Physical Education Classes Enjoy the Warm Weather

Thursday April 30th students in Eric Magers high school gym class and students in Kathleen Pizzello middle school gym class play outside. The middle school class played Frisbee and prepared for their ultimate Frisbee unit. The high school class played two hand touch, while students inside played four square. 20150430_Jenny Ainsley high school Gym Class_0710

After the turnover from Williams, Nowak throws the ball down the field to teammates. The pass was received by sophomore Mac McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the turnover from Williams, Nowak throws the ball down the field to teammates. The pass was received by sophomore Mac McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade students in Kathleen Pizzello’s gym class practice passing the Frisbee before beginning their unit on ultimate Frisbee. Eighth grader Suzy Morton passes to her partner. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade students in Kathleen Pizzello’s gym class practice passing the Frisbee before beginning their unit on ultimate Frisbee. Eighth grader Suzy Morton passes to her partner. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students had to be aware of their surroundings while throwing Frisbees because of the hazard of hitting other students. Eighth grader Anna Bonaccorso begins her throw in the correct form. Students are advised every day to change for class, otherwise they cannot participate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students had to be aware of their surroundings while throwing Frisbees because of the hazard of hitting other students. Eighth grader Anna Bonaccorso begins her throw in the correct form. Students are advised every day to change for class, otherwise they cannot participate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle schooler Jake Athanas catches the Frisbee and with a quick release returns the disc to his parter. Athanas said Frisbee is one  of his favorite units. It was a perfect spring day to be outside for class. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle schooler Jake Athanas catches the Frisbee and with a quick release returns the disc to his parter. Athanas said Frisbee is one of his favorite units. It was a perfect spring day to be outside for class. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello begins to explain the rules of ultimate Frisbee to her students. Students look toward the boundaries and begin to look for their teams. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello begins to explain the rules of ultimate Frisbee to her students. Students look toward the boundaries and begin to look for their teams. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Milne runs back to his position after his team scored a touchdown. The sophomores then decide to create a game plan on how to win their game. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Milne runs back to his position after his team scored a touchdown. The sophomores then decide to create a game plan on how to win their game. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Aisea Richardson and Evan Williams run a play. Williams hands off to Richardson and he then runs the field to get the touchdown. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Aisea Richardson and Evan Williams run a play. Williams hands off to Richardson and he then runs the field to get the touchdown. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams passes the ball to the end of the field in a Hail Mary in hopes he will get a touchdown pass. The ball is picked off by Milne and then is two hand touched by McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams passes the ball to the end of the field in a Hail Mary in hopes he will get a touchdown pass. The ball is picked off by Milne and then is two hand touched by McCoy. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams runs the ball between McCoy and Richardson. He does not make it through and got a turn over to the other team. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Williams runs the ball between McCoy and Richardson. He does not make it through and got a turn over to the other team. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Richardson with an illegal move is put on a two minute penalty. Students with penalties had to stand with Magers and cheering on  their teammates. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Richardson with an illegal move is put on a two minute penalty. Students with penalties had to stand with Magers and cheering on their teammates. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Pizzello explains the boundaries and rules of the game of ultimate Frisbee. Students sat in a circle listening to how to play. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Pizzello explains the boundaries and rules of the game of ultimate Frisbee. Students sat in a circle listening to how to play. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Health Class Creates Nutrition Projects

On Friday, March 20th, 2015, Health teacher Eric Magers’ freshmen and sophomore class continued their work on their food and nutrition projects. Students worked either alone or in pairs in order to create a slide show that they would present to the class.

Magers encouraged the students to discuss the negative and positive aspects of their topic. A slide explains the negative effects of eating poorly. These effects include delayed growth, long term weight gain, loss of energy, and can even lead to eventual death. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Magers encouraged the students to discuss the negative and positive aspects of their topic. A slide explains the negative effects of eating poorly. These effects include delayed growth, long term weight gain, loss of energy, and can even lead to eventual death. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Sally Pulver goes through her finished Power Point slide show before presenting it to the class the next day. The overarching topic was food, but each student chose a different health related aspect to focus on. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Sally Pulver goes through her finished Power Point slide show before presenting it to the class the next day. The overarching topic was food, but each student chose a different health related aspect to focus on. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Kassandra Xhalia and Taylor Reader do some extra research to gain more information on their topic. Students were allowed to use the internet or other sources to research their topic. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Kassandra Xhalia and Taylor Reader do some extra research to gain more information on their topic. Students were allowed to use the internet or other sources to research their topic. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Freshmen Mitch Paccone, Andrew Milne, and Jackson Rice work on their individual projects. Students were given the option to work alone or in pairs.  Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Mitch Paccone, Andrew Milne, and Jackson Rice work on their individual projects. Students were given the option to work alone or in pairs. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Tackling A healthy Lifestyle for 2015

