Green Team Builds Hydroponic and AquaPonics Project

Students in the Manchester Essex Green Team have created a simple yet effective environmentally friendly garden, out of the normal growing season. Their goal is to provide and create organic food for students. The definition of hydroponics is a subset of hydro culture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil.

The Green Teams students Belle Allmendinger, Justin Eichenburger, and Louis Masella created a healthy way to grow food. The aquaponics system combines aquaculture which is the farming of fish and hydroponics which is the raising of plants without soil. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Green Teams students Belle Allmendinger, Justin Eichenburger, and Louis Masella created a healthy way to grow food. The aquaponics system combines aquaculture which is the farming of fish and hydroponics which is the raising of plants without soil. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In some of the Aquaponic structures there are gold fish. Nutrients for the plants come from fish waste.  The plants act as a bio filter, and they clean the water making it a healthy living space for the fish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In some of the Aquaponic structures there are gold fish. Nutrients for the plants come from fish waste. The plants act as a bio filter, and they clean the water making it a healthy living space for the fish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
There are six aquaponic structures built on the third floor by the Green Team room. The students plan to build 10 of them with the help of their diagrams, blueprints and extensive research. Students have a budget which they must follow even though they plan to get the most out of each aquaponic. The total cost for 10 units is $1960. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
There are six aquaponic structures built on the third floor by the Green Team room. The students plan to build 10 of them with the help of their diagrams, blueprints and extensive research. Students have a budget which they must follow even though they plan to get the most out of each aquaponic. The total cost for 10 units is $1960. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
They types of plants that will grow in the aquaponics are selected by limitation of nutrients.  They plan on growing a small amount of Lettuce, basil, mint, chives and arugula due to it being their first time using and working with aquaponics. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
They types of plants that will grow in the aquaponics are selected by limitation of nutrients. They plan on growing a small amount of Lettuce, basil, mint, chives and arugula due to it being their first time using and working with aquaponics. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hydroponic towers provide an environmentally friendly option of growing food, in the winter time. Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and they are methods of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, with soil. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hydroponic towers provide an environmentally friendly option of growing food, in the winter time. Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and they are methods of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, with soil. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students plan on constructing 30 towers, so far they have 10. The jug holds the pump and the tower, and water is then cycled through the tower moving from the pump, up the tubes and to the top. The water then drips down to have a constant flow of water hitting the Rockwool seeds. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students plan on constructing 30 towers, so far they have 10. The jug holds the pump and the tower, and water is then cycled through the tower moving from the pump, up the tubes and to the top. The water then drips down to have a constant flow of water hitting the Rockwool seeds. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Goldfish were the best option for the auqaponics because they are the easiest to take care of and can withstand the changing of conditions. Goldfish can survive in 40-80 degrees. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Goldfish were the best option for the auqaponics because they are the easiest to take care of and can withstand the changing of conditions. Goldfish can survive in 40-80 degrees. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Bio Anthropology class gets claws

As an introduction to their unit on primates, students tried to accomplish fine motor tasks with fake claws attached to their fingers. One of the characteristics that all primates, including humans, have is having nails instead of claws, as well as sensitive tactile tissue at the ends of their digits. This allows primates to manipulate objects precisely.

Some of the tasks were to pick up dimes off a flat surface, tie knots in a string, thread a needle, and write a sentence with a short pencil. The students struggled with the tasks and were able to compared the experience to their usual “non-clawed” hands. Students were timed during the tasks with Devon Musgrave-Johnson as the winner of the “Claw Olympics”.

The students then learned about the rest of the characteristics, such as binocular stereoscopic vision and large brain to body size ratios. They then each picked groupings of primates to research for a class presentation.

 

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Moth Lab Explains Evolution

Tuesday march 24th students in Biology teacher Erica Everett’s B block class worked together on a lab on evolution and natural selection. Students filled out a chart afterward on how peppered moths work with Darwin’s Theory on Evolution.

