Manchester Essex Regional High School Ranked 18 in State

Manchester Essex High School was recently ranked number 18 in the state of Massachusetts by US News and World Reports. The school ranked 118 in the nation for STEM and 394 in the country overall. The district was ranked 15 in Boston Magazine’s Best Schools in Boston 2013. The teacher student ratio is 14:1 and 91.5% of Advanced Placement students scored a 3-5 on their AP tests.  MERHS is known for its athletic teams, art programs, and teaching and learning strategies. The following photos show some of the great learning and doing at the school.

The High school engineering class created a self-made light bulb only using ingredients found in the classroom. The class is learning about electrical charges and how batteries send currents through the wires, to the graphite and that sparks a flame, which creates the light. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The High school engineering class created a self-made light bulb only using ingredients found in the classroom. The class is learning about electrical charges and how batteries send currents through the wires, to the graphite and that sparks a flame, which creates the light. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Tyler Malik after several tries finally got his light to illuminate. The bulb would only burn for thirty seconds or less. One group of students got their bulb to burn for a minute and forty five seconds because of the numerous rods of graphite. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Tyler Malik after several tries finally got his light to illuminate. The bulb would only burn for thirty seconds or less. One group of students got their bulb to burn for a minute and forty five seconds because of the numerous rods of graphite. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school English class goes over prepositional phrases, and adjective phrases. Elizabeth Edgerton teaches that all parts of a sentence go together and always have a subject and a predicate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school English class goes over prepositional phrases, and adjective phrases. Elizabeth Edgerton teaches that all parts of a sentence go together and always have a subject and a predicate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen David LaForge volunteers to explain and underline the prepositional phrases in a paragraph projected on the board. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen David LaForge volunteers to explain and underline the prepositional phrases in a paragraph projected on the board. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Physics teacher Phil Logsdon offers students to go to the board and explain the parts of the eye to the class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Physics teacher Phil Logsdon offers students to go to the board and explain the parts of the eye to the class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students explain the inside of the eye and how eyes are some most important parts of the body. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students explain the inside of the eye and how eyes are some most important parts of the body. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school students at the near end of the year are given a research paper. Students peer edit each other’s work to make sure there are no grammatical errors or layout problems. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school students at the near end of the year are given a research paper. Students peer edit each other’s work to make sure there are no grammatical errors or layout problems. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The library is a place for students to quietly and efficiently get work done with no distractions during a study hall. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The library is a place for students to quietly and efficiently get work done with no distractions during a study hall. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior T.C. Fougere pays close attention to his history class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior T.C. Fougere pays close attention to his history class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in Abigail Donnelly’s junior’s history class read a letter projected on the board that explains a key detail in the unit they are studying. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in Abigail Donnelly’s junior’s history class read a letter projected on the board that explains a key detail in the unit they are studying. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The high school has an open door policy in the front office. The principal Patricia Puglisi converses with freshmen student Phoebe Savje about upcoming events in the district. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The high school has an open door policy in the front office. The principal Patricia Puglisi converses with freshmen student Phoebe Savje about upcoming events in the district. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The world language department has many great tactics to help students study for tests and quizzes efficiently and effectively. Students in Erin Fortunato’s Spanish class, students are put into groups of two and three and have to re write English sentences on the board in Spanish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The world language department has many great tactics to help students study for tests and quizzes efficiently and effectively. Students in Erin Fortunato’s Spanish class, students are put into groups of two and three and have to re write English sentences on the board in Spanish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Working hard together, freshmen Lilly Calandra, Cole Charlton, and Evan Pennoyer talk and work together on how to correctly re-write the sentence. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Working hard together, freshmen Lilly Calandra, Cole Charlton, and Evan Pennoyer talk and work together on how to correctly re-write the sentence. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The math department focuses on many things throughout the school year. Students in Sarah Deluca’s freshmen math class listen to the instructions of their next activity, before they are handed a worksheet and sent on their own to do it.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The math department focuses on many things throughout the school year. Students in Sarah Deluca’s freshmen math class listen to the instructions of their next activity, before they are handed a worksheet and sent on their own to do it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Ford works intently on a math worksheet that has students figure out the x and why axis coordinates on a graph. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Ford works intently on a math worksheet that has students figure out the x and why axis coordinates on a graph. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Learning strategies class helps students in all grades in the high school on skills they need to focus on. It helps students on an IEP and 504 contracts. It gives students a time for extra help on quizzes and tests, and extra help on homework. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Learning strategies class helps students in all grades in the high school on skills they need to focus on. It helps students on an IEP and 504 contracts. It gives students a time for extra help on quizzes and tests, and extra help on homework. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Teacher’s hands on work with students to get though work that person is struggling with. The Learning strategies class focuses on all subjects. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Teacher’s hands on work with students to get though work that person is struggling with. The Learning strategies class focuses on all subjects. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Manchester Essex Multimedia Online is a class to keep the Manchester Essex Middle High school up to date with the latest news and things happening with in the school. Students shoot stories of things happening with in the school district, events happening on weekends or even at night, MEMO students are there to shoot it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Manchester Essex Multimedia Online is a class to keep the Manchester Essex Middle High school up to date with the latest news and things happening with in the school. Students shoot stories of things happening with in the school district, events happening on weekends or even at night, MEMO students are there to shoot it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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7th graders visit the annual book fair

