Boys basketball attributes success to Sigsbury

By Nabila Mahmud

Due to team work, dedication, and the hard work of Duane Sigsbury, the boys’ varsity basketball team has only improved throughout the past four years, according to players.

  Starting off with a season ending record of 14-7 in 2009 and ending with a 17-5 record last year, Sigsbury has set this current year’s team up for victory by progressively improving his coaching methods each year.

  According to senior captain Joe Burgess, Sigsbury’s coaching method has lead to triumph for two reasons: Sigsbury’s unique coaching style and the bond formed between the team and the coach.

  “It’s the way he taught us to play the game. He taught us to work together as a team. He just made us all better competitors,” Burgess said.

  On a personal level, Sigsbury has affected each player in his own way. According to senior captain Sean Nally, Sigsbury is one of the people that influence him the most in an “unexplainable” type of way.

Senior captain Casey Weld attributes his personal growth within the game entirely to Sigsbury.

  “Sigs has changed my game in a variety of ways. He’s showed me that in anything I do, I’ve got to go 100 percent. On the court he’s taught us toughness and determination. Under his coaching my game has improved tremendously, and our team accredits ALL of our success to his coaching,” Weld said.

  Senior captain Chris Bishop agreed.

  “He is the greatest coach we’ve ever had. He just wants us to succeed, and as long as we put the work in and show up, he’s pretty much able to outcoach anyone,” Bishop said.

  In terms of knowledge of the sport, the consensus is obvious: Sigsbury truly knows the game.

  “He’s got everything down to a system. He can formulate plays in like three seconds,” Nally said. Manager Max Rodier supports Nally in saying, “He motivates the team and is very skillful. He has a deep knowledge of the game.”

  Although the pure skill and dedication can be attributed the team’s 13-2 record, according to Nally the bond is what really connects the team on the court.

  “Sigs is a great guy, he loves us all and we love him back. Best coach in the world,” Nally said.

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Staying safe on snowy roads

By Nabila Mahmud

    Making one wrong move driving on a snowy road can turn into a near death experience. Even the most experienced driver can suffer from the inevitable ice skid, while rookie drivers are even more susceptible. No amount of knowledge is enough when it comes to staying safe while driving.

  AAA recognizes adverse weather can be the trickiest to drive in because of the lack of awareness about risky conditions.

  The best advice about driving in the winter is to maintain a solid concentration. Driving while fatigued is a poor idea in general; driving in the winter requires a higher level of concentration in order to recognize obstacles such as black ice or snow sheaths.

  Furthermore, keeping your car in the best condition possible is imperative. Ensuring your gas tank is at least half full will prevent a fuel line freeze, while keeping your gas tires properly inflated will provide for a smoother more efficient trip.

  During the winter, the actual act of driving is the most critical. The number one rule is to accelerate and decelerate as slowly as possible to avoid any slippage. Once you lose control of the wheel, gaining control back becomes an anxiety-induced, frightening task. Remember: it takes longer to slow down on icy roads.

  The obvious incident most people would like to avoid is an accident. The typical distancing rule of three to four seconds behind the preceding car turns into eight to 10 seconds. Rear-ending a car on a below-zero day typically involves awkwardly waiting for police while an angry driver is silently (or obviously) cussing you out —that’s not fun.

  Another way to avoid this awkward scenario is threshold braking: braking with the heel of your foot on the ground and the ball of your foot firmly on the pedal.

  The best winter driving advice anyone can offer is the following: do not drive unless absolutely necessary. Stay inside and enjoy the snow

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Teachers surprise students with flash mob

By Nabila Mahmud

Independent Editor

After three weeks of coordinating and planning, middle school and high school teachers stormed the floor of the gym dancing in the formation of a flash mob at the fall pep rally.

A flash mob is a group of people who randomly assemble in a public location, perform a pointless act, typically dancing, and disperse, simply to create a scene—which is just what the teachers did.

“It was unlike any other pep rally we’ve seen before. Pep rallies are usually the same thing: the band, some cheering, some games; this flash mob added excitement we haven’t seen for a while,” senior Graham Shaw said.

The ambush was a product of weeks of planning by history teachers Abby Donnelly and Jen Coleman, who coordinated each dance move, selected each song, and conducted every rehearsal.