Students work together in pairs on the peppered moth lab, about Charles Darwin’s theory of Natural Selection. Sophomores Cole Bourbon and Evan Williams review  their papers for instructions, and then perform the lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students work together in pairs on the peppered moth lab, about Charles Darwin’s theory of Natural Selection. Sophomores Cole Bourbon and Evan Williams review their papers for instructions, and then perform the lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Erica Everett explains to students the objective of the lab. Students were given a piece of  “dark bark” and a piece of “light bark.” Students had to blend both light and dark moths onto the given piece of paper, and decide which ones were easiest to see. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Erica Everett explains to students the objective of the lab. Students were given a piece of “dark bark” and a piece of “light bark.” Students had to blend both light and dark moths onto the given piece of paper, and decide which ones were easiest to see. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Elizabeth Eichenburger prepares the bins with the materials students need. Each bin contains a dark piece of paper (dark bark) , with dark cut outs (moths), and a light piece of paper (light bark) with light cut outs  (moths). Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Elizabeth Eichenburger prepares the bins with the materials students need. Each bin contains a dark piece of paper (dark bark) , with dark cut outs (moths), and a light piece of paper (light bark) with light cut outs (moths). Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students also filled out a packet of surveys during their lab. Sophomores Jacob Callahan and Liam Martin work together on answering the fill in the blank sentences, on what they have learned in their lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students also filled out a packet of surveys during their lab. Sophomores Jacob Callahan and Liam Martin work together on answering the fill in the blank sentences, on what they have learned in their lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett writes a chart on Darwin’s Theory, and students filled in the blank spaces on the bottom. The chart consisted of Genetic Variation, over production, the struggle for existence, different reproductive success, and the definition of evolution. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett writes a chart on Darwin’s Theory, and students filled in the blank spaces on the bottom. The chart consisted of Genetic Variation, over production, the struggle for existence, different reproductive success, and the definition of evolution. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the worksheet students filled in blank spaces with the correct answers. Students drew a food chain of grass to moths and then to birds. Birds eat moths and moths eat grass. The worksheets were about the industrial revolution and how it rapidly changed the evolution of light moths to dark moths. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the worksheet students filled in blank spaces with the correct answers. Students drew a food chain of grass to moths and then to birds. Birds eat moths and moths eat grass. The worksheets were about the industrial revolution and how it rapidly changed the evolution of light moths to dark moths. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The chart on natural selection given as a rubric to students. Students created their own and filled in facts that they learned during this lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The chart on natural selection given as a rubric to students. Students created their own and filled in facts that they learned during this lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Martin fills out the back page of the worksheet, with facts on the trends he saw with the surviving moths. The chart  had the original number of moths for the light  on dark wood, and the dark on dark wood. Students over time had to decide which color moth had a better chance of surving on a specific color bark. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Martin fills out the back page of the worksheet, with facts on the trends he saw with the surviving moths. The chart had the original number of moths for the light on dark wood, and the dark on dark wood. Students over time had to decide which color moth had a better chance of surving on a specific color bark. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Light moths on dark bark were much more visible than the dark moths on the dark bark. Students used a pair of forceps to pick off the more visible moths in only a quick amount of time. The forceps were considered to be birds, because birds prey on moths.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Light moths on dark bark were much more visible than the dark moths on the dark bark. Students used a pair of forceps to pick off the more visible moths in only a quick amount of time. The forceps were considered to be birds, because birds prey on moths. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Ann Landry speaks to students about the directions of the project. Confirmed by Everett, students were asked to fill out the questions with as much detail as they could put into their answers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Ann Landry speaks to students about the directions of the project. Confirmed by Everett, students were asked to fill out the questions with as much detail as they could put into their answers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Emily Dahlen uses forceps to pick and choose which moths to take off of her page of bark. The lighter moths are a lot more visible than the darker ones seen on the page. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Emily Dahlen uses forceps to pick and choose which moths to take off of her page of bark. The lighter moths are a lot more visible than the darker ones seen on the page. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Industrial Design students present their creations to peers

As an introductory project to the course, design teacher Caroline Epp had her industrial design class come up with creative solutions to help polar bears whose habitats are being affected by climate change. After giving the students time to do research and construct their creation, the class partook in a group session of critiquing each other’s creations.

