7th grade art class creates accordion books

Tamera Burns’ 7th grade art class created accordion books. Students were assigned several mini projects that would be placed in the books later. Assignments ranged from sewing to perspective drawing.

Students start the class off after gathering their materials. Due to different paces among the class, students were working on different assignments. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students start the class off after gathering their materials. Due to different paces among the class, students were working on different assignments. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Accordion booklets are displayed as seventh graders continue working. Students decorated the cover with paint according to their liking. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Accordion booklets are displayed as seventh graders continue working. Students decorated the cover with paint according to their liking. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Rebecca Shan glues on some of the final pieces to her sewing project. Teacher Tamera Burns said she chose to make the project consist of smaller assignments because it was easier for students to focus on shorter projects towards the end of the year. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Rebecca Shan glues on some of the final pieces to her sewing project. Teacher Tamera Burns said she chose to make the project consist of smaller assignments because it was easier for students to focus on shorter projects towards the end of the year. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Seventh grader Adam Roy sews sting onto his collage to add lines and color. Students cut out pieces of paper and made a collage out of them by gluing them to construction paper. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Adam Roy sews sting onto his collage to add lines and color. Students cut out pieces of paper and made a collage out of them by gluing them to construction paper. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Assignments will be placed on the inner flaps of this accordion book once student work is complete. Books will be sent home at the end of the year. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Assignments will be placed on the inner flaps of this accordion book once student work is complete. Books will be sent home at the end of the year. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Seventh grader Meredith Wolf finishes up the day with cleaning out her water colors and washing her hands. Students will have about a week and a half more to finish up any assignments they want in their booklet. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Meredith Wolf finishes up the day with cleaning out her water colors and washing her hands. Students will have about a week and a half more to finish up any assignments they want in their booklet. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Freshman advisory groups discuss ethics and values

The high school advisory program allows students to meet in their advisory programs about once a month to discuss different topics that relate to issues both in and out of school. The topic for this week’s freshman discussion was ethics and morals.

Prior to a full-group discussion, students wrote down their own definitions of ethics and values. The group later defined ethics as “a relative morale perspective of what a person thinks is good or bad.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Prior to a full-group discussion, students wrote down their own definitions of ethics and values. The group later defined ethics as “a relative morale perspective of what a person thinks is good or bad.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Emily Stanton makes changes to her definition of ethics so that it included the words “moral” and “good or bad”. After writing in their journals, students viewed a video that showed how different people define ethics. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Emily Stanton makes changes to her definition of ethics so that it included the words “moral” and “good or bad”. After writing in their journals, students viewed a video that showed how different people define ethics. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Maria Burgess converses with students about why it is important to have morals and how ethics can vary from person to person. The advisory group later viewed a video reading of a poem titled “Travelling Through the Dark” and discussed possible views of ethics that were related to it. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Maria Burgess converses with students about why it is important to have morals and how ethics can vary from person to person. The advisory group later viewed a video reading of a poem titled “Travelling Through the Dark” and discussed possible views of ethics that were related to it. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students listen as the class begins a debate about possible views of ethics. Advisor Maria Burgess proposed this question for the class to debate: “If fifteen people on a boat that could only hold twelve, what do you think should happen?” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students listen as the class begins a debate about possible views of ethics. Advisor Maria Burgess proposed this question for the class to debate: “If fifteen people on a boat that could only hold twelve, what do you think should happen?” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Annabelle Haskell listens to Brian Carlson talk about ethics and morals. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would listen and learn what is good and bad. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Annabelle Haskell listens to Brian Carlson talk about ethics and morals. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would listen and learn what is good and bad. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson goes into detail about what are good morals and good ethics. A moral is a lesson and figuring out between right and wrong. An ethic is a set of rules for people to follow.  Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson goes into detail about what are good morals and good ethics. A moral is a lesson and figuring out between right and wrong. An ethic is a set of rules for people to follow. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Carlson had a sheet to guide him of situations of morals and ethics. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would give an answer after Carlson read the question. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson had a sheet to guide him of situations of morals and ethics. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would give an answer after Carlson read the question. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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French class plays game to prepare for test

Foreign language teacher Erin Forunato’s freshman French class competed in a game that reviewed chapter material. Students were broken into groups, and took turns rolling dice to answer specific questions that corresponded with questions on a game board.