Every year the school has an annual book fair, by The Book Shop. The Book Shop is located on 40 West Street in Beverly Farms (across from the Beverly Farms MBTA train station). Their hours are Monday-Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Books in the book fair are provided by The Book Shop. The prices of books range from $5.99-28.99 depending on the book(s) you chose to purchase.

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Where did Mrs. Hunt go?

Most students are familiar with Cathy Hunt as a kind-hearted library assistant you can always relate to. Since she has been relocated, people have no idea where she is.

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MERMHS library grows digital

 

MERSD Library Teacher Mrs. Sue Krause recently invited two executives from Gale Cengage Learning, a world leader in e-research and educational publishing, to train the Middle and High School faculty in our new eBook reference collection.  Mrs. Krause recently purchased the Gale High School eBook Core Collection to enhance our library’s already existing eBook collection.  This collection puts in place a robust, foundational collection of digital reference and non-fiction to support areas across the curriculum and support the Common Core Standards.  Specific benefits for our students and faculty include:

·     The Gale Virtual Reference Library  (GVRL)- a collection of encyclopedias and specialized reference sources for multidisciplinary research.

·     The eBooks are available 24/7 with no checkout required on the MERHS Library website on-line database page http://www.merhs.mersd.org/Pages/MERHS_Library/OD   (Password = hornets).

·     Users are able to search the MERHS library GVRL holding from any Internet-connected device.

·     The eBook Core Collection along with titles selected by Mrs. Krause are digitally reproduced from trusted, authoritative works from Gale and other publishing partners.

“This is a wonderful addition to our library collection and it meets our students where they live – online,”  Mrs. Krause explained.  “I think the faculty members who received training on the new eBook collection were able to see quickly how the collection will enhance their curriculum and research projects.  Feedback was very positive!”

Mrs. Krause first introduced eBooks to the MERHS Library collection several years ago and has been growing the collection as available resources have become available that meet MERSD curriculum standards.

 

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Library Hosts Book Fair

From the 3rd until the 7th of December, a book fair was set up in the library during school. Sponsored by The Book Shop in Beverly Farms, it featured a wide array of popular books for both the Middle and the High School.

 

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School establishes library policy

 By Maggie Lehar

  Because controlling noise levels in the library was a problem last year, new rules of conduct have been instated to encourage students to use the library appropriately.

  Last year the library was very loud and out of control, according to library teacher Sue Krause.