By Courtney Fraser

Trends in health and fitness have been circulating through social media as people search for ways to tackle their New Year resolutions of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Whether it’s starting a new workout program, eating a healthier diet, or closing down the computer screen to get outside, everyone is beginning 2015 with a new, fresh start.

Rising in popularity, the MELT body workout foam roller has been capturing the attention of many who suffer from digestive problems, weight gain, stress, and aching joints.

“MELT now has 1,300 instructors nationwide and a following that includes the Olympic snowboarder Jamie Anderson, who used the method on her feet before winning gold in Sochi, Russia,” Julia Lawlor of the New York Times said.

Another popular workout that surfaced with the new year is the POUND Workout that combines cardio interval training with drumming to provide a challenging workout.

“The workout fuses cardio, Pilates, isometric movements, plyometrics and isometric poses into a 45-minute series. Burn between 400 and 900+ calories per hour and strengthen and sculpt infrequently used muscles,” the Poundfit website explained.

Physical workouts are always a nice way to relieve stress and stay healthy; however, 2015 has introduced new devices that can help maintain a healthy diet.

The Nutribullet System is one of the most popular, top-of-the-line juicers introduced early this year; the device can be purchased online on the Nutribullet website for $19.99.

The Nutribullet helps release vital nutrients found in fruits and vegetables to create a nutritious and healthful smoothie.

“This is possible by the cyclonic action of the system made possible by its powerful motor (600+ watts) and cyclonic blades. It does a pretty good job turning your fruits and vegetables into delicious smoothies,” the Juicing Diet Works website explained.

This device is not only easy to use but simple to clean up. Additionally, the Nutribullet juices the skin of fruits and vegetables, so all of the vitamins are included in the smoothie.

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Red Cross hosts blood drive

On March 11th, the student council hosted the Red Cross blood drive. The drive was held in the gymnasium and had many students donate blood. 24 units of blood were collected in total.

Juniors Jack Haynie and Nathan Evans wait patiently for their turn to donate blood. Students must be 16 years or older to donate to the Red Cross. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Jack Haynie and Nathan Evans wait patiently for their turn to donate blood. Students must be 16 years or older to donate to the Red Cross. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After donating blood, students sat down in the hang out area. They were given drinks and snacks to keep their blood sugar up. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After donating blood, students sat down in the hang out area. They were given drinks and snacks to keep their blood sugar up. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Robert Carter was one of the first underclassmen of the day to donate blood.  Every two seconds someone in the US needs blood. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Robert Carter was one of the first underclassmen of the day to donate blood. Every two seconds someone in the US needs blood. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Members of the student council volunteered throughout the day. Some worked the front desk, while others made sure everyone was properly rested before returning back to class. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Members of the student council volunteered throughout the day. Some worked the front desk, while others made sure everyone was properly rested before returning back to class. Courtney MacDougall for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Health students present information about dangers and effects of drugs

Eric Magers’ health class presents their powerpoints about their assigned drugs.  Students worked in partners or groups of three to answer assigned questions about two or more drugs in their presentations.

