Eighth graders participate in Shakespearean theatre workshop

Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class is currently doing a unit on Macbeth. As part of this unit, five members of Shakespeare & Company, a theatre troupe based in the Berkshire town of Lenox, visited MERMS to host a theatre workshop for her students.

Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company leads eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante’s class in a warm-up, involving various forms of exercise. In the days leading up to the theatre workshop, Shakespeare & Company performed Hamlet for the middle school, in which Reed played the title role. “I contacted them to see if we could attend a play that they were staging,” Plante said, “and that play was Hamlet. And then in speaking to them I learned that they could also come to our school and do workshops, and rather than spending the money getting the kids out to the Berkshires, we thought we would invite the troupe, have them stage the play here, and conduct workshops at each grade level. So I had to write a grant for that, and that took a lot of time and energy, but it was totally worth it!” She has submitted another grant for Shakespeare & Company to come again next year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company leads eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante’s class in a warm-up, involving various forms of exercise. In the days leading up to the theatre workshop, Shakespeare & Company performed Hamlet for the middle school, in which Reed played the title role. “I contacted them to see if we could attend a play that they were staging,” Plante said, “and that play was Hamlet. And then in speaking to them I learned that they could also come to our school and do workshops, and rather than spending the money getting the kids out to the Berkshires, we thought we would invite the troupe, have them stage the play here, and conduct workshops at each grade level. So I had to write a grant for that, and that took a lot of time and energy, but it was totally worth it!” She has submitted another grant for Shakespeare & Company to come again next year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In another part of the warm-up, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class is divided into two rival tribes, who are locked in heated battle as they discover that they are each other’s long-lost siblings. Plante discovered the company over the summer while searching for resources to help her teach Macbeth in class. She believes they are a rare combination in theatre education  – “they know Shakespeare and can perform him well,” and “they know students and can work with them well.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In another part of the warm-up, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class is divided into two rival tribes, who are locked in heated battle as they discover that they are each other’s long-lost siblings. Plante discovered the company over the summer while searching for resources to help her teach Macbeth in class. She believes they are a rare combination in theatre education – “they know Shakespeare and can perform him well,” and “they know students and can work with them well.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Later on in the warm-up, Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company, who played the title role in their production of Hamlet, orders the classmates into a circle and calls on students to recite a famous Shakespeare soliloquy. When the students are called on, they must repeat a motion Reed assigns them, such as doing jumping jacks or running in place. When asked why she chose Macbeth out of Shakespeare’s thirty-five plays, Plante said, “Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s four best known tragedies. It’s also his shortest play, and it’s set during feudal times, so it ties in with what Mr. Thomas is teaching in his history class. We wanted something that we could integrate into the current setting but would be accessible for students.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Later on in the warm-up, Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company orders the classmates into a circle and calls on students to recite a famous Shakespeare soliloquy. When the students are called on, they must repeat a motion Reed assigns them, such as doing jumping jacks or running in place. When asked why she chose Macbeth out of Shakespeare’s thirty-five plays, Plante said, “Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s four best known tragedies. It’s also his shortest play, and it’s set during feudal times, so it ties in with what Mr. Thomas is teaching in his history class. We wanted something that we could integrate into the current setting but would be accessible for students.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the five members of Shakespeare & Company divide the Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class into groups, they hand them each a different series of fragmented lines from pivotal scenes in Macbeth. Plante’s group works together to decide how they will act out this scene in front of the class, using only these lines, a few props, and the combined imagination of her students. The theater workshops were organized in groups of up to fifty students. “We took the eighth grade and divided them up into three groups at three stations,” Plante said. “A group would attend the workshop while the other two were doing an MCAS review activity and a third team choice activity, which happened at each grade level.