Unusual amounts of snow warrant disposal on Singing Beach

Although it may receive criticism for its environmental harms, disposing of snow on Singing Beach in extreme cases, such as this winter, is a necessary action.

The excessive snow this year caused many problems for Manchester.

Students cannot walk to school because of covered sidewalks, causing lines of traffic to get to school in the morning. This issue has pushed the start time of school instruction back around 15 minutes most mornings.

The snow also affected commutes for residents by negatively impacting the train system and the conditions of roads.

Drivers have difficulty looking around snow banks when making turns and passing other cars on narrow snow-lined streets.

The unsafe conditions on roads also affect the safety of runners on the track team, who use the roads to train.

“[Running] is definitely more dangerous. Exiting streets and taking turns on the roads can be blind for cars, which means we have to be very careful. Running on snow also allows for slipping, which could lead to injury,” senior captain Olivia Lantz said.

Most years, the snow has been placed in the Singing Beach parking lot.

“Many times the lot has been two-thirds full or three-fourths full, with some parking still available,” Tom Kehoe, chairman of the Board of Selectmen said in an email.

This year, however, the Singing Beach parking lot is full, as well as most of the Masconomo lot. Because of this, the town was forced to place snow on Singing Beach, where the tide can wash it away.

According to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the environmental issue with disposing of snow on the beach is that it is not just snow, but also dirt, trash, and pollutants that are swept up with it. However, the town worked to minimize this negative effect.

“The snow disposed of on the beach was clean.  There was very little salt or sand in this snow, and it had not sat long in areas where it picked up heavy metals or other contaminants from vehicles,” Carol Murray, the department of public works director, said in an email.

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AP Government Runs Mock Election

During the last week of October and heading into November, the AP Government class, led by history Jen Coleman, has been encouraging students to take part in a school-run mock election. Posters and signs have been hung on the walls of all floors informing the students about the candidates. The mock election took place throughout the day on November 3rd. The election results in our school Charlie Baker won for governor, Seth Moulton for US representative, and the bottle bill tied.

Junior Mara Franklin takes part in organizing students for the voting process of the mock election. She records the names of high school students who want to fill out a ballot.  Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Mara Franklin takes part in organizing students for the voting process of the mock election. She records the names of high school students who want to fill out a ballot. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Half-sheet ballots are given to students of all classes in the high school who signed up to vote. Junior Olivia Tyler takes a few minutes between lunches to complete the form. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Half-sheet ballots are given to students of all classes in the high school who signed up to vote. Junior Olivia Tyler takes a few minutes between lunches to complete the form. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During third lunch, junior students Kelly Finnerty and Charlotte Freed listen to the AP Government students regarding the mock election. The elections ran prior to the first bell of the school day and during all three lunches. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During third lunch, junior students Kelly Finnerty and Charlotte Freed listen to the AP Government students regarding the mock election. The elections ran prior to the first bell of the school day and during all three lunches. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The AP government students, acting as election officials, help sophomore voter Robert Carter at the check in located in Jennifer Coleman’s classroom. All high school students were encouraged to vote and the officials kept a census of how many students voted from each class came to vote. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The AP government students, acting as election officials, help sophomore voter Robert Carter at the check in located in Jennifer Coleman’s classroom. All high school students were encouraged to vote and the officials kept a census of how many students voted from each class came to vote. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the first floor hallway and outside of AP government teacher Jennifer Coleman’s room, were signs directing voters to the election room. Once the voters arrived at the classroom, they were assisted by the AP students who gave them the details for voting. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the first floor hallway and outside of AP government teacher Jennifer Coleman’s room, were signs directing voters to the election room. Once the voters arrived at the classroom, they were assisted by the AP students who gave them the details for voting. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After receiving the ballot, students could pick from a series of voting booths placed around the room. At their booth, voters had the option to decide between Charlie Baker or Martha Coakley for governor and Seth Moulton or Richard Tisei for congress. They also got to choose to vote in favor of the bottle bill or against it. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After receiving the ballot, students could pick from a series of voting booths placed around the room. At their booth, voters had the option to decide between Charlie Baker or Martha Coakley for governor and Seth Moulton or Richard Tisei for congress. They also got to choose to vote in favor of the bottle bill or against it. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior election official Troy Ciarametaro watches over the ballot boxes as sophomore Amber Pare places her votes in the box. Ciarametaro was in charge of the ballot box and handing out voting stickers to all the voters to show the appreciation for all that voted. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior election official Troy Ciarametaro watches over the ballot boxes as sophomore Amber Pare places her votes in the box. Ciarametaro was in charge of the ballot box and handing out voting stickers to all the voters to show the appreciation for all that voted. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

