Girls tennis team practices at the Manchester Athletic Club

On March 31st, about a week before they are to play their first match, the girls’ tennis team practiced diligently in order to have a successful overall season. The team, which will be featuring many new and young players, lost four of their varsity teammates last year to graduation, while two other varsity players will not be returning.

The “Bubble” is a structure that covers the outdoor tennis courts at the Manchester Athletic Club (the MAC) so that they may be used during the winter. Because the school’s outdoor tennis courts remain beneath a layer of snow, both the boys and girls teams must often practice here, many times in the morning before school. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The “Bubble” is a structure that covers the outdoor tennis courts at the Manchester Athletic Club (the MAC) so that they may be used during the winter. Because the school’s outdoor tennis courts remain beneath a layer of snow, both the boys and girls teams must often practice here, many times in the morning before school. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once arriving at practice, all players write their name on a sign-in sheet so that attendance may be recorded each day. All players are expected to attend practice daily, whether it is at the MAC or in the exercise rooms at the school. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once arriving at practice, all players write their name on a sign-in sheet so that attendance may be recorded each day. All players are expected to attend practice daily, whether it is at the MAC or in the exercise rooms at the school. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before officially beginning practice, Coach Ken Rawson convenes his players to talk about strategy and the best and most efficient ways to win points. This is Rawson’s first year as both the varsity and junior varsity girls’ tennis coach. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before officially beginning practice, Coach Ken Rawson convenes his players to talk about strategy and the best and most efficient ways to win points. This is Rawson’s first year as both the varsity and junior varsity girls’ tennis coach. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Rawson and junior Mara Franklin rally with partners on the opposite side of the net in order to warm up. A typical tennis practice lasts between an hour and a half and two hours, with approximately 10 to 15 minutes of that time dedicated to warming up. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Rawson and junior Mara Franklin rally with partners on the opposite side of the net in order to warm up. A typical tennis practice lasts between an hour and a half and two hours, with approximately 10 to 15 minutes of that time dedicated to warming up. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle schools students Rebecca Shan, Naomi Franklin, and Andrea Rennie play a brief doubles game as a warm up. This year, due to a smaller high school team, middle school students are permitted to be play on the varsity level. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle schools students Rebecca Shan, Naomi Franklin, and Andrea Rennie play a brief doubles game as a warm up. This year, due to a smaller high school team, middle school students are permitted to be play on the varsity level. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Carlson and Finnerty, engage in a doubles drill while the rest of their teammates wait in line behind them. All junior varsity players play doubles, while two out of the five varsity matches played during matches are also doubles. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Carlson and Finnerty engage in a doubles drill while the rest of their teammates wait in line behind them. All junior varsity players play doubles, while two out of the five varsity matches played during matches are also doubles. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Eighth graders get a taste of South American culture with Ecuadorian breakfast

Doris-Ann Vosseler hosts an Ecuadorian breakfast for her eighth grade Spanish class ever year during International Week. This event gives her students an opportunity to practice the skills they have learned while experiencing the culture of South America through its delicious breakfast foods.

Eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler welcomes her students to this year’s Ecuadorian breakfast, which she hosts for all her Spanish classes. For her French class, she hosts a Parisian breakfast. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler welcomes her students to this year’s Ecuadorian breakfast, which she hosts for all her Spanish classes. For her French class, she hosts a Parisian breakfast. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sweet rolls (el pan dulce), all types of fruits (las frutas), and fruit juices (los jugos de fruta) are all lined up on a table in the eighth grade foreign language classroom, waiting to be eaten. Eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler chose Ecuador because it is the focus of chapters eight and nine of her class’s textbook, ¡Ven Comigo! “In chapter eight,” she said, “the students study a lot about different foods, meals, and restaurant etiquette in Ecuador.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sweet rolls (el pan dulce), all types of fruits (las frutas), and fruit juices (los jugos de fruta) are all lined up on a table in the eighth grade foreign language classroom, waiting to be eaten. Eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler chose Ecuador because it is the focus of chapters eight and nine of her class’s textbook, ¡Ven Comigo! “In chapter eight,” she said, “the students study a lot about different foods, meals, and restaurant etiquette in Ecuador.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group of students from the eighth grade Spanish class try to decide which of the many delicious foods they will eat this morning. Unlike in past years, eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler asked students to bring in food for the Ecuadorian breakfast. During the first few years of the event, she would stay up late to bake all the sweet rolls and cut up all the fruit, and bring in all the food, juice, and paper products to school early in the morning. “After five years,” she said, “I realized this was too exhausting for me!” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group of students from the eighth grade Spanish class try to decide which of the many delicious foods they will eat this morning. Unlike in past years, eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler asked students to bring in food for the Ecuadorian breakfast. During the first few years of the event, she would stay up late to bake all the sweet rolls and cut up all the fruit, and bring in all the food, juice, and paper products to school early in the morning. “After five years,” she said, “I realized this was too exhausting for me!” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Five girls from the eighth grade Spanish class enjoy their delicious South American meal. According to eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler, having students bring in food items this year proved itself to be a change for the better. “When the students brought in the food and paper products, the students seemed even more excited and involved in the breakfast,” she said “They really took ownership of it!  Instead of me preparing a breakfast for them, they prepared a breakfast for themselves and their peers.  It was much better for everyone!” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Five girls from the eighth grade Spanish class enjoy their delicious South American meal. According to eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler, having students bring in food items this year proved itself to be a change for the better. “When the students brought in the food and paper products, the students seemed even more excited and involved in the breakfast,” she said “They really took ownership of it! Instead of me preparing a breakfast for them, they prepared a breakfast for themselves and their peers. It was much better for everyone!” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two tables of boys from the eighth grade Spanish class practice certain expressions and customs during the breakfast. This conversation counts for a quiz grade. The vocabulary comes from chapter 8 of ¡Ven Comigo!, which centers on food. Students also learn how to order food at a restaurant in Spanish-speaking countries. According to eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler, one interesting custom is that patrons call over a waiter or waitress by making the sound “¡Pffft!” or “Tch, Tch” while snapping their fingers. “This might sound rude for us,” she said, “but it is a very appropriate custom in Spanish-speaking countries.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two tables of boys from the eighth grade Spanish class practice certain expressions and customs during the breakfast. This conversation counts for a quiz grade. The vocabulary comes from chapter 8 of ¡Ven Comigo!, which centers on food. Students also learn how to order food at a restaurant in Spanish-speaking countries. According to eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler, one interesting custom is that patrons call over a waiter or waitress by making the sound “¡Pffft!” or “Tch, Tch” while snapping their fingers. “This might sound rude for us,” she said, “but it is a very appropriate custom in Spanish-speaking countries.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The whole eighth grade Spanish class enjoys the Ecuadorian breakfast they prepared together, having their graded conversations as they eat. When asked why she hosts the breakfast, eighth-grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler said, “The more senses students use as they practice a foreign language, the more they will remember the experience and the language itself. This is always a very happy experience for students, and the positive emotions help them to retain in their long term memory the language and cultural elements they learn about.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The whole eighth grade Spanish class enjoys the Ecuadorian breakfast they prepared together, having their graded conversations as they eat. When asked why she hosts the breakfast, eighth-grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler said, “The more senses students use as they practice a foreign language, the more they will remember the experience and the language itself. This is always a very happy experience for students, and the positive emotions help them to retain in their long term memory the language and cultural elements they learn about.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

After they are done with their conversations, the eighth grade Spanish class enjoys a PowerPoint of Ecuadorian landscapes and sites accompanied by Ecuadorian music while they finish their breakfast. Eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler’s favorite thing about the breakfast is that the students get a small taste of another culture, enjoying a meal that is slightly different than the typical breakfast in the United States. “In this more relaxed atmosphere, the students speak in Spanish and experience a little bit of the Ecuadorian culture,” she said. “I like this activity because the students are very involved and retain a positive impression of Spanish class and learning another language.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After they are done with their conversations, the eighth grade Spanish class enjoys a PowerPoint of Ecuadorian landscapes and sites accompanied by Ecuadorian music while they finish their breakfast. Eighth grade foreign language teacher Doris-Ann Vosseler’s favorite thing about the breakfast is that the students get a small taste of another culture, enjoying a meal that is slightly different than the typical breakfast in the United States. “In this more relaxed atmosphere, the students speak in Spanish and experience a little bit of the Ecuadorian culture,” she said. “I like this activity because the students are very involved and retain a positive impression of Spanish class and learning another language.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Lila Etter Speaks About Barcelona

As a part of International Week, senior Lila Etter gave a presentation about her study abroad trip to Barcelona, Spain on Friday, March 13th. Etter traveled this summer after hosting a Spanish student the year prior.