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the five members of Shakespeare & Company divide the Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class into groups, they hand them each a different series of fragmented lines from pivotal scenes in Macbeth. Plante’s group works together to decide how they will act out this scene in front of the class, using only these lines, a few props, and the combined imagination of her students. The theater workshops were organized in groups of up to fifty students. “We took the eighth grade and divided them up into three groups at three stations,” Plante said. “A group would attend the workshop while the other two were doing an MCAS review activity and a third team choice activity, which happened at each grade level.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once they had decided how they would act out their scene, each group took some time to rehearse it. Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company watches as his group practices for the group performance. According to eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante, the student feedback regarding the workshops was very positive. “My students said that they thought that the actors interacted well with them, and that they made it fun for everyone,” she said, sharing results from a class survey. “They thought the opening warm-up was a great way to break the ice and move people outside their comfort zone. They felt the actors were outgoing and helped them take risks while they were acting, and they thought that moving from a large group to a small group was a great way to manage things. They also loved the presentation of Hamlet. They thought that it was cool that they added so much humor to it, they found it interesting, and they thought each actor did a great job building a specific personality for each character.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once they had decided how they would act out their scene, each group took some time to rehearse it. Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company watches as his group practices for the group performance. According to eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante, the student feedback regarding the workshops was very positive. “My students said that they thought that the actors interacted well with them, and that they made it fun for everyone,” she said, sharing results from a class survey. “They thought the opening warm-up was a great way to break the ice and move people outside their comfort zone. They felt the actors were outgoing and helped them take risks while they were acting, and they thought that moving from a large group to a small group was a great way to manage things. They also loved the presentation of Hamlet. They thought that it was cool that they added so much humor to it, they found it interesting, and they thought each actor did a great job building a specific personality for each character.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class performance has begun. Before each group presents their scene from Macbeth, Ally Allen of Shakespeare & Company (who played Ophelia in their production of Hamlet) provides some context regarding the plot, setting, and characters so it is less confusing to the class, which has not yet finished the cursed “Scottish Play.” The Shakespeare unit, of course, is not confined to the auditorium, and in the classroom, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class does some interpretation of the characters through acting, some prop analysis by looking at which characters could be connected to certain props, and reading the play and engaging in Socratic circles. “They’re very much like a typical small group question-and-answer, except we do it as a larger group,” she said. “Sometimes it’s half the class, sometimes it’s the whole class. The students start by posing a question, and other students answer. Then, they move on to additional questions, often generating their own meaning of the text in a discussion that’s not teacher-led or directed.” Shakespeare also uses a lot of dramatic irony in setting up the story, and according to Plante, “there are places where the play becomes more engaging because we can see how it’s going to unfold.” Her class often talks about the rhetorical devices of pathos, logos, and ethos, and applies them to several scenes in the play. Plante is also interested in “the theme of fate versus free will” and “how the characters distinctly represent their ideas, what their motivations are, and how they change.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class performance has begun. Before each group presents their scene from Macbeth, Ally Allen of Shakespeare & Company (who played Ophelia in their production of Hamlet) provides some context regarding the plot, setting, and characters so it is less confusing to the class, which has not yet finished the cursed “Scottish Play.” The Shakespeare unit, of course, is not confined to the auditorium, and in the classroom, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class does some interpretation of the characters through acting, some prop analysis by looking at which characters could be connected to certain props, and reading the play and engaging in Socratic circles. “They’re very much like a typical small group question-and-answer, except we do it as a larger group,” she said. “Sometimes it’s half the class, sometimes it’s the whole class. The students start by posing a question, and other students answer. Then, they move on to additional questions, often generating their own meaning of the text in a discussion that’s not teacher-led or directed.” Shakespeare also uses a lot of dramatic irony in setting up the story, and according to Plante, “there are places where the play becomes more engaging because we can see how it’s going to unfold.” Her class often talks about the rhetorical devices of pathos, logos, and ethos, and applies them to several scenes in the play. Plante is also interested in “the theme of fate versus free will” and “how the characters distinctly represent their ideas, what their motivations are, and how they change.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

