Industrial Design students present their creations to peers

As an introductory project to the course, design teacher Caroline Epp had her industrial design class come up with creative solutions to help polar bears whose habitats are being affected by climate change. After giving the students time to do research and construct their creation, the class partook in a group session of critiquing each other’s creations.

 

Senior Tyler Duda inspects his work in progress. The students had to sketch several pictures of what their creation was going to look like before they could begin constructing them. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Tyler Duda inspects his work in progress. The students had to sketch several pictures of what their creation was going to look like before they could begin constructing them. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Josh Richards and Jackson Seal explain the function of their creation.  Their design was unique as it was mostly a wire frame while others used mainly wood. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Josh Richards and Jackson Seal explain the function of their creation. Their design was unique as it was mostly a wire frame while others used mainly wood. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp gave the students access to a closet containing a multitude of art supplies for their project. Some of the items include tin foil, wood glue, and construction paper. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp gave the students access to a closet containing a multitude of art supplies for their project. Some of the items include tin foil, wood glue, and construction paper. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Mariah Litka and Tyler Duda talk about their original design and how they decided to change it. Epp highly encouraged the students to be experimental and creative with their designs even if they must be changed later. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Mariah Litka and Tyler Duda talk about their original design and how they decided to change it. Epp highly encouraged the students to be experimental and creative with their designs even if they must be changed later. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Steven Remsen and Aidan Burbridge present their creation to their peers. The students did research on the polar bear before making their designs so they use this knowledge to make better final products. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Steven Remsen and Aidan Burbridge present their creation to their peers. The students did research on the polar bear before making their designs so they use this knowledge to make better final products. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Konrad Novak presents his group’s unique creation to the table. It was created from pieces of wood, air dry clay, and white fabric, among other things. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Konrad Novak presents his group’s unique creation to the table. It was created from pieces of wood, air dry clay, and white fabric, among other things. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Liam Dingle draws shapes in cardboard for cutting out later. It requires a steady hand to complete a task so precise. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Liam Dingle draws shapes in cardboard for cutting out later. It requires a steady hand to complete a task so precise. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Loyd Waites Presents at ASR Alumni Seminar

After conducting research on MHD radiation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lloyd Waites presents his finding to several classes at the High School including ASR teacher Maria Burgess. He explained the effect of radiation on asteroid orbits.

Waites is enrolled in his second year as a sophomore at RPI in New York. He is a graduate of from Manchester-Essex as of two years ago. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Waites is enrolled in his second year as a sophomore at RPI in New York. He is a graduate of from Manchester-Essex as of two years ago. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
To introduce his research, Waites began talking about the origins of the solar system. He further discussed life on earth with the students. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
To introduce his research, Waites began talking about the origins of the solar system. He further discussed life on earth with the students. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As a result of Waites research, he learned that when a conductive object moves through a conductive fluid, it will emit MHD radiation. This causes the orbit to decay and can drastically alter its position. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As a result of Waites research, he learned that when a conductive object moves through a conductive fluid, it will emit MHD radiation. This causes the orbit to decay and can drastically alter its position. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
This is the simple, algebraic equation representing the rate at which the asteroids decay. In the case of an orbit, the orbit will then decay until it falls into the center. This would affect asteroids, dust, and other components of the early solar system, from the movement of organic molecules, to the formation of planets. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
This is the simple, algebraic equation representing the rate at which the asteroids decay. In the case of an orbit, the orbit will then decay until it falls into the center. This would affect asteroids, dust, and other components of the early solar system, from the movement of organic molecules, to the formation of planets. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Towards the end of the presentation, Waites discussed the importance of taking Authentic Science Research while he was in high school. The class gave him an opportunity to expand his knowledge in different fields of study outside of school. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Towards the end of the presentation, Waites discussed the importance of taking Authentic Science Research while he was in high school. The class gave him an opportunity to expand his knowledge in different fields of study outside of school. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Robotics By the Sea starts season off with a win at its first competition

Robotics By the C took first place in the Savage Soccer Robotics Tournament at the Worchester Polytechnic Institute.