Students gather in teams as teacher Erin Fortunato explains how the game is played. Teams agreed on a magnet to represent them on the game board, which was projected on the class whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students gather in teams as teacher Erin Fortunato explains how the game is played. Teams agreed on a magnet to represent them on the game board, which was projected on the class whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Fortunato explains what categories can be landed on in the game. There were five symbols on the board that corresponded to categories in the game: translations, the imperfect tense, culture, vocabulary, and context situations. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Fortunato explains what categories can be landed on in the game. There were five symbols on the board that corresponded to categories in the game: translations, the imperfect tense, culture, vocabulary, and context situations. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
To determine who gets to roll the dice first, freshmen Annabelle Haskell and Lily Moore play rock paper scissors. Team members were required to take turns rolling the dice and answering questions that were asked. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
To determine who gets to roll the dice first, freshmen Annabelle Haskell and Lily Moore play rock paper scissors. Team members were required to take turns rolling the dice and answering questions that were asked. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman David LaForge rolls the die for his team. The number on the die when it was rolled determined how many spaces each team could move; if an answer was incorrect, the team would move back to their original spot. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman David LaForge rolls the die for his team. The number on the die when it was rolled determined how many spaces each team could move; if an answer was incorrect, the team would move back to their original spot. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A team collaborates on possible answers while freshman Julia Przesiek writes down their ideas. Whenever a student answered a question, he or she was not allowed to look at the written answer on the whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A team collaborates on possible answers while freshman Julia Przesiek writes down their ideas. Whenever a student answered a question, he or she was not allowed to look at the written answer on the whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Freshman Nellie Boling finishes up the game as she writes her final answer for a question about the imperfect tense. No teams were able to finish the entire game, which resulted in a five-way tie, so teacher Erin Fortunato decided to give them all candy on the test day. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Nellie Boling finishes up the game as she writes her final answer for a question about the imperfect tense. No teams were able to finish the entire game, which resulted in a five-way tie, so teacher Erin Fortunato decided to give them all candy on the test day. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Freshmen French students perform conversations

Students in Erin Fortunato’s French class prepared and performed conversations after learning the imperfect tense. Students were assigned partners a few days prior to the conversation and were given time in class to prepare.

Students meet up with their partners before the conversations began. Teacher Erin Forunato allotted time before the presentations for pairs to prepare. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students meet up with their partners before the conversations began. Teacher Erin Forunato allotted time before the presentations for pairs to prepare. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students Lillian  Shraft and Maddie Conway practice their conversation while adding emotion and gestures. Because the class is made up of two levels, the Honors class was expected to perform a day earlier than the CP class. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students Lillian Shraft and Maddie Conway practice their conversation while adding emotion and gestures. Because the class is made up of two levels, the Honors class was expected to perform a day earlier than the CP class. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Teacher Erin Fortunato assists students by giving them pointers on their conversations. Partners were required to use the imperfect tense to talk about their childhood. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Teacher Erin Fortunato assists students by giving them pointers on their conversations. Partners were required to use the imperfect tense to talk about their childhood. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshmen Becka Hillie-Tawater, Nellie Boling, and Geran Sadler review their conversation. Students were required to ask their partner a total of five questions about his/her childhood. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshmen Becka Hillie-Tawater, Nellie Boling, and Geran Sadler review their conversation. Students were required to ask their partner a total of five questions about his/her childhood. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Partners Julia Przesiek and David LaForge present their conversation about their childhood. The imperfect tense is used to describe how something or someone used to be, have, or do. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Partners Julia Przesiek and David LaForge present their conversation about their childhood. The imperfect tense is used to describe how something or someone used to be, have, or do. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

The next pair, Fritz Spofford and Liddy DeConto, stand in front of the room to perform their conversation. Some criteria that students were graded on included the comfort and fluency of the conversation. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
The next pair, Fritz Spofford and Liddy DeConto, stand in front of the room to perform their conversation. Some criteria that students were graded on included the comfort and fluency of the conversation. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Seventh grade English class performs Shakespeare

Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class is currently doing a unit on drama. As a part of this unit, the class is reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare. Each person was assigned a role, and the class is interpreting and acting out the play.