A group of students from Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class recite to the auditorium their rendition of Macbeth’s final soliloquy, one of the most famous speeches in the English language. When asked what she enjoyed the most about having Shakespeare & Company host theatre workshops at MERMS, Plante said, “Their rapport with students was strong, but I think they had a strong rapport with each other. And so after the workshops, I said to my students, ‘Did you enjoy how much they enjoyed what they were doing?’ I wish for my students that whatever they choose in their futures, they can be as appreciative and engaged in what they do,  because the sheer joy that they brought to Shakespeare and to working with kids was contagious.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group of students from Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class recite to the auditorium their rendition of Macbeth’s final soliloquy, one of the most famous speeches in the English language. When asked what she enjoyed the most about having Shakespeare & Company host theatre workshops at MERMS, Plante said, “Their rapport with students was strong, but I think they had a strong rapport with each other. And so after the workshops, I said to my students, ‘Did you enjoy how much they enjoyed what they were doing?’ I wish for my students that whatever they choose in their futures, they can be as appreciative and engaged in what they do, because the sheer joy that they brought to Shakespeare and to working with kids was contagious.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Advisory strengthens bonds with group activities

On Wednesday, May 6th, high school advisory groups take advantage of the warm weather by spending their 30 minute period outside. Students play football, Frisbee, and other engaging activities to help increase group bonding. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Sophomore Noah Smith tosses the Frisbee to fellow classmates. High school advisory’s take place more than 10 times each year. Usually students work with advisors about academic and social issues. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Noah Smith tosses the Frisbee to fellow classmates. High school advisory’s take place more than 10 times each year. Usually students work with advisors about academic and social issues. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Junior Cassandra Gonser plays football with the rest of her advisory class. Other students enjoy the warm weather and soak up the sunshine. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Cassandra Gonser plays football with the rest of her advisory class. Other students enjoy the warm weather and soak up the sunshine. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Freshman girls gather in social circle during the high school advisory. Other students participated in throwing Frisbees and footballs. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman girls gather in social circle during the high school advisory. Other students participated in throwing Frisbees and footballs. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Sophomore boys prepare to play Apples to Apples on the football field.Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore boys prepare to play Apples to Apples on the football field.Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Humans Of Manchester Essex: Week 4

Inspired by the photo project Humans Of New York by Brandon Stanton comes a new photo series captured by senior Courtney MacDougall. Humans Of Manchester Essex takes a deeper look at the lives of Manchester Essex’s students.

 

" Apples are my favorite fruit."
” Apples are my favorite fruit.”
"What is your favorite thing about being in a theatre production?"  "Probably the people in it. They are very comfortable and easy to talk to."
“What is your favorite thing about being in a theatre production?”
“Probably the people in it. They are very comfortable and easy to talk to.”
"My favorite Iphone app is Instagram."
“My favorite Iphone app is Instagram.”
"Would you rather eat peanut butter off a hobos foot or be stuck in a cage with a lion?"  "Well, I don't like peanut butter, so I'm going to have to go with the lion."
“Would you rather eat peanut butter off a stranger’s foot or be stuck in a cage with a lion?”
“Well, I don’t like peanut butter, so I’m going to have to go with the lion.”
"This summer I am most looking forward to riding my bike around town."
“This summer I am most looking forward to riding my bike around town.”

" I really really really like Harry Potter"
” I really really really like Harry Potter”

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English class begins reading “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

Allison Krause’s  10th grade CP English class begins to read “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain. This novel raises extreme controversy over its use of the N-word over 200 times throughout the book. Some English classes in America have switched to a modified version of the book were the N-word is replaced with the word slave each time it is used. After reading the book, the class will be required to write a 4 page paper arguing whether the book promotes or condemns racism.

Students review worksheets that will need to be completed for the major paper at the end of the novel. The worksheet will include quotes from the text that either promote racism or condemn it. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
Students review worksheets that will need to be completed for the major paper at the end of the novel. The worksheet will include quotes from the text that either promote racism or condemn it. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
English teacher Allison Krause clarifies to the class what will be expected when writing about an extremely controversial book such as “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The paper will need to be at least 4 pages long and argue that the book either promotes racism or condemns it. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
English teacher Allison Krause clarifies to the class what will be expected when writing about an extremely controversial book such as “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The book is set before the Civil War and is about a boy who is traveling with an runaway slave to the free states farther north. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.

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Sophomore Jennifer Beardsley begins to read “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The English CP class has begun to read this controversial novel in preparation for a major four page paper. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
Sophomore Jennifer Beardsley begins to read “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The English CP class has begun to read this controversial novel in preparation for a major four page paper. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
The class reviews the website librovox.com for free audio book recordings on each chapter of Huckleberry Finn. Audio books for Huckleberry Finn are also found on Youtube.com. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
The class reviews the website librovox.com for free audio book recordings on each chapter of Huckleberry Finn. Audio books for Huckleberry Finn are also found on Youtube.com. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.