The tournament, which took place on Nov.15, included 48 teams total from all over New England.

The school’s team began meeting in early November to put the robot together.

Each team was given a kit of materials to use to construct the robot.

Robots had to pick up Ping-Pong balls and place them in sloped tubes. They could also lift the tube to a steeper angle.

The winner of each round had to have the highest positioned Ping-Pong ball in the tube.

Robots were rewarded with additional balls for accomplishing certain other tasks as well.

For example, if the robot placed a large cube in a certain section of the field, the team would receive an additional four balls in its tube.

If the robot knocked over the ball dispenser, the team would receive one additional ball.

Senior captain Sam Creighton described the team’s approach to the challenge.

“We decided to do it in large loads. We spent a lot of time trying to make it a very fluid design where things happened quickly but also with control,” he said.

The team chose only to focus on moving the balls to the tube, rather than using the alternative methods to gain balls.

The robot the constructed was “about the size of a sheet of paper,” according to senior captain Julia Whitten.

Whitten said alliances are a key factor in robotics competitions.

Each round consists of two alliances: the red team and the blue team. Each alliance has three teams from different schools, but in each round only two of those teams compete.

Each team is on the randomly selected alliance for the qualifier rounds. They then move on to elimination rounds, during which teams can choose new alliances.

“We’ll keep a list of robots that failed in certain rounds and robots that were less reliable to get an idea of what kind of alliance we want to form,” Whitten said.

The team also made two different robots to allow for as many people to be involved in construction as possible.

Team adviser Joseph McDonough said that getting new members more involved is one of the team’s key goals for the season.

Whitten said the tournament served as a great “introduction for the new kids.”

She said this small-scale tournament provided the perfect opportunity to teach new members how tournaments work without overwhelming them.

The Savage Soccer tournament was a smaller precursor to the final tournament of the season that the team will begin preparing for in January.

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STEM/Industrial Design Students Create Websites with Code

Students in Caroline Epp’s STEM/Industrial Design class learn how to create HTML sites by writing code. The students looked into front end development, which is the component of a website that customers see and interact with. This is the first time Epp has taught the coding unit in her STEM/Industrial Design class.