  “Students didn’t treat it like a library. In a public library, you know you have to be quiet. But in the school library last year it was a free for all,” library assistant Catherine Hunt said.

  “One of the major complaints we received was from the teachers who signed out the computers to teach a class in the library. They had to compete with loud students from study hall or who had just wandered in,” Krause said.

  “The big thing that I found was that kids would bring their own computers in, find something funny on YouTube and laugh and laugh and laugh, and you know that’s not really what a school library is for,” she said.

  “It’s too bad that there isn’t a place that kids can hang out, but the school’s not equipped with that, and that’s not the purpose of the library to be the loud hang out place,” Krause said.

  Students are still encouraged to come in and get books, do research, and study, Hunt said.

  “We want kids to come in; we just want them to realize that it is not a lounge. It’s not fair to the kids who want to study and have a quiet area to have to compete with all the noises,” she said.

  “The thing I really want to stress is that kids need a purpose to come and use the library, not just to talk,” Krause said.

  So far the new rules have been successful at reducing distractions in the library, according to senior Jacob Martz.

   “I think it’s good that the school is making an effort to keep things in the library under control. In the last few years the library has gotten loud and out of hand. I spend a lot of time in the library for debate and ASR and I find it much easier to concentrate and get work done now that it is much quieter,” Martz said.

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Summer reading books on display in library

For the next week, summer reading books are on display in the library for students to view. On May 14, students are required to tell their history teachers their top three choices for this summer. Books are chosen by teachers in every department and range in a variety of genres.

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Library passes create a nuisance

By Morgan Kennedy

In an attempt to control and keep track of students, a new library pass system was enacted over the past few weeks; however, this new method simply burdens study hall monitors and students alike. 

Five students from each study hall are allowed to go to the library. The new system requires each of these five students to have their own pass, signed by the study hall monitor. In some cases, three study hall classes are assigned to one teacher in a given block, forcing the monitor to write out 15 individual library passes.

Because of the unnecessary time taken to write out a pass for every student, the line to a study hall monitor’s desk is often out the door of the classroom. Students are stuck waiting in line for 10 minutes for a pass, while monitors waste just as much time writing them out.

Once students arrive at the library, they place their passes in a designated basket. This method might control the amount of students who get to the library, but it does nothing to stop them from leaving and wandering the halls. Just because a student places a slip of paper in the basket does not necessarily mean he or she is accounted for.

Requiring each student to have his or her own pass is contradictory to our “green” school values because at least 15 slips of paper are wasted every study hall.

The new system is also a nuisance for seniors who come to school late when their study hall falls during first block. Each senior checks in and gets a pass at the main office when they arrive at school, but if they wish to spend the rest of their study hall in the library, they must find their monitor and get another pass first. There is no difference between placing an office pass and a study hall pass in the basket, so both should be accepted in the library.

Under the old system, study hall monitors recorded who left the classroom and where they went, so aside from a massive increase in wasted time, not much has changed.

Allowing five students per pass would clear up classrooms quicker while still ensuring that everyone in the library is accounted for. Laminating and reusing library passes every block would improve the system as well, decreasing paper waste.

Krause said the new system is going well but recognizes that it creates more work for the study hall monitors.

“Ms. Hunt and I will meet and discuss how things are going at the end of the year,” she said. “We’re here to please, but we still need accountability.”

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Library introduces Ebooks

The library now has access to Ebooks. There are about forty books available and students may read them in their entirety. Online Ebooks may be accessed through the library’s page on the school’s website.

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Chillax Club builds gingerbread houses

The Chillax club, run by Cathy Hunt, had a holiday party on Tuesday December 20th. They ordered pizza and had a variety of drinks available to the members. The students in the club decorated gingerbread houses together and then they were given to two members. Previously, the Chillax Club sold Down River ice cream to raise money so they could purchase the food for the holiday party. Everyone is welcome to attend the Chillax Club meetings held once a month.

 

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