 

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Physical Education Classes Enjoy the Warm Weather

Thursday April 30th students in Eric Magers high school gym class and students in Kathleen Pizzello middle school gym class play outside. The middle school class played Frisbee and prepared for their ultimate Frisbee unit. The high school class played two hand touch, while students inside played four square. 20150430_Jenny Ainsley high school Gym Class_0710

After the turnover from Williams, Nowak throws the ball down the field to teammates. The pass was received by sophomore Mac McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the turnover from Williams, Nowak throws the ball down the field to teammates. The pass was received by sophomore Mac McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade students in Kathleen Pizzello’s gym class practice passing the Frisbee before beginning their unit on ultimate Frisbee. Eighth grader Suzy Morton passes to her partner. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade students in Kathleen Pizzello’s gym class practice passing the Frisbee before beginning their unit on ultimate Frisbee. Eighth grader Suzy Morton passes to her partner. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students had to be aware of their surroundings while throwing Frisbees because of the hazard of hitting other students. Eighth grader Anna Bonaccorso begins her throw in the correct form. Students are advised every day to change for class, otherwise they cannot participate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students had to be aware of their surroundings while throwing Frisbees because of the hazard of hitting other students. Eighth grader Anna Bonaccorso begins her throw in the correct form. Students are advised every day to change for class, otherwise they cannot participate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle schooler Jake Athanas catches the Frisbee and with a quick release returns the disc to his parter. Athanas said Frisbee is one  of his favorite units. It was a perfect spring day to be outside for class. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle schooler Jake Athanas catches the Frisbee and with a quick release returns the disc to his parter. Athanas said Frisbee is one of his favorite units. It was a perfect spring day to be outside for class. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello begins to explain the rules of ultimate Frisbee to her students. Students look toward the boundaries and begin to look for their teams. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello begins to explain the rules of ultimate Frisbee to her students. Students look toward the boundaries and begin to look for their teams. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Milne runs back to his position after his team scored a touchdown. The sophomores then decide to create a game plan on how to win their game. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Milne runs back to his position after his team scored a touchdown. The sophomores then decide to create a game plan on how to win their game. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Aisea Richardson and Evan Williams run a play. Williams hands off to Richardson and he then runs the field to get the touchdown. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Aisea Richardson and Evan Williams run a play. Williams hands off to Richardson and he then runs the field to get the touchdown. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams passes the ball to the end of the field in a Hail Mary in hopes he will get a touchdown pass. The ball is picked off by Milne and then is two hand touched by McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams passes the ball to the end of the field in a Hail Mary in hopes he will get a touchdown pass. The ball is picked off by Milne and then is two hand touched by McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams runs the ball between McCoy and Richardson. He does not make it through and got a turn over to the other team. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams runs the ball between McCoy and Richardson. He does not make it through and got a turn over to the other team. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Richardson with an illegal move is put on a two minute penalty. Students with penalties had to stand with Magers and cheering on  their teammates. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Richardson with an illegal move is put on a two minute penalty. Students with penalties had to stand with Magers and cheering on their teammates. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Pizzello explains the boundaries and rules of the game of ultimate Frisbee. Students sat in a circle listening to how to play. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello explains the boundaries and rules of the game of ultimate Frisbee. Students sat in a circle listening to how to play. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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JV girls lacrosse takes down Gloucester

Manchester-Essex’s JV girls lacrosse team faced off against Gloucester High School’s JV team and won 11-4.