At the beginning of class, art teacher Caroline Epp reviewed new information about HTML coding to her STEM/Industrial Design students before they broke off to edit their websites.  HTML, one of the main components of web pages, is the content on webpages that is made up of open and closed tags. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
At the beginning of class, art teacher Caroline Epp reviewed new information about HTML coding to her STEM/Industrial Design students before they broke off to edit their websites. HTML, one of the main components of web pages, is the content on webpages that is made up of open and closed tags. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Santana Tosi reads over her wire frame for her website before making changes to the Sublime Text. Subline text is what the students used to write their codes for each part of their website. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Santana Tosi reads over her wire frame for her website before making changes to the Sublime Text. Subline text is what the students used to write their codes for each part of their website. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp helps freshman Jared Zaval make the correct edits to his Sublime Text before seeing the final results on the website. In each Sublime Text, there are tags written between angle brackets and the content shows up on the website as words to the viewer. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp helps freshman Jared Zaval make the correct edits to his Sublime Text before seeing the final results on the website. In each Sublime Text, there are tags written between angle brackets and the content shows up on the website as words to the viewer. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Melanie Carter types in new tags to her source code view to make changes to the actual website. The tags can change the color and size of the text or the color of the background using specific codes.  Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Melanie Carter types in new tags to her source code view to make changes to the actual website. The tags can change the color and size of the text or the color of the background using specific codes. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Alex Beckmann makes some changes to his written plan before executing it in the source code. Epp asked each student to draw out what they want their website to look like before actually creating their own website with code. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Alex Beckmann makes some changes to his written plan before executing it in the source code. Epp asked each student to draw out what they want their website to look like before actually creating their own website with code. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Brendan Driscoll, a junior, used a wire frame to plan out his webpage. He included the box model that uses divisions in HTML to layout the page. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Brendan Driscoll, a junior, used a wire frame to plan out his webpage. He included the box model that uses divisions in HTML to layout the page. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Sublime Text of junior Nathaniel Rautio includes many different tags for each section of his webpage. Epp and the students also looked into the salaries for college interns that work in the coding industry and are making over seven thousand dollars a month. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Sublime Text of junior Nathaniel Rautio includes many different tags for each section of his webpage. Epp and the students also looked into the salaries for college interns that work in the coding industry and are making over seven thousand dollars a month. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Along with HTML and CSS coding, the school also has been teaching other computer languages. The math department teaches another computer programming language, Java to its students. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Along with HTML and CSS coding, the school also has been teaching other computer languages. The math department teaches another computer programming language, Java to its students. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Briant Bradley shows off his personalized web page that includes some of his favorite funny pictures. Each student was able to personalize their made up webpage with anything they wanted to and even learned how to add pictures in the Sublime Text. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Briant Bradley shows off his personalized web page that includes some of his favorite funny pictures. Each student was able to personalize their made up webpage with anything they wanted to and even learned how to add pictures in the Sublime Text. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Chris Brosch, James Riordan, and Ames Sheriff worked together to help each other fix and update their websites. To put text on a webpage, the tags must be put around the words in the Sublime Text that they want to include in the actual webpage.  Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Chris Brosch, James Riordan, and Ames Sheriff worked together to help each other fix and update their websites. To put text on a webpage, the tags must be put around the words in the Sublime Text that they want to include in the actual webpage. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Epp gave each student a packet to reference throughout the whole process that included all the information they’ve learned. Last year, Epp took part in a web design course in Boston where she learned about HTML and CSS coding. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp gave each student a packet to reference throughout the whole process that included all the information they’ve learned. Last year, Epp took part in a web design course in Boston where she learned about HTML and CSS coding. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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STEM class builds Syrian refugee housing models

Students in art teacher Caroline Epp’s Industrial and STEM design class built model Syrian refugee homes during the architecture unit. This year, Epp’s class is not just industrial design, but the students will be working on html/css coding, data visualization, and user experience design as well.