Sophomores Julia Przesiek and Emily Dahlen and freshman Jane Grady present about Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta.  Adderall is used primarily to treat ADHD, and it should not be used without a prescription.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Julia Przesiek and Emily Dahlen and freshman Jane Grady present about Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta. Adderall is used primarily to treat ADHD, and it should not be used without a prescription. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Madeleine Conway and Amber Paré inform the class about inhalants, whippets, adrenalin, and morphine.  While adrenalin is naturally in the body and morphine is used to treat severe pain, inhalants/whippets are used for a quick high with no medical benefits.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Madeleine Conway and Amber Paré inform the class about inhalants, whippets, adrenalin, and morphine. While adrenalin is naturally in the body and morphine is used to treat severe pain, inhalants/whippets are used for a quick high with no medical benefits. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Joseph Cirone explains steroids and GHB to the class.  Both drugs are often illegal when used to improve athletic performance.  For medical uses, GHB can be used as an anesthetic and steroids have a wide range of uses.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Joseph Cirone explains steroids and GHB to the class. Both drugs are often illegal when used to improve athletic performance. For medical uses, GHB can be used as an anesthetic and steroids have a wide range of uses. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Avery Shaw and Freshman Christian Hadaegh educate their peers about cough medication and Xanax.  Xanax is used as an antidepressant, and cough medicine is not only used for coughing, but it is also abused and can be addictive.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Avery Shaw and Freshman Christian Hadaegh educate their peers about cough medication and Xanax. Xanax is used as an antidepressant, and cough medicine is not only used for coughing, but it is also abused and can be addictive. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Nathaniel Rautio and Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Louis Masella describe Psilocybin mushrooms and desomorphine, or Krokodil.  Krokodil is composed of codeine, alcohol, gasoline, red phosphorus, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and paint thinner; it is known as a flesh-eating drug due to its large amount of tissue damage/infection.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Nathaniel Rautio and Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Louis Masella describe Psilocybin mushrooms and desomorphine, or Krokodil. Krokodil is composed of codeine, alcohol, gasoline, red phosphorus, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and paint thinner; it is known as a flesh-eating drug due to its large amount of tissue damage/infection. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tomaz Tofuri and Anthony Brazzo tell the class about marijuana and synthetic marijuana.  Synthetic marijuana, or spice, is a mixture of dried plant material and dangerous chemical additives which cause psychoactive effects.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tomaz Tofuri and Anthony Brazzo tell the class about marijuana and synthetic marijuana. Synthetic marijuana, or spice, is a mixture of dried plant material and dangerous chemical additives which cause psychoactive effects. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robert Sarmanian and Jared Zaval introduce information about cocaine, crack, and PCP.  Crack is a type of cocaine that must be smoked because of its rough, rocky texture, and PCP is also known Angel Dust, which can cause psychotic side effects.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robert Sarmanian and Jared Zaval introduce information about cocaine, crack, and PCP. Crack is a type of cocaine that must be smoked because of its rough, rocky texture, and PCP is also known Angel Dust, which can cause psychotic side effects. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Samantha Booma and Randall Doane display their knowledge about crystal meth and bath salts.  Bath salts are not what their name suggests; they are actually synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines.  Because of the resulting hallucinations and violent behavior, bath salts are known in media as the zombie drug.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Samantha Booma and Randall Doane display their knowledge about crystal meth and bath salts. Bath salts are not what their name suggests; they are actually synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines. Because of the resulting hallucinations and violent behavior, bath salts are known in media as the zombie drug. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Abigail Roundy and Frederick Spofford show their research on LSD and alcohol.   LSD produces anxiety, paranoia, and delusions.   Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Ethan Ketchum and Matthew Kenney give their presentation to the class about research chemicals. Although these chemicals are sometimes sold outside of medicine’s legislation to people as psychoactive drugs, they are meant for laboratory use only and are not intended for human use. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Sophomores Ethan Ketchum and Matthew Kenney give their presentation to the class about research chemicals.  Although these chemicals are sometimes sold outside of medicine’s legislation to people as psychoactive drugs, they are meant for laboratory use only and are not intended for human use.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Abigail Roundy and Frederick Spofford show their research on LSD and alcohol. LSD produces anxiety, paranoia, and delusions. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Cafeteria Hosts Local Food Day

On Friday the 25th of October, school nutrition director Shelia Parisien and Green Team leader Eric Magers joined forces to bring healthy options to school lunches. Throughout the three lunches, students had many choices of new and locally grown food to eat for lunch.