Eighth grader, Lily Pulver, sets up to take the draw against Gloucester’s starting center. Pulver scored 3 goals in the game making her one of the top scorers. Credit: Clara Tuttle for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader, Lily Pulver, sets up to take the draw against Gloucester’s starting center. Pulver scored 3 goals in the game making her one of the top scorers. Credit: Clara Tuttle for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
JV coach Jess Thompson watches the game play out. Thompson has said that each year, the JV team gets better and better with every batch of new players. Credit: Clara Tuttle for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
JV coach Jess Thompson watches the game play out. Thompson has said that each year, the JV team gets better and better with every batch of new players. Credit: Clara Tuttle for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman, Bennett Dolan, transitions the ball down the field. Dolan has been playing lacrosse for the last 6 years on both the Hamilton-Wenham and the Manchester-Essex team. Credit: Clara Tuttle for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman, Bennett Dolan, transitions the ball down the field. Dolan has been playing lacrosse for the last 6 years on both the Hamilton-Wenham and the Manchester-Essex team. Credit: Clara Tuttle for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Manchester-Essex player jog off the field for half time. Because Manchester-Essex had such a dominant lead in the game at this point, Coach Thompson decided to switch up the players’ positions to let them try new things on the field. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Manchester-Essex player jog off the field for half time. Because Manchester-Essex had such a dominant lead in the game at this point, Coach Thompson decided to switch up the players’ positions to let them try new things on the field. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Gloucester’s team meets at half time to talk about the game. The Manchester-Essex varsity girls’ lacrosse team beat the Gloucester varsity team 11-0. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Gloucester’s team meets at half time to talk about the game. The Manchester-Essex varsity girls’ lacrosse team beat the Gloucester varsity team 11-0. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coach Thompson talks to the team at half time. In the second half, Gloucester made a slight comeback, scoring 3 out of the 4 goals they made in the game. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coach Thompson talks to the team at half time. In the second half, Gloucester made a slight comeback, scoring 3 out of the 4 goals they made in the game. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The team gets ready and cheers before the start of the second half. Some of the players have said games where Manchester-Essex beats other schools by a large number aren’t as fun because they aren’t challenged athletically. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The team gets ready and cheers before the start of the second half. Some of the players have said games where Manchester-Essex beats other schools by a large number aren’t as fun because they aren’t challenged athletically. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Middle School Students Observe Shakespeare’s Hamlet

This performance done by Shakespeare & Company is a well-known play that is preformed yearly around this time. Shakespeare & Company is located in Lenox, Massachusetts and every year thousands of students participate in these performances.  Middle school students were invited to the auditorium to watch Hamlet to then discuss their thoughts on the play.

Shakespeare & Co. has their costume rack backstage ready so the cast can quickly change. Throughout the play cast members made quick changes to get ready for the next scene. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shakespeare & Co. has their costume rack backstage ready so the cast can quickly change. Throughout the play cast members made quick changes to get ready for the next scene. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Wife of Hamlet steps out on stage expressing her worry for her husband. Students said this played with their emotions and increased the suspense in the play.  Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Wife of Hamlet steps out on stage expressing her worry for her husband. Students said this played with their emotions and increased the suspense in the play. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
All of the middle school students sit quietly in the auditorium seats watching the play. Shakespeare & Company usually preforms for most underclassmen or elementary students but also can preform for any age. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
All of the middle school students sit quietly in the auditorium seats watching the play. Shakespeare & Company usually preforms for most underclassmen or elementary students but also can preform for any age. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shakespeare & Co. displays their set from Hamlet. This Company is well known for their set design and reviewers say their elaborate set design and music creates a well-rounded performance. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shakespeare & Co. displays their set from Hamlet. This Company is well known for their set design and reviewers say their elaborate set design and music creates a well-rounded performance. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school students enter the cafeteria during F block to view the play. Many 6th 7th and 8th grade students said they enjoyed the suspense and plot of Hamlet. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school students enter the cafeteria during F block to view the play. Many 6th 7th and 8th grade students said they enjoyed the suspense and plot of Hamlet. Credit: Caroline Francoeur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In scene four of the play Hamlet, characters Prince Hamlet and Horatio are having a fight with swords. Shakespeare and company has been around for over 10 years. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In scene four of the play Hamlet, characters Prince Hamlet and Horatio are having a fight with swords. Shakespeare and company has been around for over 10 years. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The creature in the play came out of a mysterious door and scared many in the audience. The character had a voice auditor therefore greatening the dramatic effect. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The creature in the play came out of a mysterious door and scared many in the audience. The character had a voice auditor therefore greatening the dramatic effect. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Hamlet enters the stage sharing a dialogue with the strange creature. During this scene the audience was taken by surprise by the volume of the characters voices. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hamlet enters the stage sharing a dialogue with the strange creature. During this scene the audience was taken by surprise by the volume of the characters voices. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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UPCOMING EVENT: A CAPPELLA NIGHT 2015 – Thursday, April 30th at 7:00 PM

A CAPPELLA NIGHT 2015 – Thursday, April 30th at 7:00 PM – MERHS Auditorium

The SoundWaves perform with and host: Boston University’s AFIX (with alumna Leanne Ciccone); Pingree’s Specttrum Highlights; Marblehead’s Jewel Tones; Marblehead’s Luminesence; and Hamilton-Wenham’s Kings of the Beach. 

