UPCOMING EVENT: A CAPPELLA NIGHT 2015 – Thursday, April 30th at 7:00 PM

A CAPPELLA NIGHT 2015 – Thursday, April 30th at 7:00 PM – MERHS Auditorium

The SoundWaves perform with and host: Boston University’s AFIX (with alumna Leanne Ciccone); Pingree’s Specttrum Highlights; Marblehead’s Jewel Tones; Marblehead’s Luminesence; and Hamilton-Wenham’s Kings of the Beach. 

 

Tickets go on sale Tuesday, April 28th.

PLEASE COME AND JOIN US!

$5.00 students, faculty and senior citizens; $8.00 general public.

Proceeds to benefit the MERHS Class of 2015.

 

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Fantasy Supreme Court prepares students for AP exam

Approaching the Advanced Placement exam, the AP United States Government class is participating in a fantasy Supreme Court league.

AP U.S. Government teacher Jennifer Coleman hopes that the fantasy league will help students grasp a better understanding of how the United States federal court system works.

“For AP test, we focus a lot on past Supreme Court cases, so I thought that paying close attention to the current court would help prepare the class,” she said.

Coleman stated that the present judicial system is changing precedents set by their former counterparts, making it an ideal time to study this branch of government.

“We have a Supreme Court right now that is making monumental decisions that could affect the rights of all U.S. citizens, especially students,” she said.

According to junior Tyler Quade, the league is educational, yet still fun.

“The league makes you do a lot of research. It is important to know all of the justices and their opinions or rulings on past cases,” he said.

Participants are expected to make accurate predictions for each justice of the Supreme Court, on whether he/she will overturn or uphold the decision made in a lower court.

The class has been predicting outcomes of a select few cases such as Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Abercrombie & Fitch.

According to Coleman, the winner of the league will receive bonus points on their next test. That being said, the league is not just restricted to students.

“Our league is specifically students in the class, but I also opened it up to any faculty who wanted to join. Anyone can participate in a league, ours is exclusive [to members of the class] though,” she said.

Junior Nathan Evans found that the idea has helped bring excitement to an otherwise bland topic.

“The fact that some extra points are at risk really helps get everyone involved. I have found that it encourages me to learn more about the Supreme Court of the United States,” he said.

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Middle school art class seeks inspiration from the high school art show

The annual high school art show is currently taking place in the hallways of MERHS. Art teacher Marion Powers brought her eighth grade class into the hallways to appreciate each class’s artwork and use it to create masterpieces of their own.

Decorating the main hallway of MERHS are artworks from the high school drawing, painting, ceramics, graphic design, digital photography, and printmaking classes. The art show is held every spring. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Decorating the main hallway of MERHS are artworks from the high school drawing, painting, ceramics, graphic design, digital photography, and printmaking classes. The art show is held every spring. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group of students from middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s eighth grade class looks at some of the artworks in the hallway. Powers asks her students to find a few pieces of artwork that speak to them. Once they return to her classroom, they create their own artworks inspired by the ones they chose. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group of students from middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s eighth grade class looks at some of the artworks in the hallway. Powers asks her students to find a few pieces of artwork that speak to them. Once they return to her classroom, they create their own artworks inspired by the ones they chose. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While they appreciate each class’s body of work from September to now, eighth grade students in middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s class take notes on what they see. Powers tells her class that “a lot of artists get ideas from other people and places,” and although they’re not copying it, “they’re turning it into their own work of art.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While they appreciate each class’s body of work from September to now, eighth grade students in middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s class take notes on what they see. Powers tells her class that “a lot of artists get ideas from other people and places,” and although they’re not copying it, “they’re turning it into their own work of art.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s eighth grade class works on their projects inspired by their chosen pieces from the high school art show. Later this year, Powers will have her high school class visit the middle school art show and ask them to create their own artworks inspired by what they see there. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s eighth grade class works on their projects inspired by their chosen pieces from the high school art show. Later this year, Powers will have her high school class visit the middle school art show and ask them to create their own artworks inspired by what they see there. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One of middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s eighth grade students was kind enough to show this reporter the artworks she chose for her project. This was the first one, and she chose it because she is interested in the abstract patterns that come together to make up the image of a concrete setting. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One of middle school art teacher Marion Powers’s eighth grade students was kind enough to show this reporter the artworks she chose for her project. This was the first one, and she chose it because she is interested in the abstract patterns that come together to make up the image of a concrete setting. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The second artwork the above-mentioned student used as an inspiration for her project. She appreciates the brilliant use of color and shape in this image, as well as the artist’s keen understanding of perspective. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The second artwork the above-mentioned student used as an inspiration for her project. She appreciates the brilliant use of color and shape in this image, as well as the artist’s keen understanding of perspective. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The student works on her masterpiece, using her two chosen pieces of artwork for inspiration. When asked why she gives her students this project, middle school art teacher Marion Power said, “I love seeing them use the work out there as an inspiration to create something new.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The student works on her masterpiece, using her two chosen pieces of artwork for inspiration. When asked why she gives her students this project, middle school art teacher Marion Power said, “I love seeing them use the work out there as an inspiration to create something new.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Bertucci’s Night raises money for Global Issues

