade students Paige Mandia and Jenna Cirella sang “God Bless America” together towards the beginning of the assembly. This American patriotic song was written by Irving Berlin in 1918, but he revised it about twenty years later. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade students Paige Mandia and Jenna Cirella sang “God Bless America” together towards the beginning of the assembly. This American patriotic song was written by Irving Berlin in 1918, but he revised it about twenty years later. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Band director Joseph Sokol leads the high school band in their patriotic songs to honor the veterans present at the ceremony.  This is Sokol’s final Veterans’ Day ceremony at MERHS after over thirty years of teaching band.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Band director Joseph Sokol leads the high school band in their patriotic songs to honor the veterans present at the ceremony. This is Sokol’s final Veterans’ Day ceremony at MERHS after over thirty years of teaching band. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The high school chorus performs a selection entitled “America!” under the direction of Donna O’Neill.  The high school A Cappella group performed afterwards. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The high school chorus performs a selection entitled “America!” under the direction of Donna O’Neill. The high school A Cappella group performed afterwards. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Band director Joseph Sokol conducts the high school band.  The band played four songs, including a cadence, which contained songs for each of the four branches of the military.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Band director Joseph Sokol conducts the high school band. The band played four songs, including a cadence, which contained songs for each of the four branches of the military. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Davidson provides a speech for the high school and middle school.  The speech contained a call to action for students, challenging them to appreciate and thank veterans on Veterans’ Day.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Davidson provides a speech for the high school and middle school. The speech contained a call to action for students, challenging them to appreciate and thank veterans on Veterans’ Day. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The band performs “This Is My Country.”  This was the only selection that did not include the percussion section.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The band performs “This Is My Country.” This was the only selection that did not include the percussion section. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Bio students study molecular structures

The students in Erica Everett’s honors biology class work in teams to further their understanding of molecules and assemble structural models of carbohydrate molecules.

Students received a worksheet/guide to help them examine molecules and construct their own structural formulas.  A molecular formula shows the amount and types of atoms, and a structural formula does the same while also shows the layout of the atoms in a given molecule.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students received a worksheet/guide to help them examine molecules and construct their own structural formulas. A molecular formula shows the amount and types of atoms, and a structural formula does the same while also shows the layout of the atoms in a given molecule. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feurbach assemble two models of monosaccharides, or single sugars.  Molecules of different monosaccharides have the same amount of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, but they differ in their structural formulas. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feurbach assemble two models of monosaccharides, or single sugars. Molecules of different monosaccharides have the same amount of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, but they differ in their structural formulas. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After constructing their molecules, sophomores Tracy Blagden and Julia Prziek answer guiding questions on their worksheets.  The students studied the formulas of glucose, galactose, and fructose, which are all simple sugars found in various foods.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After constructing their molecules, sophomores Tracy Blagden and Julia Prziek answer guiding questions on their worksheets. The students studied the formulas of glucose, galactose, and fructose, which are all simple sugars found in various foods. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy build models of disaccharides, or double sugars.   A disaccharide is formed when two monosaccharide molecules chemically join together.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy build models of disaccharides, or double sugars. A disaccharide is formed when two monosaccharide molecules chemically join together. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The students’  finished models are placed on display in the back of the classroom.  After assembling double sugars, the students constructed complex sugars, which are formed when many single sugars are joined together chemically.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students’ finished models are placed on display in the back of the classroom. After assembling double sugars, the students constructed complex sugars, which are formed when many single sugars are joined together chemically. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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