Students watch as their fellow classmates make their way up to the front of the room in preparation to act out the second scene of the first act of the play. In this scene, craftsmen are planning a play to perform at the wedding of King Theseus and Queen Hippolyta. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students watch as their fellow classmates make their way up to the front of the room in preparation to act out the second scene of the first act of the play. In this scene, craftsmen are planning a play to perform at the wedding of King Theseus and Queen Hippolyta. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A group of students stands in line during the first part of the scene. Students were instructed to never allow their backs to face the audience; each time an actor showed his or her back, students watching the scene were encouraged to say “Cut!” in order to allow actors to change how they performed the scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A group of students stands in line during the first part of the scene. Students were instructed to never allow their backs to face the audience; each time an actor showed his or her back, students watching the scene were encouraged to say “Cut!” in order to allow actors to change how they performed the scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Actors listen as the student who played Nick Bottom, a weaver, read his lines. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was originally performed between 1592 and 1596 in England. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Actors listen as the student who played Nick Bottom, a weaver, read his lines. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was originally performed between 1592 and 1596 in England. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A table of students laughs while observing a scene in the play. William Shakespeare is known for including elements of comedy in his plays; such as a joke about the French king in this scene of the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A table of students laughs while observing a scene in the play. William Shakespeare is known for including elements of comedy in his plays; such as a joke about the French king in this scene of the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
English teacher Abby Whittredge demonstrates how a group of lines by the character Nick Bottom must be read. Most of Shakespeare’s plays were performed at the Globe Theater located in England.  Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
English teacher Abby Whittredge demonstrates how a group of lines by the character Nick Bottom must be read. Most of Shakespeare’s plays were performed at the Globe Theater located in England. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students read along as the scene is performed. Teacher Abby Whittredge provided books for the students, but some opted to purchase a copy of the play that included the lines translated into more modern English. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students read along as the scene is performed. Teacher Abby Whittredge provided books for the students, but some opted to purchase a copy of the play that included the lines translated into more modern English. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Ben Lantz assists actors in the blocking out of the scene by providing ideas about where and how they should stand. Blocking determines where and how actors should say their lines during a scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Ben Lantz assists actors in the blocking out of the scene by providing ideas about where and how they should stand. Blocking determines where and how actors should say their lines during a scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

English teacher Abby Whittredge joins the actors on stage to suggest how a conversation between Quince and Bottom should be read. Quince is attempting to convince Bottom to play the part of Pyramus, while Bottom has his heart set on playing every single part in the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
English teacher Abby Whittredge joins the actors on stage to suggest how a conversation between Quince and Bottom should be read. Quince is attempting to convince Bottom to play the part of Pyramus, while Bottom has his heart set on playing every single part in the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Seventh grade class creates anti-bullying art work

Tamera Burns’ seventh grade art class created comic strips that were inspired by bullying awareness. The drawing could be inspired by real life experiences or a fictitious situation. Work created by the students will be used to promote bullying awareness that occurs both inside and outside of school.

Students gather their materials and begin to work on their projects. Each student’s comic strip was required to use perspective, a splash page, conflict, and resolution. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students gather their materials and begin to work on their projects. Each student’s comic strip was required to use perspective, a splash page, conflict, and resolution. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Art teacher Tamera Burns and student Emily Andrews observe an exemplar comic strip that was displayed in the classroom. Burns advised Andrews to use distance to her advantage in order to give the work better perspective. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Art teacher Tamera Burns and student Emily Andrews observe an exemplar comic strip that was displayed in the classroom. Burns advised Andrews to use distance to her advantage in order to give the work better perspective. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Rebecca Shan traces over her drawing using a Sharpie marker. All comic strips were required to be first drawn in pencil and later be traced and colored in using Sharpies. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Rebecca Shan traces over her drawing using a Sharpie marker. All comic strips were required to be first drawn in pencil and later be traced and colored in using Sharpies. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students Adam Roy and Natalie Koopman consult one another on how they could improve their drawings. Roy advised Koopman to make characters in her comic drawn with more clear and concise lines. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students Adam Roy and Natalie Koopman consult one another on how they could improve their drawings. Roy advised Koopman to make characters in her comic drawn with more clear and concise lines. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Emma Dizio adds black shading to a square in her comic strip. Dizio’s work incorporated the social media aspect of bullying that comes with a world being centered around technology. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Emma Dizio adds black shading to a square in her comic strip. Dizio’s work incorporated the social media aspect of bullying that comes with a world being centered around technology. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Art teacher Tamera Burns uses a paper slicer to trim off the edges of finished pieces. Burns commented, “Bullying is something that nearly everyone goes through; this project is something that these students can relate to, especially because they are in Middle School.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Art teacher Tamera Burns uses a paper slicer to trim off the edges of finished pieces. Burns commented, “Bullying is something that nearly everyone goes through; this project is something that these students can relate to, especially because they are in Middle School.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A table of students discusses the project while working on their comic strips. In addition to using pencils and Sharpies, students also used stencils to give their work clearer lines and provide perspective. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A table of students discusses the project while working on their comic strips. In addition to using pencils and Sharpies, students also used stencils to give their work clearer lines and provide perspective. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