 

Senior Tyler Duda inspects his work in progress. The students had to sketch several pictures of what their creation was going to look like before they could begin constructing them. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Tyler Duda inspects his work in progress. The students had to sketch several pictures of what their creation was going to look like before they could begin constructing them. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Josh Richards and Jackson Seal explain the function of their creation.  Their design was unique as it was mostly a wire frame while others used mainly wood. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Josh Richards and Jackson Seal explain the function of their creation. Their design was unique as it was mostly a wire frame while others used mainly wood. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp gave the students access to a closet containing a multitude of art supplies for their project. Some of the items include tin foil, wood glue, and construction paper. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Epp gave the students access to a closet containing a multitude of art supplies for their project. Some of the items include tin foil, wood glue, and construction paper. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Mariah Litka and Tyler Duda talk about their original design and how they decided to change it. Epp highly encouraged the students to be experimental and creative with their designs even if they must be changed later. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Mariah Litka and Tyler Duda talk about their original design and how they decided to change it. Epp highly encouraged the students to be experimental and creative with their designs even if they must be changed later. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Steven Remsen and Aidan Burbridge present their creation to their peers. The students did research on the polar bear before making their designs so they use this knowledge to make better final products. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Steven Remsen and Aidan Burbridge present their creation to their peers. The students did research on the polar bear before making their designs so they use this knowledge to make better final products. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Konrad Novak presents his group’s unique creation to the table. It was created from pieces of wood, air dry clay, and white fabric, among other things. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Konrad Novak presents his group’s unique creation to the table. It was created from pieces of wood, air dry clay, and white fabric, among other things. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Liam Dingle draws shapes in cardboard for cutting out later. It requires a steady hand to complete a task so precise. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Liam Dingle draws shapes in cardboard for cutting out later. It requires a steady hand to complete a task so precise. Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Alex Lehar for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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ASR II students chosen to present at the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium

Congratulations to the following ASR II students for being selected to present their ASR summer research at the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium at UNH on March 26-27. The title and location of their presentations are included below.  
 
Poster presentations:
 
Patrick Byrne, ”Constructing a Radio-Controlled Ornithopter Prototype and Three-Dimensional Model”, Worcester Polytech Institutue
 
Sam Creighton, Design and Testing of Laboratory Experiences for an Introductory Mechanical Engineering Course”, Boston Univ
 
Leo Gallo de la Paz, Designing Cost Effective Wind Turbines”, MIT
 
Aidan Lyons, Atlantic and Shortnose Sturgeon Infomercial”, Nat’l Oceanic & Atmospheric Association
 
Lucas Martz, The Effects of Perfluorinated Compounds PFOS and PFOA on Beluga Whale Immunity”, Univ of Connecticut
 
Jacob Przesiak, “Modeling the Spectral Energy Emissions of Blazars BLLAC and OJ287 By Data Fitting Observed Spectral Emissions From Internal Shock Events”,Boston Univ
 
Alex Tognazzi, Chemical Analysis of a Community’s Drinking Water”, North Andover Water Treatment Facility
 
Oral presentation:
 
Julia Whitten, General Versus Specific: A Study on the Advantages and Disadvantages of the MitoCarta Set and the Allelic Set for Gene Analysis for Huntington’s Disease”, Mass General Hosp

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8th Graders Construct Residential Structures

On Thursday February 5th, John Bannister-Marx’s eighth grade engineering class worked on constructing miniature residential homes. The students designed a bird’s eye view of the interior of the one floor home any way they liked, but they had to scale sizes down to being able to fit on a one 1×1’ piece of cardboard.

 

