Bertucci’s Night raises money for Global Issues

The Global Issues class hosted a dinner at Bertucci’s Restaurant, in Beverly. It was a fundraiser for Malaria eradication. 15% of what was spent on dinner was donated to “Malaria No More”.

Sophomore Jack Colpoy’s and Wolf Hahn sit next to each other for dinner. To prevent Malaria, Malaria No More gathers money to buy nets. The nets go to children’s homes and hospitals for prevention of the disease. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jack Colpoy’s and Wolf Hahn sit next to each other for dinner. To prevent Malaria, Malaria No More gathers money to buy nets. The nets go to children’s homes and hospitals for prevention of the disease. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Wolf Hahn and Jack Garvey are enjoying their pizza! Malaria No More diagnosis children with this disease and treats it. The treatment costs 1 dollar and treats a child in 1 to 3 days.  Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Wolf Hahn and Jack Garvey are enjoying their pizza! Malaria No More diagnosis children with this disease and treats it. The treatment costs 1 dollar and treats a child in 1 to 3 days. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Right before the food came out; the boys passed plates around the table to get ready for pizza. Malaria is in the top 3 killers of children worldwide! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Right before the food came out; the boys passed plates around the table to get ready for pizza. Malaria is in the top 3 killers of children worldwide! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Most of the baseball team attended this fundraiser. The boys gathered around their table and waited patiently for their food to be served. The total cost of their meal was 375 dollars. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Most of the baseball team attended this fundraiser. The boys gathered around their table and waited patiently for their food to be served. The total cost of their meal was 375 dollars. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Robbie Sarmanian, Cosmo Pallazola, Mitch Paccone, with their 8th grade friend Ryan Garlitz got a ton of pizza’s. This was to support the “Malaria No More”. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Robbie Sarmanian, Cosmo Pallazola, Mitch Paccone, with their 8th grade friend Ryan Garlitz got a ton of pizza’s. This was to support the “Malaria No More”. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Seniors Brett Williams and Teddy Economo were sitting on the benches waiting for the rest of their team to be finished. For most of the night they were welcoming students from Manchester Essex into the restaurant. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Brett Williams and Teddy Economo were sitting on the benches waiting for the rest of their team to be finished. For most of the night they were welcoming students from Manchester Essex into the restaurant. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Ryan Garlitz went to dinner with his 9th grade friends. Scientists and organizations are currently in the process of creating a vaccine for Malaria to help stop it! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Ryan Garlitz went to dinner with his 9th grade friends. Scientists and organizations are currently in the process of creating a vaccine for Malaria to help stop it! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Every 60 seconds a child dies from Malaria. Junior Isabella Repucci looks at the Bertucci’s menu to see what she wants to buy as a contribution to this fundraiser. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Every 60 seconds a child dies from Malaria. Junior Isabella Repucci looks at the Bertucci’s menu to see what she wants to buy as a contribution to this fundraiser. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Global Issues Raises Money with a Penny War

The Global Issues class, taught by history teacher James Wallimann, chose to fight malaria this year and host a Penny War fundraiser to raise money for their cause. In Penny Wars, each coin is worth a certain amount of points, depending on the type of coin, and each dollar subtracts 100 points from that grade’s jug. At the end of the month, the class with the largest amount of points wins an ice cream social.

 

 

Seniors Teddy Economo and Craig Carter work the Penny Wars stand and oversee the placement of coins. Students from the Global Issues class run numerous fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for their cause. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Teddy Economo and Craig Carter work the Penny Wars stand and oversee the placement of coins. Students from the Global Issues class run numerous fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for their cause. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Grades 6 through 12, as well as the faculty, have marked jugs in which to place their coins. This year, the students are raising money for Malaria No More, a non-profit foundation dedicated to diminishing and eventually eliminating deaths due to Malaria. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Grades 6 through 12, as well as the faculty, have marked jugs in which to place their coins. This year, the students are raising money for Malaria No More, a non-profit foundation dedicated to diminishing and eventually eliminating deaths due to Malaria. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students can place coins in their jugs to gain points for their class; however they may also place bills into other class’s jugs to subtract a certain amount of points. The money will help prevent deaths due to Malaria, which is one of the top three killers of children worldwide. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students can place coins in their jugs to gain points for their class; however they may also place bills into other class’s jugs to subtract a certain amount of points. The money will help prevent deaths due to Malaria, which is one of the top three killers of children worldwide. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Samantha Woodman places a coin into her class bucket. This year, the seniors amassed the largest amount of coin across the entire school and won an ice cream social for their entire class. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Senior Samantha Woodman places a coin into her class bucket. This year, the seniors amassed the largest amount of coin across the entire school and won an ice cream social for their entire class. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Every 60 seconds, a child dies from Malaria, a completely preventable and curable disease. From Penny Wars alone, students raised slightly over 800 dollars for the cause. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Every 60 seconds, a child dies from Malaria, a completely preventable and curable disease. From Penny Wars alone, students raised slightly over 800 dollars for the cause. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