In the week leading up to the election, students involved in the mock election put up posters and pictures to get support for their candidate as well as spread the pros and cons of the bottle bill. A yes vote on the bottle bill will increase the money received when recycling a bottle but it will also drive up the bottle price the same amount.  Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In the week leading up to the election, students involved in the mock election put up posters and pictures to get support for their candidate as well as spread the pros and cons of the bottle bill. A yes vote on the bottle bill will increase the money received when recycling a bottle but it will also drive up the bottle price the same amount. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Style in the Halls: Senior Style

Senior students of Manchester Essex Regional High School show off their amazing style for the last time in a Style in the Halls story.

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Euthanasia enables suicide,tragedy, should not be legalized

By Fiona Davis

  Euthanasia on the surface seems to suggest a peaceful end to a life of illness and strife; however, it has another side in its harsher synonym, Physician Assisted Suicide.

  Massachusetts voted “no” on the issue in 2012 when it appeared on the ballot, but the margin of victory for those who opposed euthanasia was slim at 51 to 49 percent.

  Passing a law to allow euthanasia is complicated because taking away someone’s life requires strict, clear guidelines and careful regulation. Often these guidelines prove too difficult to provide, as lawmakers must decide whether family should be consulted before someone chooses to end his or her life, or if an individual should undergo a psychological evaluation before making the decision, or even what the doctor’s role ought to be.

  With such a contentious issue that has so many variables, laws will ultimately be unable to sufficiently guard against people taking advantage of legalized suicide.

  Furthermore, if the law were to pass, other laws and moral codes would have to be drastically altered. Doctors swear to a code of ethics, one that prohibits them from harming a patient or neglecting their duty to put forth their best effort to heal the person.

  The idea of “doing no harm” is rooted in the Hippocratic Oath that doctors have professed since ancient times. Because ending someone’s life is inherently harmful, doctors who issue drugs to allow euthanasia would violate this oath.

  Doctors prefer end of life care to euthanasia, according to the American Medical Association, because it allows them to fulfill their duties and provides the opportunity for recovery even when it is unlikely.

  Terminal illness is sometimes not a permanent diagnosis. Misdiagnosis or changes in treatment options mean that miraculous recoveries can occur, but choosing suicide based on a present condition or the opinion of one doctor ends all possibility for future developments.

  Many view euthanasia as a way out or a humane reprieve from physical suffering. On the contrary, suicide by people suffering from psychological illnesses is considered a tragedy. All suicide should remain a tragedy, not a way out, and instead of perpetuating it, laws should seek to prevent it.

 

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Students show disrespect at the Veteran’s Day assembly

Many audience members at the Veteran’s Day assembly showed that they were more interested in their smartphones and side conversations than the actual ceremony, disrespecting the speaker and America’s troops.

The assembly featured Lieutenant Colonel Robert Visnick, an Air Force JAG Corps member. Despite his lack of battlefield experience, he delivered a smart and patriotic speech. Visnick also demonstrated that he was a very skillful orator. In addition to the speech, high school band and chorus members performed a selection of patriotic numbers in front of the school.

Despite the engaging material, many students made it clear that conversations with friends and using phones were better alternatives. Kids in the audience could be heard loudly whispering with their friends and in many cases, seen using social media and playing games on smartphones.

The high school band and chorus worked hard and practiced for this event and deserved to be respected while they performed. Many of their peers apparently disagreed, remaining inattentive throughout the musical numbers.

Disregarding the fact that students should be paying attention to any Veteran’s Day event, students should welcome the assembly simply as a change from regular routine. An assembly with an entertaining and educational speech, not to mention musical performances,  is much more preferable to class.