One of the options for lunch was baked Gloucester caught sole along with locally grown butternut squash and a few items from the school garden. The school garden, located below the balcony, grows vegetables from peppers to tomatoes which are used in the everyday school lunches. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One of the options for lunch was baked Gloucester caught sole along with locally grown butternut squash and a few items from the school garden. The school garden, located below the balcony, grows vegetables from peppers to tomatoes which are used in the everyday school lunches. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The other choice for the healthy food day lunch was chowder, from fish, caught in Gloucester and a lettuce wrap with cranberry mayo. Both of the dishes included a fresh apple picked from Brooksby Farm in Peabody to add a fruit to the heavily concentrated vegetable meal. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The other choice for the healthy food day lunch was chowder, from fish, caught in Gloucester and a lettuce wrap with cranberry mayo. Both of the dishes included a fresh apple picked from Brooksby Farm in Peabody to add a fruit to the heavily concentrated vegetable meal. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
School grown kale, cauliflower, and many other vegetables are picked by the cafeteria workers as well as some Green Team members when they are needed for ingredients in the upcoming lunch. The school cafeteria staff prides themselves on making healthy and tasty lunches every day for both middle and high school students alike. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
School grown kale, cauliflower, and many other vegetables are picked by the cafeteria workers as well as some Green Team members when they are needed for ingredients in the upcoming lunch. The school cafeteria staff prides themselves on making healthy and tasty lunches every day for both middle and high school students alike. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Like every day lunches at school, the dining hall provides an assortment of green vegetables from the garden. Green chili peppers are rich in vitamins C and B-6 as well as potassium and the iron that a body needs. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Like every day lunches at school, the dining hall provides an assortment of green vegetables from the garden. Green chili peppers are rich in vitamins C and B-6 as well as potassium and the iron that a body needs. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Kale was cooked with craisins, feta, sunflower seeds and chipotle peppers to give it some extra taste. One cup of raw kale provides more than one hundred percent of the daily recommended intake of vitamins A and K. Kale also comes in many different colors such as white and purple, along with green. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Kale was cooked with craisins, feta, sunflower seeds and chipotle peppers to give it some extra taste. One cup of raw kale provides more than one hundred percent of the daily recommended intake of vitamins A and K. Kale also comes in many different colors such as white and purple, along with green. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Jack Garvey buys his colorful lunch instead of bringing from home. Students were encouraged to buy lunch on Friday to try the healthy eating and open widen their horizons to new foods. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jack Garvey buys his colorful lunch instead of bringing from home. Students were encouraged to buy lunch on Friday to try the healthy eating and open widen their horizons to new foods. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Chemistry Class Completes Soda Lab

On Friday October 24, 2014, a sophomore and junior chemistry class performed a lab on the sugar content in different types of sodas. Chemistry teacher Keith Gray gave the total sugar amounts in 8 ounces of each soda and the students had to figure out the correct amount of sugar in 10-mL of the sodas.

The chemistry class accomplished a lab that determined the sugar content in four sodas. These sodas were cola, ginger ale, orange soda, and grape soda. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The chemistry class accomplished a lab that determined the sugar content in four sodas. These sodas were cola, ginger ale, orange soda, and grape soda. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Chemistry teacher Keith Gray explained the sugar content lab to junior Caisi Calandra. The students in the class had to find the density and the percent of sugar in 10-mL of each soda type. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Chemistry teacher Keith Gray explained the sugar content lab to junior Caisi Calandra. The students in the class had to find the density and the percent of sugar in 10-mL of each soda type. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Kara Hersey and Sarah Reed filled up their 10-mL graduated cylinder with the purple soda. For safety precautions, students must always wear their safety glasses during lab procedures. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Kara Hersey and Sarah Reed filled up their 10-mL graduated cylinder with the purple soda. For safety precautions, students must always wear their safety glasses during lab procedures. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students weighed their graduated cylinders that contained the soda in order to figure out the mass and the density of the sodas. They then used these measurements to calculate the percent of the sugar in 10-mL of the soda. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students weighed their graduated cylinders that contained the soda in order to figure out the mass and the density of the sodas. They then used these measurements to calculate the percent of the sugar in 10-mL of the soda. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Calandra measured 10-mL of cola in her graduated cylinder during the experiment. It is important to always have accurate measurements in order to correctly complete the lab with a low percent error. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Calandra measured 10-mL of cola in her graduated cylinder during the experiment. It is important to always have accurate measurements in order to correctly complete the lab with a low percent error. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Elimination diets aid weight loss, improve health

Traditional diets typically involve decreased caloric intake and rigorous exercise routines. A recent trend called elimination dieting has reduced the complexity of following traditional diets while allowing people to discover their personally healthy eating habits.