 

Tickets go on sale Tuesday, April 28th.

PLEASE COME AND JOIN US!

$5.00 students, faculty and senior citizens; $8.00 general public.

Proceeds to benefit the MERHS Class of 2015.

 

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Baseball captains Carter Cirone hope to lead team to tournament

Leading the baseball team under new coaching this season are senior captains Craig Carter and Dominic Cirone.

Cirone and Carter bring experience to the team because they have each played on the team all four years of their high school career. Both have played even longer through town leagues.

“I started playing baseball when I was 4, but I didn’t start playing the organized game until I was 6 and joined Little League,” Carter said.

Cirone, who has been playing the sport since he was 5, said that the town league is important to developing young talent.

“Playing through middle school helped me get to know the sport and work on aspects of my game that needed work,” he said.

On the field, Carter described himself as a utility player, one who can play nearly any position if he is needed.

“I can play different positions depending on the game situation; anywhere from right field, third base, first base, or pitching,” he said.

Cirone stated that he also plays a variety of positions if needed such as catcher, pitcher, second base, and short stop.

“I think it’s important to be versatile, especially with our new coach this year it makes his job easier if he has a lot of options to choose from,” Cirone said.

According to Carter, the team’s goals are to qualify for the state tournament and “ultimately make a run for the title.” Cirone agreed with this goal and also said he wants to “create a reputation for the team that will make younger athletes enthusiastic to play.”

After high school, Carter will attend the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, but he has yet to decide whether he will play a sport in college. He has the option to participate in any of the three he played in high school: baseball, basketball, or football.

Cirone plans to try out for the baseball team of whichever school he attends in the fall. Even if he doesn’t make the team, he wants some association with the sport.

Head coach James Weed said his captains will be his largest asset going forward, as they know the team and can help him get to know its strengths and weaknesses.

 

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Next Year’s updated schedule warrants a need for advisory changes

Due to the separating the middle and high school schedules, the current system of advisory calls for change, according to Principal Patricia Puglisi.

Puglisi explained the origins of turbo advisory as a result from the converging schedules of the middle school and high school.

“When we implemented advisory, the high school schedule was paired up with the middle school schedule. Since the middle school gets out at 11:32 a.m., and the high school doesn’t get out until 2:15 p.m., there needed to be a schedule that would match for the shared staff. So we created this turbo advisory block which was two hours and 30 minutes of something different,” she said.

Currently the turbo advisory days are planned ahead of time; however, Puglisi said the prescheduling of advisory should change once the middle and high school schedules separate next year.

“If we find we want to do a particular event, then we can just do that at a time when it seems needed,” she said.

Following the prescheduled calendar, a 2 hour and 30 minute turbo advisory was held on March 18, when the students took a Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance (YRBS) survey, and participated in The Pages Project, which is an art project Ms. Powers and the National Art Honors Society configured. With leftover time, the grades compete against other grades in trivial games.

However, the most recent Turbo Advisory had scarce attendance, specifically senior students, according to Principal Puglisi.

“A bunch of my friends didn’t come to school that day, and I don’t really blame them. It’s not like anything substantial could be taught in the half hour classes, and there clearly wasn’t much importance to those games we played afterwards,” senior Meghan Conway said.

Sophomore Annabelle Lord-Patey said she thought that advisory was important for each class.

“I don’t have any classes with some of the kids in my advisory. Advisory is a welcome break from schoolwork, and I get to see other people in my grade whom I don’t normally,” she said.

The advisory scheduling was discussed recently, according to Puglisi, and there have been adjustments made to the schedule for the rest of the year.

“The rest of the school year will be the half an hour advisories. June 3rd scheduled to have an Turbo advisory, but we have decided against that and to have a full day of school that week, mainly because it is graduation week and it’s a difficult date to manage,” Puglisi said.

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