The Global Issues class hosted a dinner at Bertucci’s Restaurant, in Beverly. It was a fundraiser for Malaria eradication. 15% of what was spent on dinner was donated to “Malaria No More”.

Sophomore Jack Colpoy’s and Wolf Hahn sit next to each other for dinner. To prevent Malaria, Malaria No More gathers money to buy nets. The nets go to children’s homes and hospitals for prevention of the disease. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jack Colpoy’s and Wolf Hahn sit next to each other for dinner. To prevent Malaria, Malaria No More gathers money to buy nets. The nets go to children’s homes and hospitals for prevention of the disease. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Wolf Hahn and Jack Garvey are enjoying their pizza! Malaria No More diagnosis children with this disease and treats it. The treatment costs 1 dollar and treats a child in 1 to 3 days.  Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Wolf Hahn and Jack Garvey are enjoying their pizza! Malaria No More diagnosis children with this disease and treats it. The treatment costs 1 dollar and treats a child in 1 to 3 days. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Right before the food came out; the boys passed plates around the table to get ready for pizza. Malaria is in the top 3 killers of children worldwide! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Right before the food came out; the boys passed plates around the table to get ready for pizza. Malaria is in the top 3 killers of children worldwide! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Most of the baseball team attended this fundraiser. The boys gathered around their table and waited patiently for their food to be served. The total cost of their meal was 375 dollars. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Most of the baseball team attended this fundraiser. The boys gathered around their table and waited patiently for their food to be served. The total cost of their meal was 375 dollars. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Robbie Sarmanian, Cosmo Pallazola, Mitch Paccone, with their 8th grade friend Ryan Garlitz got a ton of pizza’s. This was to support the “Malaria No More”. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Robbie Sarmanian, Cosmo Pallazola, Mitch Paccone, with their 8th grade friend Ryan Garlitz got a ton of pizza’s. This was to support the “Malaria No More”. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Seniors Brett Williams and Teddy Economo were sitting on the benches waiting for the rest of their team to be finished. For most of the night they were welcoming students from Manchester Essex into the restaurant. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Brett Williams and Teddy Economo were sitting on the benches waiting for the rest of their team to be finished. For most of the night they were welcoming students from Manchester Essex into the restaurant. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Ryan Garlitz went to dinner with his 9th grade friends. Scientists and organizations are currently in the process of creating a vaccine for Malaria to help stop it! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Ryan Garlitz went to dinner with his 9th grade friends. Scientists and organizations are currently in the process of creating a vaccine for Malaria to help stop it! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Every 60 seconds a child dies from Malaria. Junior Isabella Repucci looks at the Bertucci’s menu to see what she wants to buy as a contribution to this fundraiser. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Every 60 seconds a child dies from Malaria. Junior Isabella Repucci looks at the Bertucci’s menu to see what she wants to buy as a contribution to this fundraiser. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Green Team Builds Hydroponic and AquaPonics Project

Students in the Manchester Essex Green Team have created a simple yet effective environmentally friendly garden, out of the normal growing season. Their goal is to provide and create organic food for students. The definition of hydroponics is a subset of hydro culture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil.