Foreign Language Department Chair Michelle Magaña introduces Senior Lila Etter before she begins her presentation. Magaña is in charge of organizing International Week presentations each year, which are presented by students and community members alike. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Foreign Language Department Chair Michelle Magaña introduces Senior Lila Etter before she begins her presentation. Magaña is in charge of organizing International Week presentations each year, which are presented by students and community members alike. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Etter begins her presentation with a picture of the Spanish family with whom she stayed in Barcelona. Etter was part of a foreign exchange program run through the Pingree School, which allowed her to travel to Spain and to host a Spanish student visiting the United States. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Etter begins her presentation with a picture of the Spanish family with whom she stayed in Barcelona. Etter was part of a foreign exchange program run through the Pingree School, which allowed her to travel to Spain and to host a Spanish student visiting the United States. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Hayley Malloy waits to ask Etter a question regarding her travels. Etter showed a variety of pictures outlining her trip and spoke in depth about cultural and political life in Barcelona, particularly the desire of the Spanish region of Cataluña to separate from Spain. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Hayley Malloy waits to ask Etter a question regarding her travels. Etter showed a variety of pictures outlining her trip and spoke in depth about cultural and political life in Barcelona, particularly the desire of the Spanish region of Cataluña to separate from Spain. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade students listen to Etter’s presentation as she goes in depth about the various styles of architecture prominent in Barcelona. Students took notes as Etter outlined her trip and the different aspects of culture she encountered as a tourist in Barcelona. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade students listen to Etter’s presentation as she goes in depth about the various styles of architecture prominent in Barcelona. Students took notes as Etter outlined her trip and the different aspects of culture she encountered as a tourist in Barcelona. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Etter displays a picture of a Barcelonan house, known as Casa Batllo, which was designed by renowned architect Antoní Gaudí. Gaudí is famous for his design of La Sagrada Familia, a well-known and intricate cathedral in Barcelona, as well as his unique sense of design. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Etter displays a picture of a Barcelonan house, known as Casa Batllo, which was designed by renowned architect Antoní Gaudí. Gaudí is famous for his design of La Sagrada Familia, a well-known and intricate cathedral in Barcelona, as well as his unique sense of design. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grade math class prepares for test with “Joker’s Wild” game

Keith Stefanek’s seventh grade math class prepares for all of its quizzes and tests with a group-based review game created by Stefanek called the “Joker’s Wild.” This competition is one of the essential rites of passage for children at MERMS.

The three pouches from which cards are drawn, as wells as the scoreboard for the Joker’s Wild, hang on seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek’s classroom. A single is worth 50 points, a pair is worth 100 points, and a triple is worth 200 points. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The three pouches from which cards are drawn, as well as the scoreboard for the Joker’s Wild, hang on seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek’s classroom. A single is worth 50 points, a pair is worth 100 points, and a triple is worth 200 points. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A student from the seventh grade math class draws a card from each pouch. The team that the student represents chooses the topic of the next problem from the three cards. If three Jokers are drawn, the team that gets the next question correct wins automatically. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A student from the seventh grade math class draws a card from each pouch. The team that the student represents chooses the topic of the next problem from the three cards. If three Jokers are drawn, the team that gets the next question correct wins automatically. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The seventh grade math class, broken up into teams, works diligently to be the first to complete the assigned math problem first. The winning team in a game of the Joker’s Wild is awarded with extra credit points on the test and a homework pass for each of its members. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The seventh grade math class, broken up into teams, works diligently to be the first to complete the assigned math problem. The winning team in a game of the Joker’s Wild is awarded with extra credit points on the test and a homework pass for each of its members. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek helps a student and her team out with a math problem. The class was studying for a test on volume, surface area, angles, and lines. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek helps a student and her team out with a math problem. The class was studying for a test on volume, surface area, angles, and lines. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A team of students comes up to the white board to work on a problem together. Once they have agreed on an answer, seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek comes over to check if they are correct. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A team of students comes up to the white board to work on a problem together. Once they have agreed on an answer, seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek comes over to check if they are correct. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class watches as seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek writes down a problem on the board for the class to solve. Stefanek came up with the idea for the game from a television game show of the same name that ran during his youth. “It asked general knowledge trivia,” he said, “and I adapted it to fit my math classes.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class watches as seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek writes down a problem on the board for the class to solve. Stefanek came up with the idea for the game from a television game show of the same name that ran during his youth. “It asked general knowledge trivia,” he said, “and I adapted it to fit my math classes.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A team of seventh-graders races to be the first to solve the chosen math problem. When asked why he uses the game in his class, seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek answered, “I play it with the students because it is a great way to review what we have learned. Students get to work cooperatively, and they enjoy playing the game as well.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A team of seventh-graders races to be the first to solve the chosen math problem. When asked why he uses the game in his class, seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek answered, “I play it with the students because it is a great way to review what we have learned. Students get to work cooperatively, and they enjoy playing the game as well.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek updates the score of the Joker’s Wild. Stefanek has been playing the game with his classes for close to ten years. “My favorite thing is watching students help each other learn and review the math concepts, while trying to win at the same time!” he said. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade math teacher Keith Stefanek updates the score of the Joker’s Wild. Stefanek has been playing the game with his classes for close to ten years. “My favorite thing is watching students help each other learn and review the math concepts, while trying to win at the same time!” he said. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Global Issues Raises Money with a Penny War