 

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Global Issues Class Informs Students about Malaria

On Wednesday November 5th, Global Issues teacher James Wallimann and some of his students provided a presentation to educate the high school on this year’s topic of Malaria. Each year in the students in Global Issues choose a worldwide dilemma to provide a donation to. The money for the donation will come from a series of fundraisers and events run by the class over the course of the year.

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At the beginning of the presentation, senior Steven Ascolillo asked a volunteer in the audience to start a stopwatch to see how long the presentation would take. Once the PowerPoint was finished, the final time was translated into how many people had died from malaria because a person dies every minute from malaria. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Senior Marissa Tiberii shows a map of how high the risk of malaria is throughout the world. The highest concentration of malaria is located in the dark red areas like Africa and South east Asia, while the risk is much lower in the gray areas like the United States and Russia. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Outside of the auditorium, there is a bulletin board of the upcoming events the global issues class is hosting to raise money to give to the Malaria No More fund. Malaria No More has a subgroup called Power of One in which one dollar is equal to one treatment that saves one life. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Ascolillo shares some of the treatments and prevention actions people in places like Africa can take for a small amount of money. For people suffering from malaria in these places, there is medication offered but so many people cannot afford the trip to the doctors. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Along with treatment, there are many inexpensive routes to take in preventing malaria. The most popular is the mosquito net which can help prevent malaria for up to five years and can protect from mosquito bites while sleeping. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Several history classes intently listen to junior Chelsea Rose as she explains the actions other people from around the world have taken. Private companies have donated money to the cause of malaria along with many student bodies around the globe. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Stop Hunger Now Fundraiser hosted at Cape Ann Lanes

Seniors Alyssa Reeves and Paige Zaval host bowling night for their SCORE project. SCORE stands for “Senior Choice of Related Experience”, and during the last academic quarter, seniors complete a project of their choice, allowing them to explore a career that they may want to pursue in the future. Zaval and Reeves completed their SCORE project through fundraising for Global Issues class at Cape Ann Lanes.

Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students contribute to Stop Hunger Now by bowling at Cape Ann Lanes. For fifteen dollars, people could bowl for three games from 6-9. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students contribute to Stop Hunger Now by bowling at Cape Ann Lanes. For fifteen dollars, people could bowl for three games from 6-9. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Breanna Arnold, Bailey Graves, and Meghan Conway compete against each other in a lane. Cape Ann Lanes uses candlepin style bowling at their lanes, which originates from Worcester, Massachusetts. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Breanna Arnold, Bailey Graves, and Meghan Conway compete against each other in a lane. Cape Ann Lanes uses candlepin style bowling at their lanes, which originates from Worcester, Massachusetts. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Maddie Dahlin and Fiona Davis purchase tickets from Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves. Additional donations were also made for Stop Hunger Now as well as the proceeds from the bowling rounds. Credit:  Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Maddie Dahlin and Fiona Davis purchase tickets from Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves. Additional donations were also made for Stop Hunger Now as well as the proceeds from the bowling rounds. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bailey Graves enters names for the round on the keyboard. In Candlepin style bowling, there are ten rounds in each game, which is often called a “string”. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bailey Graves enters names for the round on the keyboard. In Candlepin style bowling, there are ten rounds in each game, which is often called a “string”. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Isabella Hickey begins to approach the foul line for the second round of the game. The three step approach is the most common technique for candlepin style bowling, and the less shifting weight from each foot makes the delivery more productive. Credit:  Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Isabella Hickey begins to approach the foul line for the second round of the game. The three step approach is the most common technique for candlepin style bowling, and the less shifting weight from each foot makes the delivery more productive. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves sell tickets at the table during the fundraiser. The goal of 260 dollars was reached and exceeded by about forty dollars. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves sell tickets at the table during the fundraiser. The goal of 260 dollars was reached and exceeded by about forty dollars. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Global Issues class hosts Teacher Talent Show

teacher talent show 1As one of their last  major fund raisers for the school year, the Global Issues class held their annual Teacher Talent Show on March 14.