Freshmen Evan Osterman and Marc Sears glue a side on to their refugee house. Before starting to actually build the structures, the students researched what materials would be a best least expensive fit for the houses. They also completed research questions about the Syrian crisis. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Evan Osterman and Marc Sears glue a side on to their refugee house. Before starting to actually build the structures, the students researched what materials would be a best least expensive fit for the houses. They also completed research questions about the Syrian crisis. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Craig Carter and junior Alex Beckmann hot glue one of the final pieces onto the roof of their project. The students had to go through a test and evaluate process in which they focused on the strengths and weaknesses before being able to finish the project completely. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Craig Carter and junior Alex Beckmann hot glue one of the final pieces onto the roof of their project. The students had to go through a test and evaluate process in which they focused on the strengths and weaknesses before being able to finish the project completely. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The freshman team of Chris Brosch, Ames Sheriff, and James Riordan place their materials accordingly, following their design plan. This team used balsa wood, hot glue, and air dry clay. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The freshman team of Chris Brosch, Ames Sheriff, and James Riordan place their materials accordingly, following their design plan. This team used balsa wood, hot glue, and air dry clay. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Riordan opens up his account on Trello to review the design plans he made with his group. Trello, along with Sketch Up, are websites used to help format design plans and come up with blueprints to follow before making the actual product. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Riordan opens up his account on Trello to review the design plans he made with his group. Trello, along with Sketch Up, are websites used to help format design plans and come up with blueprints to follow before making the actual product. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Brendan Driscoll forms the air dry clay on the roof of his refugee home to his liking. Driscoll, like some other groups, opted to use the clay for the extra parts of his structure because it is not stable enough for the assembly of the whole building. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Brendan Driscoll forms the air dry clay on the roof of his refugee home to his liking. Driscoll, like some other groups, opted to use the clay for the extra parts of his structure because it is not stable enough for the assembly of the whole building. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Brosch glues a part onto the house while Sheriff rolls the air dry clay for a finishing touch. In the design process, the students were asked to split up the building tasks between each person on the team to make the fabrication go smoothly. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Brosch glues a part onto the house while Sheriff rolls the air dry clay for a finishing touch. In the design process, the students were asked to split up the building tasks between each person on the team to make the fabrication go smoothly. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While building their refugee home, juniors Briant Bradley and Eddie Beauregard discuss the nest step in the construction process. Each team had to come up with multiple ideas and make thumbnail sketches in the deign process, but they could only chose one for the final project. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While building their refugee home, juniors Briant Bradley and Eddie Beauregard discuss the nest step in the construction process. Each team had to come up with multiple ideas and make thumbnail sketches in the deign process, but they could only chose one for the final project. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The refugee house made by sophomore Melanie Carter and junior Amanda Loebelenz was one of the first finished products in the class. Carter and Loebelenz added their own finishing touches to the assignment by making miniature bunk beds and a ladder while the other students finished up. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The refugee house made by sophomore Melanie Carter and junior Amanda Loebelenz was one of the first finished products in the class. Carter and Loebelenz added their own finishing touches to the assignment by making miniature bunk beds and a ladder while the other students finished up. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seniors measure hang time

During the week of October 6th, Deb Nolan’s honors physics classes participated in a vertical jump lab to test force over time. Each class split up into groups to use the force plate and record their results.

Senior physics teacher Deb Nolan has set up a force plate for her honors physics students to complete the standing vertical jump lab. The force plate is connected to Nolan’s computer, which transfers the data from the jump to a graph on the screen. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior physics teacher Deb Nolan has set up a force plate for her honors physics students to complete the standing vertical jump lab. The force plate is connected to Nolan’s computer, which transfers the data from the jump to a graph on the screen. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Steven Ascolillo demonstrates the lab by jumping from standing position on the force plate after getting the go signal from senior volunteer Will Burgess at the computer. On the computer, Burgess is able to see the amount of force that is put on the plate by Ascolillo over the time of his jump. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Steven Ascolillo demonstrates the lab by jumping from standing position on the force plate after getting the go signal from senior volunteer Will Burgess at the computer. On the computer, Burgess is able to see the amount of force that is put on the plate by Ascolillo over the time of his jump. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The graph that is presented on the projector shows what the force plate felt before, during, and after the jump. The large drop in the center of the graph shows the hang time of Ascolillo’s jump when he was not touching the plate at all. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The graph that is presented on the projector shows what the force plate felt before, during, and after the jump. The large drop in the center of the graph shows the hang time of Ascolillo’s jump when he was not touching the plate at all. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Nolan asks Ascolillo to plot the starting point of the jump to the ending point of the jump on the board to see his hang time. The hang time is judged by the amount of time that there is no force on the plate at all. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Nolan asks Ascolillo to plot the starting point of the jump to the ending point of the jump on the board to see his hang time. The hang time is judged by the amount of time that there is no force on the plate at all. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Clubs Hold Information Fair

On September 11th, various clubs set up tables in the dining hall to share information about their organizations. Students take part in signing up for the many available clubs and activities the school community provides. Club meetings will be happening continuously throughout the year.