The Green Teams students Belle Allmendinger, Justin Eichenburger, and Louis Masella created a healthy way to grow food. The aquaponics system combines aquaculture which is the farming of fish and hydroponics which is the raising of plants without soil. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Green Teams students Belle Allmendinger, Justin Eichenburger, and Louis Masella created a healthy way to grow food. The aquaponics system combines aquaculture which is the farming of fish and hydroponics which is the raising of plants without soil. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In some of the Aquaponic structures there are gold fish. Nutrients for the plants come from fish waste.  The plants act as a bio filter, and they clean the water making it a healthy living space for the fish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In some of the Aquaponic structures there are gold fish. Nutrients for the plants come from fish waste. The plants act as a bio filter, and they clean the water making it a healthy living space for the fish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
There are six aquaponic structures built on the third floor by the Green Team room. The students plan to build 10 of them with the help of their diagrams, blueprints and extensive research. Students have a budget which they must follow even though they plan to get the most out of each aquaponic. The total cost for 10 units is $1960. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
There are six aquaponic structures built on the third floor by the Green Team room. The students plan to build 10 of them with the help of their diagrams, blueprints and extensive research. Students have a budget which they must follow even though they plan to get the most out of each aquaponic. The total cost for 10 units is $1960. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
They types of plants that will grow in the aquaponics are selected by limitation of nutrients.  They plan on growing a small amount of Lettuce, basil, mint, chives and arugula due to it being their first time using and working with aquaponics. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
They types of plants that will grow in the aquaponics are selected by limitation of nutrients. They plan on growing a small amount of Lettuce, basil, mint, chives and arugula due to it being their first time using and working with aquaponics. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hydroponic towers provide an environmentally friendly option of growing food, in the winter time. Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and they are methods of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, with soil. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Hydroponic towers provide an environmentally friendly option of growing food, in the winter time. Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and they are methods of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, with soil. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students plan on constructing 30 towers, so far they have 10. The jug holds the pump and the tower, and water is then cycled through the tower moving from the pump, up the tubes and to the top. The water then drips down to have a constant flow of water hitting the Rockwool seeds. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students plan on constructing 30 towers, so far they have 10. The jug holds the pump and the tower, and water is then cycled through the tower moving from the pump, up the tubes and to the top. The water then drips down to have a constant flow of water hitting the Rockwool seeds. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Goldfish were the best option for the auqaponics because they are the easiest to take care of and can withstand the changing of conditions. Goldfish can survive in 40-80 degrees. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Goldfish were the best option for the auqaponics because they are the easiest to take care of and can withstand the changing of conditions. Goldfish can survive in 40-80 degrees. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Eighth grade history class creates Washington, D.C. projects

Every spring, the eighth grade class goes on a field trip to Washington, D.C. In preparation for this highly anticipated weeklong outing, students from James Thomas’s history class work in teams on PowerPoint projects, each group writing about a different one of our nation’s capital’s most iconic monuments and museums.