The Global Issues class, taught by history teacher James Wallimann, chose to fight malaria this year and host a Penny War fundraiser to raise money for their cause. In Penny Wars, each coin is worth a certain amount of points, depending on the type of coin, and each dollar subtracts 100 points from that grade’s jug. At the end of the month, the class with the largest amount of points wins an ice cream social.

 

 

Seniors Teddy Economo and Craig Carter work the Penny Wars stand and oversee the placement of coins. Students from the Global Issues class run numerous fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for their cause. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Teddy Economo and Craig Carter work the Penny Wars stand and oversee the placement of coins. Students from the Global Issues class run numerous fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for their cause. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Grades 6 through 12, as well as the faculty, have marked jugs in which to place their coins. This year, the students are raising money for Malaria No More, a non-profit foundation dedicated to diminishing and eventually eliminating deaths due to Malaria. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Grades 6 through 12, as well as the faculty, have marked jugs in which to place their coins. This year, the students are raising money for Malaria No More, a non-profit foundation dedicated to diminishing and eventually eliminating deaths due to Malaria. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students can place coins in their jugs to gain points for their class; however they may also place bills into other class’s jugs to subtract a certain amount of points. The money will help prevent deaths due to Malaria, which is one of the top three killers of children worldwide. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students can place coins in their jugs to gain points for their class; however they may also place bills into other class’s jugs to subtract a certain amount of points. The money will help prevent deaths due to Malaria, which is one of the top three killers of children worldwide. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Samantha Woodman places a coin into her class bucket. This year, the seniors amassed the largest amount of coin across the entire school and won an ice cream social for their entire class. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Senior Samantha Woodman places a coin into her class bucket. This year, the seniors amassed the largest amount of coin across the entire school and won an ice cream social for their entire class. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Every 60 seconds, a child dies from Malaria, a completely preventable and curable disease. From Penny Wars alone, students raised slightly over 800 dollars for the cause. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Every 60 seconds, a child dies from Malaria, a completely preventable and curable disease. From Penny Wars alone, students raised slightly over 800 dollars for the cause. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

 

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ME Alumni talk about study abroad experiences

Wednesday, March 11th former students of Manchester Essex presented during international week. The class of 2011s Kristine Walder and Rebecca Lynch spoke to students about their time abroad in several different countries. Lynch traveled to many countries in Europe and Walder traveled in South
America and the Galapagos.