 

Junior Chelsea Rose represents the DECA Team in the club fair. She encourages students to sign up for the program and explains the clubs importance to the community. DECA, run by Dean Martino, is a marketing organization that has opportunities for students to compete in national competitions .Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Chelsea Rose represents the DECA Team in the club fair. She encourages students to sign up for the program and explains the clubs importance to the community. DECA, run by Dean Martino, is a marketing organization that has opportunities for students to compete in national competitions .Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students actively sign up for school clubs during first, second, and third lunches. Interest has been drawn to many of the available extracurricular activities for students. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students actively sign up for school clubs during first, second, and third lunches. Interest has been drawn to many of the available extracurricular activities for students. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
With permission from the administration, junior Erin Carlson decided to start her own club dedicated to the human treatment of animals. The club fair raised the clubs popularity as many students took the opportunity to sign up. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
With permission from the administration, junior Erin Carlson decided to start her own club dedicated to the humane treatment of animals. The club fair raised the clubs popularity as many students took the opportunity to sign up. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

On the way to lunch, students get a chance to see what Robotics-by-the-Sea has worked on last year. Senior Julia Whitten and junior Brendan Driscoll encourage students to take part in the club. In 2012, the robotics club came in as finalists the FRC 2012 Boston regional competition. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the way to lunch, students get a chance to see what Robotics-by-the-Sea has worked on last year. Senior Julia Whitten and junior Brendan Driscoll encourage students to take part in the club. In 2012, the robotics club came in as finalists the FRC 2012 Boston regional competition. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh Grade Engineering Class Launches Bottle Rockets

Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx instructs the annual bottle rocket project with his seventh grade classes.  The students collected plastic bottles and transformed them into rockets by adding wings and tops.  The seventh graders then launched their bottles and recorded the data.

Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx draws examples of good and bad wing types for the students’ rockets.  Bannister-Marx explains that large, jagged wings are not as aerodynamic as small, straight ones. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx draws examples of good and bad wing types for the students’ rockets. Bannister-Marx explains that large, jagged wings are not as aerodynamic as small, straight ones. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Jack Julien glue extra parts to their bottle in order to make it more durable.  Schwartz hot glues a piece of Styrofoam intending for it to be attached to the side of the rocket while Julien glues half of a foam football on top of the bottle. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Jack Julien glue extra parts to their bottle in order to make it more durable. Schwartz hot glues a piece of Styrofoam intending for it to be attached to the side of the rocket while Julien glues half of a foam football on top of the bottle. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students draw diagrams of what they want their bottle rockets to look like.  They use tennis balls and foam cones to protect the top of their bottle when it hits the ground after launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students draw diagrams of what they want their bottle rockets to look like. They use tennis balls and foam cones to protect the top of their bottle when it hits the ground after launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grader John Crehan researches effective bottle rockets.  The students were required to look up various types in order to figure out the most aerodynamic and durable kind of rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader John Crehan researches effective bottle rockets. The students were required to look up various types in order to figure out the most aerodynamic and durable kind of rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Many students cut tennis balls in half using a miniature hand saw and a clamp attached to the side of a table to hold it in place.  The seventh graders then attached them to the end of their rockets so that there would be less damage upon impact. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Many students cut tennis balls in half using a miniature hand saw and a clamp attached to the side of a table to hold it in place. The seventh graders then attached them to the end of their rockets so that there would be less damage upon impact. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A couple of days before the project began, students collected both 1 and 2 liter soda and seltzer bottles.  Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A couple of days before the project began, students collected both 1 and 2 liter soda and seltzer bottles. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the class waits on the sidelines as a team launches their rocket.  The students were responsible for measuring the angle of the rocket at its maximum height and the distance away from the launch pad in order to find the height that it flew. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the class waits on the sidelines as a team launches their rocket. The students were responsible for measuring the angle of the rocket at its maximum height and the distance away from the launch pad in order to find the height that it flew. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Emma Cochand and Clara Davis fix the broken wings of their rocket using duct tape before their initial launch.  Bannister-Marx assigned partnerships for this project who worked on their bottles for a few days before launching. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Emma Cochand and Clara Davis fix the broken wings of their rocket using duct tape before their initial launch. Bannister-Marx assigned partnerships for this project who worked on their bottles for a few days before launching. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Banister-Marx holds the base of the pump steady so the pressure of the water doesn’t move the base. The pump uses 80 units of water pressure to launch each rocket into the air. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Banister-Marx holds the base of the pump steady so the pressure of the water doesn’t move the base. The pump uses 80 units of water pressure to launch each rocket into the air. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Schwartz repairs his rocket after his group’s firs launch using duct tape to keep the wings intact. Each group were given sufficient time before each launch to prepare their rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Schwartz repairs his rocket after his group’s firs launch using duct tape to keep the wings intact. Each group were given sufficient time before each launch to prepare their rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Ike Maloney records the height and distance of another team’s rocket as he prepares to launch his own rocket.  There were always one or two teams getting their rockets ready for flight as one team launches and the other teams wait on the sidelines. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Ike Maloney records the height and distance of another team’s rocket as he prepares to launch his own rocket. There were always one or two teams getting their rockets ready for flight as one team launches and the other teams wait on the sidelines. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before each launch, students filled their bottles about half way with water using funnels to not spill any water on the turf. The more pressure pumped into the rocket, the higher it will fly. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before each launch, students filled their bottles about half way with water using funnels to not spill any water on the turf. The more pressure pumped into the rocket, the higher it will fly. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While one student pumps the water pressure into the rocket, the other student prepares to pull the string over their head to initiate the launch. This is the reason why Bannister-Marx split the groups into two, so that each student would have a role in the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While one student pumps the water pressure into the rocket, the other student prepares to pull the string over their head to initiate the launch. This is the reason why Bannister-Marx split the groups into two, so that each student would have a role in the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Libby Graves pumps 80 units of pressure into the rocket. Graves and Bannister-Marx wear protective goggles in case anything goes wrong during the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Libby Graves pumps 80 units of pressure into the rocket. Graves and Bannister-Marx wear protective goggles in case anything goes wrong during the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students typically used small, pointed wings to increase stability and height of their rockets.  They also used foam cones and tennis balls in order to make the bottles durable enough to endure multiple flights. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students typically used small, pointed wings to increase stability and height of their rockets. They also used foam cones and tennis balls in order to make the bottles durable enough to endure multiple flights. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