Students from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class work in the computer lab on their D.C. projects, which they have been developing since early March. Thomas organizes the D.C. trip, which will take place during the last week of May. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class work in the computer lab on their D.C. projects, which they have been developing since early March. Thomas organizes the D.C. trip, which will take place during the last week of May. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group’s reference materials are scattered across the desk of one of its members. Before each team starts their project, they decide on a monument or museum to write about. Next, the students create an outline with the main ideas of each slide, important facts and information, and a citation. Then, they find the best possible sources, both in print and online. Finally, after completing a voice-over, they assess their projects and submit them to eighth grade history teacher James Thomas. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group’s reference materials are scattered across the desk of one of its members. Before each team starts their project, they decide on a monument or museum to write about. Next, the students create an outline with the main ideas of each slide, important facts and information, and a citation. Then, they find the best possible sources, both in print and online. Finally, after completing a voice-over, they assess their projects and submit them to eighth grade history teacher James Thomas. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One student from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class uses Google Classroom to update the rest of her group on the status of their project. This education tool from the search engine juggernaut has been embraced by many middle school teachers and classes in the past year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One student from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class uses Google Classroom to update the rest of her group on the status of their project. This education tool from the search engine juggernaut has been embraced by many middle school teachers and classes in the past year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade history teacher James Thomas helps a group with their project.  Most projects focused monuments such as the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial, government buildings such as the U.S. Capitol and the White House, and museums such as the Smithsonian Institution, which includes (among many others) the National Museum of Air and Space, the National Museum of Natural History, and National Museum of American History. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade history teacher James Thomas helps a group with their project. Most projects focused monuments such as the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial, government buildings such as the U.S. Capitol and the White House, and museums such as the Smithsonian Institution, which includes (among many others) the National Museum of Air and Space, the National Museum of Natural History, and National Museum of American History. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Since the computer lab has only so many seats, a few groups work on their projects in the library. Occasionally, eighth grade history teacher James Thomas comes in to check their progress and help them work out any issues. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Since the computer lab has only so many seats, a few groups work on their projects in the library. Occasionally, eighth grade history teacher James Thomas comes in to check their progress and help them work out any issues. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two students in eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class work together on their project. After each group is finished, Thomas brings his class to the auditorium before the field trip and shows each project to the middle school.  Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two students in eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class work together on their project. After each group is finished, Thomas brings his class to the auditorium before the field trip and shows each project to the middle school. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two students in eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class work together on their project. After each group is finished, Thomas brings his class to the auditorium before the field trip and shows each project to the middle school.  Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One group from eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class volunteers to show the computer lab their almost-finished project in order to give classmates an idea of what their own projects should look like by this point. When asked why he uses the D.C. project in his classroom every year before the start of the trip, Thomas answered, “The purpose of the project is to make sure that students have some knowledge about what they’re seeing before they see it. It also gives them a very direct exposure to the things they should be learning about that are a part of our national heritage. And the other thing is I just think it’s fun. It provides a very different learning environment for them and for me as a teacher.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Bio Anthropology class gets claws

As an introduction to their unit on primates, students tried to accomplish fine motor tasks with fake claws attached to their fingers. One of the characteristics that all primates, including humans, have is having nails instead of claws, as well as sensitive tactile tissue at the ends of their digits. This allows primates to manipulate objects precisely.

Some of the tasks were to pick up dimes off a flat surface, tie knots in a string, thread a needle, and write a sentence with a short pencil. The students struggled with the tasks and were able to compared the experience to their usual “non-clawed” hands. Students were timed during the tasks with Devon Musgrave-Johnson as the winner of the “Claw Olympics”.

The students then learned about the rest of the characteristics, such as binocular stereoscopic vision and large brain to body size ratios. They then each picked groupings of primates to research for a class presentation.

 

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National Honor Society inducts new members and honor seniors

The National Honor Society accepted new members and gives senior members their golden cords for graduation. The senior officers for NHS also handed off their positions to the soon to be seniors.