“Every teacher could obviously not make every rehearsal, so they sent out YouTube videos and tutorials for each dance move to make learning the steps easier,” history teacher Lauren DuBois said.

Songs included multiple mainstream hits such as “Teach me how to Dougie” and “Party Rock Anthem,” and teachers demonstrated dance moves such as the “dougie” and the “bernie.”

“It was unbelievable watching the teachers dougie! It’s something all of us younger kids have obviously seen, so it’s funny watching your teachers dance to songs that you wouldn’t even think they’ve heard, let alone know  the dances to,” junior Natalie Caponigro said.

According to history teacher James Wallimann, he participated not only show off his “highly proficient” dance moves, but to also “get the student body excited about something.”

DuBois agreed, “I love spirit, and I love anything to get you guys going. It’s good fun. You guys are lucky to have young teachers who want you to enjoy your time at school and do these types of things for you.”

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Boys’ soccer stays positive through multiple injuries

 

By Nabila Mahmud

Independent Editor

Despite numerous player injuries and a 2-16 record, the boys’ varsity soccer team kept a positive outlook on the season.

The boys won two of their league games against Marblehead and Amesbury.

“Record-wise we were a little short, but the key is that we persevered through many injuries to play our best soccer,” coach Robert Bilsbury said.

The team suffered injuries to eight different players including two out of the three senior captains. Senior captain Sebi Wooding was ill for four matches while Erik Keefe watched from sidelines, enduring an ankle injury for three weeks before the season ended; he missed seven games.

“It really got to me when we lost. I got pretty aggravated watching because I really wanted to play and help out the team but I was physically unable to,” Keefe said.

According to senior captain Andrew Randall, positions had to be changed to deal with the injuries.

Keefe agreed, “It was really tough having to change all the positions. A lot of people had to step up their game like [juniors] Hunter Coons and Max Nesbit and [seniors] Jeff White and Andrew Randall.”

Because the team will only be losing a total of four seniors, Bilsbury believes next season will be a more successful season.

“We have a solid group of juniors and underclassmen. I think we will be able to compete in the league. We will be able to battle a lot tougher.”

Bilsbury continued, “We need to work hard during the off season though. Fitness and skills will be key.”

 

 

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Soothe, prevent chapped lips during dry weather

Chelitis, also known as chapped lips, is a commonly complained about nuisance. What causes chapped lips? How can you fix it? What are the best products to temporarily solve a life long struggle with dry lips?

By Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  Chelitis, also known as chapped lips, is a commonly complained about nuisance. What causes chapped lips?  How can you fix it? What are the best products to temporarily solve a life long struggle with dry lips?

  Before you decide to invest in a new lip balm, take a look into why dry lips occur and how you can prevent the problem.

  Contrary to popular belief, chapped lips are not just a result of chilly weather and crisp winds. This condition stems off of a deeper issue rooted in dehydration. Lips become dry from dehydration which leads to painful cracking and peeling.

    Commonly used products to solve the cracked lips problem include lip balms. Typically, when people do not have lip balm, the reaction is to lick your lips and saturate them in your saliva.

  Licking your lips is the worst thing you can do when suffering from cracked lips. The moisture in saliva is transferred onto the lips and proceeds to evaporate which further dries the lips.

  So what are the best products to use? If you do not mind the honey, eucalyptus smell, Burt’s Beeswax is the prime choice for you. Burt’s Beeswax has numerous different colored tints, shines, and flavors including clear to cater to each man or woman’s needs while still moisturizing lips. Normally, the price range is $3-10.

  If you do not desire a shine or if you are a boy then a fantastic choice for you is Carmex, typically $20-10. The balm hydrates lips without adding a girly shine.

  Another lip quenching balm is Neutrogena’s balm which is typically on sale for $8.99. Neutrogena’s product leaves the lips moist without constant application.

  The worst, but surprisingly popular, lip balm you can use is SoftLips which range from $2-10. The narrow shaped applicator requires numerous applications to cover the full surface of the lips. The coated balm moisturizes the lips for an extremely limited time. The attractive exterior distracts from the quality of the actual balm which is unable to satisfy chapped lips.

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New sustainability course connects students with community

A new pilot course titled “Green Scholars” is immersing students in the logistics of sustainability while they interact with the community. Founded by curriculum director Scott Morrison and Green Team founder Eric Magers, the honors level class assigns different projects to each student.

By Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  A new pilot course titled “Green Scholars” is immersing students in the logistics of sustainability while they interact with the community. Founded by curriculum director Scott Morrison and Green Team founder Eric Magers, the honors level class assigns different projects to each student.

  “It is an outstanding program that exposes students to the importance of recycling and taking care of our environment. It is very forward thinking. There are very few school districts across the Commonwealth that are taking part in this type of program. I’m pleased that we are on the cutting edge,” Assistant Principal Paul Murphy said.

  The course allows students to independently work during a school block. The grading system is based off of Status Reports where students explain what their accomplishments were throughout the work. Also, active participation is graded along with attending weekly meetings.

  According to Magers, the course is designed to engage and motivate students to become “proactive, innovative and entrepreneurial problem-solvers” who are able to address environmental challenges while employing critical thinking and leadership skills.

  The Green Team is a part of the green school alliance whose “mission is to create greener and healthier learning environments through education and awareness” according to its mission statement.

  The class, stemming from the threat of environmental issues, utilizes students by giving them each an individual task or project.  Each student is assigned a community partner who he or she can connect with.

     “Community partners are a crucial component of the Green Scholar program because they provide to the scholars a level of expertise in a specific content area.  Working in concert with the school, our community partners help the scholars to engage in skill building and allow the school and the community to work together toward a common goal,” Morrison said.

    The partners are specific to the project each student is assigned. Projects range from interacting with the community with tasks such as planting gardens, aiding restaurants in becoming more eco-friendly, and reducing waste in public areas. In order to raise awareness about the program, there are projects where students engage in business ventures such as producing environmental documentaries, and writing grants.

   “The program allows students to work independently on projects that have a clear purpose. Green Scholars allows students to feel as if they are actively learning something imperatively useful,” Manchester-Essex junior Shauna Rice said.

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Should people become famous through Youtube? – Pro

Entertainment is something this country thrives on and always will thrive on. With the advancement of the Internet, it is inevitable that people will take complete advantage of the opportunities arising. One of these opportunities is the ever-so-famous YouTube.

By Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT STAFF

  Entertainment is something this country thrives on and always will thrive on. With the advancement of the Internet, it is inevitable that people will take complete advantage of the opportunities arising. One of these opportunities is the ever-so-famous YouTube.

  When YouTube started off as a free video uploading source, it was simply a place where people were allowed to save their videos on the Internet. Since then, we see people becoming YouTube phenomenons by posting videos of them doing interesting things.

  We all see kids in class laughing at popular YouTube videos like “Bed Intruder,” “Charlie Bit My Finger,” or “Scarlett Takes a Tumble” because social media is something that the current student generation is focused on. People are always on the computer, and people are always on YouTube. It only makes sense that they find entertainment through it.

  Fame is simply something that comes from posting or starring in a hilarious video. What makes this type of fame any less credible than people like Paris Hilton who are famous for being a hotel heiress? In this day and age, unfortunately, people are famous for shallow, miniscule reasons. Superficiality is the way society works, and there is no getting around it.

  Also, fame on YouTube can result in positive outcomes such as political awareness or talented musical artists who otherwise would never have gotten discovered.

  Take the YouTube video that caused a media frenzy during Present Obama’s campaign. BarelyPolitical made a music video that went viral with “Obama Girl” singing about the president which caused political awareness.

Bo Burnham is the local musician/comedian who got his start on YouTube. The tween sensation Justin Beiber would never have been discovered if it weren’t for the video streaming site. What about Greyson Chance? He sang Lady Gaga’s “Paparazzi” and landed numerous talk show interviews along with a record deal.

  YouTube is essential for the entertainment world. It changes with the times. At one point the radio was the hip form of entertainment. Who knows? Maybe in a couple decades people will become famous for doing stupid, amusing things through holograms.

  Whatever the case is, entertainment is vital for society for many reasons. It needs to keep up with the times. YouTube has come to define the era of online video because it is so current.

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Boys’ basketball loses in semifinals of state tournament

Despite losing their semi-final tournament game against St. Mary’s of Lynn with a score of 77-64, the boys’ varsity basketball team is ending their season on an “excited” note, coach Duane Sigsbury said.

By Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

 Despite losing their semi-final tournament game against St. Mary’s of Lynn with a score of 77-64, the boys’ varsity basketball team is ending their season on an “excited” note, coach Duane Sigsbury said.