During the first stage of elimination diets, dairy and gluten should be completely avoided. This period lasts for four to six weeks in order to completely cleanse the system. Gluten free options are becoming increasingly available as a reaction to elimination diets and to more frequent diagnosis of celiac disease, a gluten intolerance.

Many people go through the majority of their lives suffering from a slight dietary intolerance or mild allergy. Allergies and hypersensitivities cause two types of reactions: immediate and delayed. Immediate reactions are more dangerous, with symptoms ranging from hives to anaphylactic shock. Delayed reactions occur hours or even days after consumption, and usually lead to stomach pains or indigestion.

Those who benefit the most from elimination diets often experience unknown hypersensitivity to common foods that promptly disappear once they pare down their food choices.

Stage two of an elimination diet involves gradually reincorporating the prohibited food groups to see which ones are irritants and which ones are benign.

The motivations behind elimination diets vary greatly, as the simplified eating habits can improve digestive, muscular, and immune health.

For some, eliminating food groups can lead to unexpected weight loss. If one food group causes digestive unrest, it can disrupt the entire digestive process and cause unnecessary weight gain even despite healthful eating and exercise.

Having to restrict gluten and lactose consumption can also cause people to avoid packaged foods, leading to an overall healthier diet comprised more of fresh fruits and vegetables than simple carbohydrates and fattening dairy products.

Although it may be a difficult lifestyle transition from unrestricted dietary options to strict elimination of many common food groups, the weight loss and reduced allergic symptoms are well worth the temporary sacrifice.

 

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School Council reviews chemical health policy; Town Officials, school administrators discuss changes

During the first meeting of the year, School Council members almost unanimously agreed that the high school chemical health policy is in urgent need of reform, said high school Principal Patricia Puglisi.

Students also remarked on the necessity for a new, more articulated policy.

“I don’t really know what the current policy is. I think it’s important to fully explain the new policy to students once it is put into place,” senior Maya Shnider said.

The School Council, which is made up of administrators, teachers, students, parents, and community members, studied drug and alcohol policies from other nearby schools, identifying commonalities and differences between them.

Puglisi said that the current policy contains several inconsistencies, such as different punishments for athletic and non-athletic extracurriculars, as well as a lack of proactive and retroactive education, or education that aims to prevent initial or continued alcohol use.

“I felt as though the policy could contain more, particularly surrounding the idea of education for students. The way it’s written [now] is very punitive. Although there definitely needs to be a consequence, there also should be an educational piece there,” Puglisi said.

The Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) has baseline punishments in place for all athletes who are caught using drugs or alcohol. School Council has indicated a desire to punish not only athletes but also students who participate in non-athletic extracurriculars.

After several meetings where the policy was discussed,  the council invited the police chiefs from Manchester and Essex to have a conversation about how the chemical health policy translates to actual law enforcement.

Manchester Police Chief Glenn McKiel stressed the importance of collaboration between local schools and the police departments, citing the “Memorandum of Understanding” as a useful tool that encourages either entity to share whatever information they have about student involvement with drugs or alcohol.

“I think the police chiefs were able to provide a better understanding of their position in terms of enforcement of specific laws that are on the books in Massachusetts,” Puglisi said, referencing a law that can punish minors for knowingly being in the presence of alcohol even if they themselves do not ingest it.

Both Chief McKiel of Manchester and Chief Silva of Essex expressed their tendency to look at every situation reasonably and holistically and to treat incidents on a case-by-case basis.

“My goal is not to arrest someone; it is to make them understand that there are consequences for every decision each of us makes,” McKiel said.

Puglisi also stressed the ultimate importance of safety as one of the main factors to consider when writing a new policy, echoing McKiel’s statement about keeping students “safe and out of trouble.”

In the coming months, School Council will draft a new policy and then submit it to administrators, student leadership groups, and school committee for review.

“The central goal is always the safety of kids. It’s about learning to make good choices. It’s about learning to look out for one another,” Puglisi said.

 

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Middle school principal implements “Outdoor lunch”

The new middle school principal Steve Guditus has started to bring middle school outside during their lunch block. They are able to run around and release energy before classes in order to maintain focus.

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