Even if the material had been slow or boring, the day itself should have commanded the respect of the audience. Veteran’s Day is a day of respect by its very nature. It is a day to remember and be thankful for the sacrifices that our brave troops make for our country.

These very sacrifices allow us to go about our daily lives, and on the day to remember them, all that was asked from students was to pay attention to an assembly.

The disrespect present at the assembly shows that our generation cares more about small details of their own lives than honoring the men and women who sacrifice so much for the United States and its citizens.

VET memo pic Julia Breau and Emily Callahan photo

 

 

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School supports Danvers

  When Danvers High School reached out to school administration looking for educators to cover classes on the day of Danvers teacher Colleen Ritzer’s funeral, math department chair Daniel Lundergan, Principal Patricia Puglisi, history teacher James Walliman, and Spanish teacher Robert Bilsbury all volunteered to support Danvers. 

  “A lot of people volunteered to go help out…my son is a student at Danvers High, and I know a lot of the kids, and I thought it would be good for them to have a familiar face there…this was one very small way that we thought we could help them out,” Lundergan said.

  According to him, schools from across the North Shore sent teachers and posters to Danvers on Monday Oct. 28.

  “There were people from all over helping out…it helps the kids and the staff know that, yes, this is a tough time, but there are people on their side to help them get through it,” he said.

  Walliman, also a Danvers resident whose children are in the Danvers school system, said showing compassion to the Danvers community will aid in the healing process.

   “It is important, when you have the opportunity, to help people go through a healing process… we might be separated by town lines… but we are all humans,” Walliman said.

  Manchester Essex sophomore Sara Rhuda, a Danvers resident, said she was shocked to hear of the murder that happened in her own town, especially when she learned the accused killer, 14- year-old Phillip Chism, lived down the street from her.

  “It is a little bit too close to home… My neighbor came on the news and was saying she met the kid and

he lived next door. The kid actually lived on my street,” she said.

   According to Lundergan, from his point of view as both a teacher and a parent, the school responded well in light of the tragedy and had counselors ready to talk with students and teachers.

  “The communication was very clear…and the Danvers police and school department were very prepared for the situation,” he said.

  Outside Colleen Ritzer’s classroom, students were able to post notes on easels to begin the healing process, Lundergan said.

  “Most of the kids were pretty solemn and quiet on the day I was there…there is a lot of healing that has to go on… I think they are doing as well as can be expected,” he said.

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Would it be beneficial to have an extended day and no homework?

While school takes up a significant chunk of the average student’s day, homework is just as much of a burden as the actual school day. A longer school day and no homework would be more beneficial as opposed to the current setup because it allows students more free time away from school work.

Playing sports is a key factor that contributes to this issue. Many students are three season athletes, which adds at least another hour and a half to tack on to the day before students even start homework.

By this time, it’s around 4:30. Then, it’s on to homework. Other extracurricular activities can interfere as well. Most of the time, I have a snack after practice and need to shower, so now it’s even later to start homework. Given the amount of homework, it’s a struggle to be motivated to get through every assignment and get a good night’s sleep.

Having no homework after school will free up time to relax and unwind. Just an hour or two added on to the school day would allow students to work on homework in groups or ask the teacher for assistance with complicated questions.

A study done by Harvard Education Grad School cites examples of why too much homework or any homework at all is harmful to students. One principal of a school district in Gaithersburg, MD, cut homework out and just assigned reading for the children. They could read on their own or with an adult. This allowed the students to enjoy themselves and learn at the same time, according to the study.

As far as sports go, integrating sports into the day could be up to the discretion of the school. Even if practice is after the school day has ended, students wouldn’t have to worry about the stresses that come with homework. A lack of stress will most likely result in a better night’s sleep because students won’t have to fret about not finishing homework before midnight.

All students can relate to the discontent they feel about homework and the amount that is given…unless one finds happiness in a massive after school workload. Overall, a longer school day and no homework would be beneficial because students would have less stress and have an easier job of balancing their schedules.

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Seniors lack privileges

  Each year, senior privileges seem to dwindle, and this school year is no different.

  The senior wing and locker area disappeared after the move to the new high school building five years ago.