  The team won the Cape Ann League with a record of 12-1, and an overall record of 16-5.

   “We’re excited about having such a great record and defeating big schools like North Andover and Wilmington. We played an extremely aggressive non-league schedule. We actually had the best record as such a small school,” Sigsbury said.

   The tournament game against St. Mary’s resulted in a mix of emotions from the entire team, including Sigsbury.

Senior captain Joseph Mussachia believes it was just simply not their night.

  “Any team could have been out there making the shots; it just wasn’t us that night. It was St. Mary’s,” Mussachia said.

  Sigsbury said, “We didn’t play the way we did the past 8-10 games. It was a strange game.” He added, “It’s always tough to lose your last game.  That’ll stick with them but that shouldn’t be the case.”

  Sigsbury hopes the seniors will focus on the accomplishments throughout the season, not losing the game.

  “We’ve accomplished so much. I love those kids. Going to practice next year and not seeing them will be tough,” he said.

  Senior captain Alex Carr will remember his last year as an achievement.

  “I love my team. We accomplished so much by winning the Cape Ann.”

  Because of the loss of six players, Sigsbury’s plans for next year include a new laying strategy. Junior captain Sean Nally agreed.

  “We have to play differently now with most of our height gone.”

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Boys’ basketball qualifies for Cape Ann League tournament, finds success in ‘working as a team’

With an overall record of 11-4 and a Cape Ann record of 8-1, the varsity boys’ basketball team has qualified for the Cape Ann tournament, which starts the week after February break.

By Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  With an overall record of 11-4 and a Cape Ann record of 8-1, the varsity boys’ basketball team has qualified for the Cape Ann tournament, which starts the week after February break.

  Out of the first three games, the Hornets had lost two against Georgetown High School and St. Mary’s of Lynn. The Hornets won every consecutive game afterwards except against Masconomet.

  “We started out rough because we didn’t know how to move the ball, and we lost Porter,” said junior captain Sean Nally, referring to senior captain Alex Porter, who suffered a hand injury in late December and, until mid January, was unable to play. 

  “After watching the first game that I didn’t play in, it motivated me to work on my dribbling and agility. I wanted to be able to play at the same level right when I got back,” Porter said.

  According to Nally the team “needed to learn how to play without Porter.”

  “He’s just one of the best players in the league. When he came back, though, it was a huge boost for us again. We also learned how to play better as a team,” senior captain Alex Carr said.

  Coach Duane Sigsbury agreed. “Being a team is all about stepping up to the plate when one player is down. Junior Chris Bishop did a great job stepping up for Porter during his hand injury,” he said.

  “I can’t say there are players that stand out anymore because we are so focused on working as a team,” he added.

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With 3-6 record, football team falls short of playoffs, ‘improved as a team’ throughout season

By losing their game against Shawsheen High School, the football team lost their spot in the league playoffs with a score of 48-0.

Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT ASSISTANT EDITOR

By losing their game against Shawsheen High School, the football team lost their spot in the league playoffs with a score of 48-0.

  With a regular record of 3-6 and league record of 3-2, the Hornets lost two league games to Shawsheen High School and Greater Lawrence. They won three games against Lynn Vocational Technical School, Whittier Technical, and Greater Lowell.

  “I felt terrible at the end of the Shawsheen game; we lost to a much better team. We had a lot of tough breaks in that game, but still played really hard,” Carr said.

  According to senior captain Matt Wescott, with the loss of 18 senior players, towards the beginning of the season, the team struggled.

  Assistant coach and previous Hornets football player Drew Burnham agreed.

  “We were a young team when we started, we still are, but at least we tried our hardest. Our score may look like we fell short, but I think we gained a lot as a whole,” Burnham said.

  “We improved hugely as the season went on. If you compare us to the first week of practice, we are a completely changed team. Everyone has improved, and we are overall a better team,” sophomore Brian McAuliff said.

  Captains Carr and Wescott saw major potential in juniors Paul Pennoyer and David Wright, and McAuliff.

  “Paul and David are merciless on the line. They’re amazing at defense. Brian stepped up as a sophomore. He plays extremely hard,” Carr said.

   Carr plans on winning their last game on Thanksgiving against Georgetown.

“It’s the last game for the seniors; Georgetown is a major rival. We have to win.”

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