Members and inductees of the National Honor Society (NHS) met at 7 o’clock at the school for the annual ceremony. Senior members were give graduation cords and inductees were introduced and given pins. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Members and inductees of the National Honor Society (NHS) met at 7 o’clock at the school for the annual ceremony. Senior members were give graduation cords and inductees were introduced and given pins. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Programs handed out before the ceremony bear the NHS pledge, as well inductee, member, and honorary member names. This year, 30 new members were inducted into the society. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Programs handed out before the ceremony bear the NHS pledge, as well inductee, member, and honorary member names. This year, 30 new members were inducted into the society. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Members, their families, and faculty meet in the auditorium and wait for the ceremony to begin. Presentations were given by NHS officers and a special guest speaker, Mary Rerisi. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Members, their families, and faculty meet in the auditorium and wait for the ceremony to begin. Presentations were given by NHS officers and a special guest speaker, Mary Rerisi. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Inductees listen to Rerisi speak as they sit in the front three rows of the auditorium. Currently, over one million in both the United States and Canada participate in NHS and its activities. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Inductees listen to Rerisi speak as they sit in the front three rows of the auditorium. Currently, over one million in both the United States and Canada participate in NHS and its activities. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior officer Julia Whitten explains the meaning of one of the four pillars that the society use to recognize outstanding high school students. The four pillars are excellence in areas of scholarship, leadership, service, and character. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior officer Julia Whitten explains the meaning of one of the four pillars that the society use to recognize outstanding high school students. The four pillars are excellence in areas of scholarship, leadership, service, and character. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Rerisi presents her interpretation and appreciation of the society through a speech and slide show. Rerisi described the members of the society as the ‘xmen’ of this generation who will rise above all others and provide great leadership in the future. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Rerisi presents her interpretation and appreciation of the society through a speech and slide show. Rerisi described the members of the society as the ‘xmen’ of this generation who will rise above all others and provide great leadership in the future. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Rerisi brings up a slide on the power point and explains how each act of community service done in the society creates a butterfly reaction. Through this butterfly reaction, the members of the society are able to reach more and more people and cause a grand reaction of kindness. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Rerisi brings up a slide on the power point and explains how each act of community service done in the society creates a butterfly reaction. Through this butterfly reaction, the members of the society are able to reach more and more people and cause a grand reaction of kindness. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior officers Tucker Evans, Jack Hay, Julia Whitten, Parker Malarkey, and Lucas Martz greet the audience and induct junior Connor Senay to the society. With each inductee, a comment from their teacher was read out loud explaining how they are exemplary students. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior officers Tucker Evans, Jack Hay, Julia Whitten, Parker Malarkey, and Lucas Martz greet the audience and induct junior Connor Senay to the society. With each inductee, a comment from their teacher was read out loud explaining how they are exemplary students. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
New members of the society read the pledge along with the current members as they receive the society’s official pin. The pledge states that all members will uphold their loyalty to the school and will be true to the principles the society stands for. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
New members of the society read the pledge along with the current members as they receive the society’s official pin. The pledge states that all members will uphold their loyalty to the school and will be true to the principles the society stands for. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Honorary member Maria Burgess along with the new officers presents golden cords to the seniors. During graduation, National Honor Society members can be distinguished by the golden cords they wear over their gown. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Honorary member Maria Burgess along with the new officers presents golden cords to the seniors. During graduation, National Honor Society members can be distinguished by the golden cords they wear over their gown. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

After the induction ceremony, members of the National Honor Society enjoy the refreshments provided by the juniors. Seniors rejoiced during this time as they realize they have almost completed their final year of high school. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the induction ceremony, members of the National Honor Society enjoy the refreshments provided by the juniors. Seniors rejoiced during this time as they realize they have almost completed their final year of high school. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Ceramics class differentiates projects

The objectives in ceramics class are different every day because 2 levels are taught at once. Different things have to be done to complete the ceramics process. All students work at their own pace and use different tools to finish their pieces.

Junior Paige Lafferty is making a pot and smoothening out the sides of it. This process is to attach the base and sides of the pot, as well as smoothening it. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Paige Lafferty is making a pot and smoothening out the sides of it. This process is to attach the base and sides of the pot, as well as smoothening it. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Cassandra Gonser is using a fettling knife to cut into her block she is making. This tool is not the easiest tool to use to cut through clay, the exacto knife is. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Cassandra Gonser is using a fettling knife to cut into her block she is making. This tool is not the easiest tool to use to cut through clay, the exacto knife is. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students used slabs to create a box. They stick it under a roller to then create an even piece of clay. When putting together the sides of the box, the artist needs to score and, use magic water, and that will form a corner. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students used slabs to create a box. They stick it under a roller to then create an even piece of clay. When putting together the sides of the box, the artist needs to score and, use magic water, and that will form a corner. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Ethan Andersen is doing a critique. All students do this every Friday to give other classmates some critical advice on their artwork. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Ethan Andersen is doing a critique. All students do this every Friday to give other classmates some critical advice on their artwork. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In ceramics some sculptures can either have texture, or be simple. This box is simple, but its minimalism is aesthetically pleasing. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In ceramics some sculptures can either have texture, or be simple. This box is simple, but its minimalism is aesthetically pleasing. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Caisi Calandra is using a rib to smoothen the base of her clay. The tool mainly removes any bumps that your clay could have. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Caisi Calandra is using a rib to smoothen the base of her clay. The tool mainly removes any bumps that your clay could have. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Madelyn Mulry is working on her piece. In ceramics, when clay is leather hard, tools are used to shave the bottom to smoothen your piece and make a foot. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Madelyn Mulry is working on her piece. In ceramics, when clay is leather hard, tools are used to shave the bottom to smoothen your piece and make a foot. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Mariah Litka has her work critiqued. When the class critiques they make judgments on artwork as well. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Mariah Litka has her work critiqued. When the class critiques they make judgments on artwork as well. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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