Former student of MERSD class of 2011 Rebecca Lynch spoke about her time in Italy. The architecture in Florence is very authentic because it has some of the oldest and largest buildings. Florence, Italy has the largest brick dome in the world. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Former student of MERSD class of 2011 Rebecca Lynch spoke about her time in Italy. The architecture in Florence is very authentic because it has some of the oldest and largest buildings. Florence, Italy has the largest brick dome in the world. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Lynch explained the food, and how it differs from Italian food that is made in America. She spoke about the many different types of pastas and food she ate on her trip. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Lynch explained the food, and how it differs from Italian food that is made in America. She spoke about the many different types of pastas and food she ate on her trip. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students and teachers listen intently to the stories shared. Students are required to take notes during every presentation for a quiz grade. Students are also told to try the food in the cafeteria and wear the colors of the country for the day. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students and teachers listen intently to the stories shared. Students are required to take notes during every presentation for a quiz grade. Students are also told to try the food in the cafeteria and wear the colors of the country for the day. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dachau Concentration Camp is in Munich, Germany, Lynch explained the feeling of shock walking through the concentration camp. She spoke to the students that it was a scary and moving seeing the tragic things people had gone through. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dachau Concentration Camp is in Munich, Germany, Lynch explained the feeling of shock walking through the concentration camp. She spoke to the students that it was a scary and moving seeing the tragic things people had gone through. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Lynch also traveled to Interlaken, Switzerland. She spoke about the food and the landscape. Her favorite part was the chocolate and the sweets made in Switzerland. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Lynch also traveled to Interlaken, Switzerland. She spoke about the food and the landscape. Her favorite part was the chocolate and the sweets made in Switzerland. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school students write down their facts and sentences about Walder’s time in the Galapagos. Students asked questions periodically throughout both presentations. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school students write down their facts and sentences about Walder’s time in the Galapagos. Students asked questions periodically throughout both presentations. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Former student Christine Walder shared her travels and experiences in different places. She shared her time in the Galapagos and briefly spoke in Spanish about her time. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Former student Christine Walder shared her travels and experiences in different places. She shared her time in the Galapagos and briefly spoke in Spanish about her time. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Walder shared her time in the Amazon jungle. She spoke about the differences in plants and animals. Walder took a picture with the “mother of poisonous spiders” at night. Iguanas are rare to see because they have the ability to bled in with things for protection. Spikes grow on trees so nothing can kill it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Walder shared her time in the Amazon jungle. She spoke about the differences in plants and animals. Walder took a picture with the “mother of poisonous spiders” at night. Iguanas are rare to see because they have the ability to bled in with things for protection. Spikes grow on trees so nothing can kill it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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6th Graders Give Book Talks

On Friday February 27th, Rebecca Figueroa’s sixth grade English class gave book talks. Each student gave a review of the book they had been reading nightly. Presenting in front of the class helps the students get some practice with public speaking and literary analysis.

Sixth grader Will Rodier presents his book The London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd. This book is a young adult mystery novel recommended for ages 8-12. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Will Rodier presents his book The London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd. This book is a young adult mystery novel recommended for ages 8-12. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hattie Wilson raises her hand to ask her classmate a question about their presentation during the dedicated question time. Students are encouraged to ask relevant questions and make comments they have about other students’ book talks. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hattie Wilson raises her hand to ask her classmate a question about their presentation during the dedicated question time. Students are encouraged to ask relevant questions and make comments they have about other students’ book talks. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Rebecca Figueroa explains to her sixth grade students what it looks and sounds like to be a good audience. Sixth graders are taught these manners and skills within different assignments. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Rebecca Figueroa explains to her sixth grade students what it looks and sounds like to be a good audience. Sixth graders are taught these manners and skills within different assignments. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth graders are assigned to read at least thirty minutes each night of a book of their choosing. Once they have finished the book, they present the book with a short summary, their rating out of ten, and who they would recommend it to.  Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth graders are assigned to read at least thirty minutes each night of a book of their choosing. Once they have finished the book, they present the book with a short summary, their rating out of ten, and who they would recommend it to. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sixth grader Sean Phelan discusses Maze Runner by James Dashner. Students were encouraged to provide a visual display of something that relates to their book. Though most students chose to show the cover of the book, others, like Phelan, chose to provide a symbol that had to do with the story. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Sean Phelan discusses Maze Runner by James Dashner. Students were encouraged to provide a visual display of something that relates to their book. Though most students chose to show the cover of the book, others, like Phelan, chose to provide a symbol that had to do with the story. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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8th Graders Construct Residential Structures

On Thursday February 5th, John Bannister-Marx’s eighth grade engineering class worked on constructing miniature residential homes. The students designed a bird’s eye view of the interior of the one floor home any way they liked, but they had to scale sizes down to being able to fit on a one 1×1’ piece of cardboard.