After all of the teams launched their rockets twice, the students returned to the classroom and recorded the data of their best launch on the white board.  This was in order to compare the teams’ results to see whose rockets flew the highest. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After all of the teams launched their rockets twice, the students returned to the classroom and recorded the data of their best launch on the white board. This was in order to compare the teams’ results to see whose rockets flew the highest. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Engineering Class Makes Scoreboard

On Wednesday March 26, 2014, John Bannister Marx and Dave Veling’s high school engineering class wired together an electrical charge scoreboard. Students in the class were given an assignment to connect pieces to create a scoreboard which will light up when it is all connected correctly. Students had to learn how to read and write Binary Code Sequences that show what light circuit turns on and what like circuit is off.

Richards help out students from the other tables, struggling to finished and light up their score board. Junior Julia Geswell watches intently on how he is  putting the pieces together.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Richards help out students from the other tables, struggling to finished and light up their score board. Junior Julia Geswell watches intently on how he is putting the pieces together.
Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bannister-Marx and Veling handed out the score board kits to every set of partners in the class. The kits contained: Llight bulb holders, snaps, a speaker, and wires. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bannister-Marx and Veling handed out the score board kits to every set of partners in the class. The kits contained: Llight bulb holders, snaps, a speaker, and wires. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Turning the switch to power the score board, sophomore Josh Richards contemplates the design of this Binary Code Sequence structure. Richards worked by connecting snaps together that will keep the charges closed so the board was able to light up. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Turning the switch to power the score board, sophomore Josh Richards contemplates the design of this Binary Code Sequence structure. Richards worked by connecting snaps together that will keep the charges closed so the board was able to light up. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Trying to connect the pieces to a puzzle, partners Tim Grimes and Veronica Attridge work together, holding the pieces down steadily while the one of them connects more snaps. There are snaps that have only one on them and others that go up to having seven snaps on them. All snaps were needed during the process of creating this board. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Trying to connect the pieces to a puzzle, partners Tim Grimes and Veronica Attridge work together, holding the pieces down steadily while the one of them connects more snaps. There are snaps that have only one on them and others that go up to having seven snaps on them. All snaps were needed during the process of creating this board. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In a finished scoreboard, everything is connected to something. In order to make the lights turn on. The on/off switch is the open/closed circuit. It is the one thing that determines whether the charge will go through and start up the board’s lights. Credit:  Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In a finished scoreboard, everything is connected to something. In order to make the lights turn on. The on/off switch is the open/closed circuit. It is the one thing that determines whether the charge will go through and start up the board’s lights. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bannister-Marx explains the worksheet and how to code the zero and make it light up. The workbooks contained information on how to code and decode the score boards and how to make them light up without a plug. It all has to do with the connections of the snaps and wires. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bannister-Marx explains the worksheet and how to code the zero and make it light up. The workbooks contained information on how to code and decode the score boards and how to make them light up without a plug. It all has to do with the connections of the snaps and wires. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Julia Geswell puts together the pieces of the scoreboard. Before the class tried to create the scoreboard everyone got handed out a box full of batteries, wires and light bulbs. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Julia Geswell puts together the pieces of the scoreboard. Before the class tried to create the scoreboard everyone got handed out a box full of batteries, wires and light bulbs. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
This is what the final product looked like. This activity helped showed the student how circuits are used. Its shows what connect to what and to show where the wires go. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
This is what the final product looked like. This activity helped showed the student how circuits are used. Its shows what connect to what and to show where the wires go. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As the student gradually worked through the activity they would take the materials that they need out of this box. By the end of the activity half of the materials would be used. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As the student gradually worked through the activity they would take the materials that they need out of this box. By the end of the activity half of the materials would be used. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the activity everyone in the class would do a worksheet. This worksheet helps the students learn what an open and closed circuit looks like. The students would use a one for and open circuit and a zero to show that it is a closed circuit. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the activity everyone in the class would do a worksheet. This worksheet helps the students learn what an open and closed circuit looks like. The students would use a one for and open circuit and a zero to show that it is a closed circuit. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Tim Grimes and Veronica Attridge put the last piece of their scoreboard on the plastic platform and switch the one switch to see if it works. After Grimes and Attridge find that their scoreboard works,  they work on the worksheet in their workbook. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Tim Grimes and Veronica Attridge put the last piece of their scoreboard on the plastic platform and switch the one switch to see if it works. After Grimes and Attridge find that their scoreboard works, they work on the worksheet in their workbook. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Working progressively,  freshmen Aisea Collens focuses on how to connect the snaps in order to light the board. Collens had yet to light the score board but worked through the problems progressively and eventually lighting it and getting all of the numbers. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Working progressively, freshmen Aisea Collens focuses on how to connect the snaps in order to light the board. Collens had yet to light the score board but worked through the problems progressively and eventually lighting it and getting all of the numbers. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Geswell and Ford connecting pieces to the board, ready to set up their scoreboard. Working together they finished and got the scoreboard lit up within their next five minutes working together. They were one of the first to complete the project of the board and continued to help others with their work.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Geswell and Ford connecting pieces to the board, ready to set up their scoreboard. Working together they finished and got the scoreboard lit up within their next five minutes working together. They were one of the first to complete the project of the board and continued to help others with their work.
Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Engineering class launches rockets

Seventh graders participate in an annual engineering project, creating rockets to shoot as high as possible into the air. Engineering teacher John Banister-Marx leads his class in using cardboard, recycled bottles, and materials to create rockets. Students then measure how high the rockets go after launching them with Banister-Marx’s assistance.

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