Patiently waiting for her glue to dry, eighth grader Kaya Crandall holds her cardboard in place to form one of the four outer walls to her house. Crandall precisely measured how big each room in her building should be. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Patiently waiting for her glue to dry, eighth grader Kaya Crandall holds her cardboard in place to form one of the four outer walls to her house. Crandall precisely measured how big each room in her building should be. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Recently the middle school has invested in a three dimensional visual printer. Teacher John Bannister-Marx explains how the printer works, and what comes out of it. Students are encouraged to use the printer, supervised by the teachers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Recently the middle school has invested in a three dimensional visual printer. Teacher John Bannister-Marx explains how the printer works, and what comes out of it. Students are encouraged to use the printer, supervised by the teachers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The 3D printing process begins by making a virtual design of the object one wants to make. The scanner on the printer makes a digital copy of a computer aided design and then puts it into a 3D modeling program. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The 3D printing process begins by making a virtual design of the object one wants to make. The scanner on the printer makes a digital copy of a computer aided design and then puts it into a 3D modeling program. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The material used for the 3D products is a hard plastic made from starch. The Maker-Bot Replicator 2, also known as the 3D printer is a safe, student accessible machine. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The material used for the 3D products is a hard plastic made from starch. The Maker-Bot Replicator 2, also known as the 3D printer is a safe, student accessible machine. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students work delicately and precisely. Students ask questions when needed. Bannister-Marx walks around the room routinely checking on students and how far along their work are coming. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students work delicately and precisely. Students ask questions when needed. Bannister-Marx walks around the room routinely checking on students and how far along their work are coming. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Questions are commonly asked on how to use certain tools, or for measurement checks.  Tucker Spencer and Haley Wolf are shown how to mark correct room dimensions by Bannister-Marx. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Questions are commonly asked on how to use certain tools, or for measurement checks. Tucker Spencer and Haley Wolf are shown how to mark correct room dimensions by Bannister-Marx. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Every student enrolled in engineering had this project. Students were allowed to make their house more of a ‘home’. Creativity was key to this project; they furnished and painted their houses however they wanted. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Every student enrolled in engineering had this project. Students were allowed to make their house more of a ‘home’. Creativity was key to this project; they furnished and painted their houses however they wanted. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Loyd Waites Presents at ASR Alumni Seminar

After conducting research on MHD radiation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lloyd Waites presents his finding to several classes at the High School including ASR teacher Maria Burgess. He explained the effect of radiation on asteroid orbits.

Waites is enrolled in his second year as a sophomore at RPI in New York. He is a graduate of from Manchester-Essex as of two years ago. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Waites is enrolled in his second year as a sophomore at RPI in New York. He is a graduate of from Manchester-Essex as of two years ago. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
To introduce his research, Waites began talking about the origins of the solar system. He further discussed life on earth with the students. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
To introduce his research, Waites began talking about the origins of the solar system. He further discussed life on earth with the students. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As a result of Waites research, he learned that when a conductive object moves through a conductive fluid, it will emit MHD radiation. This causes the orbit to decay and can drastically alter its position. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As a result of Waites research, he learned that when a conductive object moves through a conductive fluid, it will emit MHD radiation. This causes the orbit to decay and can drastically alter its position. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
This is the simple, algebraic equation representing the rate at which the asteroids decay. In the case of an orbit, the orbit will then decay until it falls into the center. This would affect asteroids, dust, and other components of the early solar system, from the movement of organic molecules, to the formation of planets. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
This is the simple, algebraic equation representing the rate at which the asteroids decay. In the case of an orbit, the orbit will then decay until it falls into the center. This would affect asteroids, dust, and other components of the early solar system, from the movement of organic molecules, to the formation of planets. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Towards the end of the presentation, Waites discussed the importance of taking Authentic Science Research while he was in high school. The class gave him an opportunity to expand his knowledge in different fields of study outside of school. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Towards the end of the presentation, Waites discussed the importance of taking Authentic Science Research while he was in high school. The class gave him an opportunity to expand his knowledge in different fields of study outside of school. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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High School Class Dissects A Pig

High School students learned the muscle parts of a pig. Two groups of senior students dissected piglets and had to find all the muscle parts.

While dissecting the piglet, students used a handout of the pigs muscles. Students could reflect back to the handout any time during the dissecting process. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While dissecting the piglet, students used a handout of the pigs muscles. Students could reflect back to the handout any time during the dissecting process. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Each group of students had to dissect a piglet. When dissecting, the students had to match each muscle from the handout. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Each group of students had to dissect a piglet. When dissecting, the students had to match each muscle from the handout. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The first group of seniors helped each other define what each muscle was. Students would take turns cutting and looking at each muscle. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The first group of seniors helped each other define what each muscle was. Students would take turns cutting and looking at each muscle. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Biology teacher Maria Burgess helps students define what muscle are which. Burgess would help the students cut any muscle out of the body. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Maria Burgess helps students define what muscle are which. Burgess would help the students cut any muscle out of the body. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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While dissecting the piglet, students used a handout of the pigs muscles. Students could reflect back to the handout any time during the dissecting process. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While dissecting the piglet, students used a handout of the pigs muscles. Students could reflect back to the handout any time during the dissecting process. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Students research health in a holistic fashion

In health teacher Eric Magers’s class, freshmen, sophomores, and a junior create powerpoint presentations on certain topics relating to healthy or unhealthy aspects of human life.