 

Patiently waiting for her glue to dry, eighth grader Kaya Crandall holds her cardboard in place to form one of the four outer walls to her house. Crandall precisely measured how big each room in her building should be. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Patiently waiting for her glue to dry, eighth grader Kaya Crandall holds her cardboard in place to form one of the four outer walls to her house. Crandall precisely measured how big each room in her building should be. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Recently the middle school has invested in a three dimensional visual printer. Teacher John Bannister-Marx explains how the printer works, and what comes out of it. Students are encouraged to use the printer, supervised by the teachers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Recently the middle school has invested in a three dimensional visual printer. Teacher John Bannister-Marx explains how the printer works, and what comes out of it. Students are encouraged to use the printer, supervised by the teachers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The 3D printing process begins by making a virtual design of the object one wants to make. The scanner on the printer makes a digital copy of a computer aided design and then puts it into a 3D modeling program. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The 3D printing process begins by making a virtual design of the object one wants to make. The scanner on the printer makes a digital copy of a computer aided design and then puts it into a 3D modeling program. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The material used for the 3D products is a hard plastic made from starch. The Maker-Bot Replicator 2, also known as the 3D printer is a safe, student accessible machine. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The material used for the 3D products is a hard plastic made from starch. The Maker-Bot Replicator 2, also known as the 3D printer is a safe, student accessible machine. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students work delicately and precisely. Students ask questions when needed. Bannister-Marx walks around the room routinely checking on students and how far along their work are coming. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students work delicately and precisely. Students ask questions when needed. Bannister-Marx walks around the room routinely checking on students and how far along their work are coming. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Questions are commonly asked on how to use certain tools, or for measurement checks.  Tucker Spencer and Haley Wolf are shown how to mark correct room dimensions by Bannister-Marx. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Questions are commonly asked on how to use certain tools, or for measurement checks. Tucker Spencer and Haley Wolf are shown how to mark correct room dimensions by Bannister-Marx. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Every student enrolled in engineering had this project. Students were allowed to make their house more of a ‘home’. Creativity was key to this project; they furnished and painted their houses however they wanted. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Every student enrolled in engineering had this project. Students were allowed to make their house more of a ‘home’. Creativity was key to this project; they furnished and painted their houses however they wanted. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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New Physical Education Teacher Instructs a Seventh Grade Class

On Wednesday, January 14, the new middle school physical education teacher, Kathleen Pizzello, guided seventh grade students in playing volleyball. Pizzello first began teaching at MERSD on December 8.

As the students came into the gym, physical education teacher Pizzella instructed them to start the warm-ups for the class. She watched as they moved across the room and made sure that they were doing the warm-up correctly. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As the students came into the gym, physical education teacher Pizzello instructed them to start the warm-ups for the class. She watched as they moved across the room and made sure that they were doing the warm-up correctly. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After warm-ups Pizzella had the students make a circle in the middle of the room and explained the rules and safety precautions for volleyball. Pizzella came from the MASCO school where she taught history. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After warm-ups Pizzello had the students make a circle in the middle of the room and explained the rules and safety precautions for volleyball. Pizzello came from the MASCO school where she taught history. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The seventh graders split up into groups to practice hitting the volleyball. Pizzella played pop music during the class, which she controlled from her iPad. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The seventh graders split up into groups to practice hitting the volleyball. Pizzello played pop music during the class, which she controlled from her iPad. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzella asked the students to reiterate the safety rules of volleyball to her and then chose groups to begin a few games for the rest of the class.  Pizzella is also a yoga teacher at the MAC. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello asked the students to reiterate the safety rules of volleyball to her and then chose groups to begin a few games for the rest of the class. Pizzello is also a yoga teacher at the MAC. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

During the game Pizzella helped seventh grader Jackson Strout with serving the ball. Pizzella helped many of the students in order to improve how they played the game and gave many words of encouragement to the students. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During the game Pizzello helped seventh grader Jackson Strout with serving the ball. Pizzello helped many of the students in order to improve how they played the game and gave many words of encouragement to the students. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Gallery: Assembly celebrates the season

The Manchester Essex middle and high schools came together to celebrate the holiday season in an assembly on the last day of school before break.

 

Juniors Sara Rhuda and Chelsea Rose sang several songs. Next, Essex Police Chief Peter Silva and his band of fellow law enforcement officers, Uncharted Watahs, played several songs. For a few of them, eighth grader Kendall Hershey accompanied on drums. The SoundWaves also sang with band.

 

This season the students of both schools brought in over $2800 in toys to donate to Pathways for Children. Additionally, the Rotary Club donated over $1000 in gift cards to students and their families that are in financial need.

 

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