This finished piece was displayed for the class to be used as an example. While some students chose to portray a real-life situation, others chose to create one using fictional characters. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
This finished piece was displayed for the class to be used as an example. While some students chose to portray a real-life situation, others chose to create one using fictional characters. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Freshmen Advisory groups build communities

High School advisory groups meet about once a month to discuss topics ranging from character to how to deal with stress. The goal of the freshman advisory meetings on Wednesday April 16th was to build a sense of community within the groups through participating in fun activities. Groups did things such as playing games or creating sculptures, and some even enjoyed snacks during the meeting.

 

Advisor Maria Burgess pours some Hawaiian Punch for freshman Bridget Kiernan. Burgess and her co-advisor, Margret Driscoll, brought in Hawaiian Punch, cookies, and brownies for the group to enjoy. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Maria Burgess pours some Hawaiian Punch for freshman Bridget Kiernan. Burgess and her co-advisor, Margret Driscoll, brought in Hawaiian Punch, cookies, and brownies for the group to enjoy. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Margret Driscoll watches as students Marco Kaper, Jack Colpoys, and Kevin Hiselman play a card game. Driscoll commented during the meeting, “This is such a great idea. We should do things like this more often. It’s a great way to relieve stress.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Margret Driscoll watches as students Marco Kaper, Jack Colpoys, and Kevin Hiselman play a card game. Driscoll commented during the meeting, “This is such a great idea. We should do things like this more often. It’s a great way to relieve stress.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshmen Becka Hillie-Tawater and Courtney Holley enjoy a game of cards while eating their snack. Students got into groups and selected one of several games brought in by Driscoll and Burgess that ranged from Millionaire to Bananagrams. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Becka Hillie-Tawater and Courtney Holley enjoy a game of cards while eating their snack. Students got into groups and selected one of several games brought in by Driscoll and Burgess that ranged from Millionaire to Bananagrams. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students play a card game known as Magic. Advisees were encouraged to branch outside of their typical group of friends and try something new during the meeting in order to build the group’s sense of community. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students play a card game known as Magic. Advisees were encouraged to branch outside of their typical group of friends and try something new during the meeting in order to build the group’s sense of community. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Emily Parker began building her stick figure by taping together her paper art straws with painters tape. Parker’s goal was to create a flower. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Emily Parker began building her stick figure by taping together her paper art straws with painters tape. Parker’s goal was to create a flower. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Jake Brugger finished off his design by taping the triangle to the rest of the design. Brugger decided to make a lacrosse stick to add to the final sculpture. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Jake Brugger finished off his design by taping the triangle to the rest of the design. Brugger decided to make a lacrosse stick to add to the final sculpture. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The abstract sculpture was finally put together and completed. Everyone created a different design. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The abstract sculpture was finally put together and completed. Everyone created a different design. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students listen to what Carlson as he explains the rules of the games they were about to play. The objective for this advisory is for everyone to communicate with each other and for everyone to have a fun time. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students listen to what Carlson as he explains the rules of the games they were about to play. The objective for this advisory is for everyone to communicate with each other and for everyone to have a fun time. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Annabelle Lord-Patey raises her hand with the answer to the riddle in Brian Carlson’s advisory class. Carlson’s advisory sat together trying to figure out each riddle Carlson said. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Annabelle Lord-Patey raises her hand with the answer to the riddle in Brian Carlson’s advisory class. Carlson’s advisory sat together trying to figure out each riddle Carlson said. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students laugh and have a good time while listening to the riddles and trying to figure them out. Carlson’s advisory also plays many other games. For example board games, card games, and draw. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students laugh and have a good time while listening to the riddles and trying to figure them out. Carlson’s advisory also plays many other games. For example board games, card games, and draw. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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