Sophomores Amber Paré and Madeleine Conway present their research on proper nutrition and diet.  Paré and Conway stress the importance of a healthy diet, which refers to eating full, nutritious meals that include all of the food groups.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Amber Paré and Madeleine Conway present their research on proper nutrition and diet. Paré and Conway stress the importance of a healthy diet, which refers to eating full, nutritious meals that include all of the food groups. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Avery Shaw and Annabelle Lord-Patey inform their class about healthy and abusive relationships and bullying.  Bullying is a major problem, as more than 1/2 of students have personally witnessed bullying at their school.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Avery Shaw and Annabelle Lord-Patey inform their class about healthy and abusive relationships and bullying. Bullying is a major problem, as more than 1/2 of students have personally witnessed bullying at their school. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Tommy Tofuri and junior Nathaniel Evans educate their peers on the topic of the human life cycle.  The main stages of the human life cycle are infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Tommy Tofuri and junior Nathaniel Evans educate their peers on the topic of the human life cycle. The main stages of the human life cycle are infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Matthew Kenney display their knowledge about lifestyle diseases.  Lifestyle diseases are caused by actions, behavior, and choices in one’s everyday life.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Matthew Kenney display their knowledge about lifestyle diseases. Lifestyle diseases are caused by actions, behavior, and choices in one’s everyday life. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robbie Sarmanian and Christian Hadagh exhibit their information on personal safety.  Sarmanian and Hadagh explain an acronym that outlines what one should do in a survival situation:S.T.O.P.  The S stands for sit down, the T is think, the O is observe, and the P is plan.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robbie Sarmanian and Christian Hadagh exhibit their information on personal safety. Sarmanian and Hadagh explain an acronym that outlines what one should do in a survival situation:S.T.O.P. The S stands for sit down, the T is think, the O is observe, and the P is plan. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Ethan Ketchum and freshman Jared Zaval explain learning disabilities.  Ketchum and Zaval describe ADHD, (which is attention deficit hyperactive disorder), autism, (which affects communication and social skills), and dyslexia (which is a developmental reading disorder).  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ethan Ketchum and freshman Jared Zaval explain learning disabilities. Ketchum and Zaval describe ADHD, (which is attention deficit hyperactive disorder), autism, (which affects communication and social skills), and dyslexia (which is a developmental reading disorder). Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Chemistry Class Compares the Ratios of Moles of Iron to Copper

On Tuesday December 16 and Wednesday December 17, chemistry students completed a lab finding the mole measurements of iron and copper sulfate. The lab taught the students how to accurately measure substances in order to receive the best results.

Juniors Hannah White and Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon set up the apparatus for the experiment.  The experiment consisted of reacting copper sulfate crystals and iron filings in water. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Hannah White and Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon set up the apparatus for the experiment. The experiment consisted of reacting copper sulfate crystals and iron filings in water. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Molly Lynch stirred the heated substance during the lab. It is important to continuously stir and to make sure that the substance does not boil in order to find the best results in this experiment. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Molly Lynch stirred the heated substance during the lab. It is important to continuously stir and to make sure that the substance does not boil in order to find the best results in this experiment. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students in the lab had to stir the copper sulfate and iron mixture while it was heating for ten minutes with a Bunsen burner. During this time, the reaction made the substance turn red and the water turn green. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students in the lab had to stir the copper sulfate and iron mixture while it was heating for ten minutes with a Bunsen burner. During this time, the reaction made the substance turn red and the water turn green. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After letting the copper sulfate dry overnight, the students weighed its mass on a balance. Chemistry labs usually take only one day but the class completed this lab in two days. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After letting the copper sulfate dry overnight, the students weighed its mass on a balance. Chemistry labs usually take only one day but the class completed this lab in two days. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

After finding all of the data, the students in the class completed all of the calculations in their lab packets. Junior Caisi Calandra asked Chemistry teacher Keith Gray a question about how to find the ratio of moles of iron to the ratio of moles of copper.   Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After finding all of the data, the students in the class completed all of the calculations in their lab packets. Junior Caisi Calandra asked Chemistry teacher Keith Gray a question about how to find the ratio of moles of iron to the ratio of moles of copper. Credit: Gillian Guerin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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