  To accommodate the need for more classroom space, the school converted the senior study hall room into a classroom two years ago.

  This year, seniors must share the outdoor lunch seating with the junior class.

  Sharing is not the problem from the perspective of most seniors. The core of the issue is that starting in freshman year, students look forward to the privileges they will be afforded in the last year of high school, only to be disappointed when those privileges do not materialize.

  Sitting outside at lunch is one of the few privileges left to seniors, and arriving at lunch to find the benches on the deck filled by juniors is frustrating.

  Often, seniors are relegated to the hallway or the community room where there is generally not enough seating for all of the seniors at a particular lunch.

  After completing three difficult years of high school, not to mention balancing a fourth year with the added stress of college applications, seniors deserve at least a small number of privileges as reward for dedication and hard work in the school community.

  One solution to this issue is for juniors to sit outside only if all of the seniors who want to sit outside already have seats.

  Besides, the only time seniors will want to sit outside is in the early fall, when the weather is warm enough. In the spring, seniors will be on SCORE, and juniors will be able to have the entire deck during lunches.

  Senior privileges add to the overall morale and sense of community within the senior class, attributes that are increasingly important as the time they have left together begins to fade.

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Mandatory athletic meetings become redundant

Student athletes attended their first mandatory athletic meeting of the school year on Sept. 7. Students later turned to Twitter, Facebook, and other social media to voice their discontent, as the meeting turned out to present the same information as it had in past seasons.

  The athletic office requires parents and student athletes to sit through three of these meetings, one Sunday night per season, to hear about MIAA rules that never seem to noticeably change.

  The meetings are approximately an hour and a half long; however, when added to the time athletes spend with their respective teams, the entire event takes about three hours.

  While the meetings do not get in the way of any specific activity, students and parents constantly ask why they must be subject to this inconvenience three times a year on the same material.

  This is especially inconvenient considering that the meetings are scheduled for Sunday night at the dinner hour, a time normally reserved for family.

  Athletic director Kelly Porcaro said she believes that the meetings are still necessary.

  “I understand that it’s a commitment and it’s hard for me to get to them too. But I think it’s so important for the program to make sure that everyone is on the same page and everybody has the information that they need,” she said.

  The redundancy of the meetings diminishes the impact of the message that the athletic department wishes to convey. The frequency leads many of the attendees, parents and students alike, to use their cell phones and whisper to one another while the information is being conveyed.

   One meeting a year is understandable, but three is excessive and dilutive.

 

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Should tattoos be socially acceptable?: CON

By Landon Komishane

  Tattoos have become a prominent part of popular culture in the United States and the world. However, tattoos reflect badly on society as a whole.

  The main argument against tattoos is the image of tattoos and how some people view them in society. Tattoos do not look good on people. The artwork may be appealing to the people getting them, but from the point of view of more conservative members of society, tattoos just look disgusting. The ink basically becomes the skin.

   Putting ink on skin creates a distraction from the actual person. People will see a different color on someone’s skin, and that will immediately detract from everything else on their body.

   The tattoo image has earned a negative reputation in American society; people view them as criminal because they are impulsive. Having a tattoo can affect someone in the job world. If someone sees something like a tattoo on an applicant, that applicant will not be hired because of the reputation tattoos have in society.

   Mistakes can also come when getting tattoos. If a girl foolishly decides to get a tattoo with their boyfriend’s name on it, she will feel very stupid when that relationship ends.

 The quality of tattoos also varies. Even when someone gets a tattoo, tattoo artists who aren’t experts can mess up, so that person will be regretting that decision when the tattoo artist spells a word wrong on their arm.

  Tattoos are not only bad for an image, but health concerns come with tattoos. They are painful to get on and even more painful to remove. Even if people want to endure that pain, they have possible risks with their health.

According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes, heart problems, and circulation issues are some of the health issues associated with the healing process of a tattoo. Tattoos can also produce skin infections in which the bacteria could result in tuberculosis.

  Tattoos are addictive as well. Once people get one tattoo, they want more and will end up getting multiple tattoos.

  The short-term effects may seem pleasant for the people who get tattoos, but they cannot escape the many negative long-term effects. Eventually, they will regret getting tattoos as the negatives keep piling up.

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