Although the event was not as successful at raising money as it was the year before,  the Teacher Talent show managed to bring in $2,000 for the Stop Hunger Now, campaign according to Global Issues teacher James Walliman.

“Although we were a bit disappointed with the turn-out this year, we still had a really fun time and raised money for an incredible cause,” Walliman said.

The show was run by Walliman’s E block Global Issues class.  Every student in the class was assigned a job ranging from backstage work to publicizing the event.

Hosted by seniors Chris Dente and Liam Logue, the show began with a demonstration of how the meal packs that will be purchased from the night’s donations are put together.

Spanish teacher Robert Bilsbury and his wife Kate Bilsbury, accompanied by sophomore Tyler Quade on the viola, were the first act of the night. They performed the songs “Falling Slowly” by Glen Hasard and “Kathy’s Song” by Simon and Garfunkel.

The social studies department then entertained crowds by playing a game of charades on stage. The team “On Wednesdays We Wear Pink,” consisting of social studies teachers Alison Wright, Jennifer Coleman, and math teacher Sarah Deluca won the game and then celebrated with confetti.

This act was followed by a rendition of “The Element Song” by Physics teacher Philip Logsdon. Then physical education teacher Thomas Durfee performed a self-written rap chronicling the entire Star Wars series.

The English department provided a surprising twist to the evening by showcasing a video parody of TV show “Breaking Bad” called “Breaking Badly.” In a spoof on the original series, teacher Dan Koughan portrayed a teacher selling lines of poetry on the streets.

“I thought all of the teachers did a good job of bringing their own personality to the stage. It was definitely a fun night,” junior Alicia Setzer said.

The night ended with a performance by Walliman, Bilsbury, and math teacher David Alger that eventually brought all Global Issues students who worked on the project to the stage for a round of applause.

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Memorial Elementary Hosts Empty Bowl Dinner

On Thursday March 6th, the Manchester Memorial Elementary School hosted a soup dinner and donated all the money to MERHS’s Global Issues class to provide meals for those in need.

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Students Raise Money with Flowers

For two weeks, a few students from the Global Issues class sold carnations that would be handed out on Valentine’s Day. The event made a total of $150 dollars which is equivalent to 600 meal packages at this year’s chosen NGO, Stop Hunger Now.

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Global Issues Update

Global Issues Picture  As many students may know thanks to the announcements and flyers around the school, the Global Issues class is working to end world hunger with the organization Stop Hunger Now.

“We have hunger in our country and kind of in our area, so it’s something we can understand and it’s also something you can emphasize with because we can do every single day, and if we didn’t have food or resources, we can easily understand how difficult that would be,” Global Issues teacher James Wallimann said.

“I like the stop hunger now organization because not only can we give money to help these starving people but we can package the meals itself,” senior and Global Issues class-member Molly McCoy said.

In order to raise the desired goal of $10,000, the Global Issues class has planned different events and activities for staff and students to participate in.

Coming to an end February 14 is the Penny Wars, Wallimann said, “Grades six through 12 including the faculty [are] competing together to raise the most amount of money, and that’s for a month long, the winning class gets an ice-cream party.”

In February, the Global Issues will also be selling carnation flowers during the week of Valentine’s Day.

“We also have the teacher talent show coming up March 14, which last year raised almost $4,000,” Wallimann said. “An event I’m really excited for is the teacher talent. It’s really funny to watch your teachers be silly,” McCoy said.

A restaurant night is coming up also, sometime in February with Cape Ann Pizza

There will also be a packaging day in April where students will be able to package the meals themselves for the Stop Hunger Now organization.

“Right now we have $2,000, so we still have $8,000 to go, our goal is $10,000,” Wallimann said, “I feel with the Penny Wars, the teacher talent show, and a couple other things we will be able to reach our goal.”

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Global Issues Class Prepares for Upcoming Fundraisers

On Wednesday, January 29th, the Global Issues class returned from Mid Term Examinations by working on the Gardner Project.

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