Bertucci’s Night raises money for Global Issues

The Global Issues class hosted a dinner at Bertucci’s Restaurant, in Beverly. It was a fundraiser for Malaria eradication. 15% of what was spent on dinner was donated to “Malaria No More”.

Sophomore Jack Colpoy’s and Wolf Hahn sit next to each other for dinner. To prevent Malaria, Malaria No More gathers money to buy nets. The nets go to children’s homes and hospitals for prevention of the disease. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jack Colpoy’s and Wolf Hahn sit next to each other for dinner. To prevent Malaria, Malaria No More gathers money to buy nets. The nets go to children’s homes and hospitals for prevention of the disease. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Wolf Hahn and Jack Garvey are enjoying their pizza! Malaria No More diagnosis children with this disease and treats it. The treatment costs 1 dollar and treats a child in 1 to 3 days.  Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Wolf Hahn and Jack Garvey are enjoying their pizza! Malaria No More diagnosis children with this disease and treats it. The treatment costs 1 dollar and treats a child in 1 to 3 days. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Right before the food came out; the boys passed plates around the table to get ready for pizza. Malaria is in the top 3 killers of children worldwide! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Right before the food came out; the boys passed plates around the table to get ready for pizza. Malaria is in the top 3 killers of children worldwide! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Most of the baseball team attended this fundraiser. The boys gathered around their table and waited patiently for their food to be served. The total cost of their meal was 375 dollars. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Most of the baseball team attended this fundraiser. The boys gathered around their table and waited patiently for their food to be served. The total cost of their meal was 375 dollars. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Robbie Sarmanian, Cosmo Pallazola, Mitch Paccone, with their 8th grade friend Ryan Garlitz got a ton of pizza’s. This was to support the “Malaria No More”. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Robbie Sarmanian, Cosmo Pallazola, Mitch Paccone, with their 8th grade friend Ryan Garlitz got a ton of pizza’s. This was to support the “Malaria No More”. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Seniors Brett Williams and Teddy Economo were sitting on the benches waiting for the rest of their team to be finished. For most of the night they were welcoming students from Manchester Essex into the restaurant. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Brett Williams and Teddy Economo were sitting on the benches waiting for the rest of their team to be finished. For most of the night they were welcoming students from Manchester Essex into the restaurant. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Ryan Garlitz went to dinner with his 9th grade friends. Scientists and organizations are currently in the process of creating a vaccine for Malaria to help stop it! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grader Ryan Garlitz went to dinner with his 9th grade friends. Scientists and organizations are currently in the process of creating a vaccine for Malaria to help stop it! Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Every 60 seconds a child dies from Malaria. Junior Isabella Repucci looks at the Bertucci’s menu to see what she wants to buy as a contribution to this fundraiser. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Every 60 seconds a child dies from Malaria. Junior Isabella Repucci looks at the Bertucci’s menu to see what she wants to buy as a contribution to this fundraiser. Credit: Allie Sarmanian for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Eighth grade history class creates Washington, D.C. projects

Every spring, the eighth grade class goes on a field trip to Washington, D.C. In preparation for this highly anticipated weeklong outing, students from James Thomas’s history class work in teams on PowerPoint projects, each group writing about a different one of our nation’s capital’s most iconic monuments and museums.

Students from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class work in the computer lab on their D.C. projects, which they have been developing since early March. Thomas organizes the D.C. trip, which will take place during the last week of May. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class work in the computer lab on their D.C. projects, which they have been developing since early March. Thomas organizes the D.C. trip, which will take place during the last week of May. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group’s reference materials are scattered across the desk of one of its members. Before each team starts their project, they decide on a monument or museum to write about. Next, the students create an outline with the main ideas of each slide, important facts and information, and a citation. Then, they find the best possible sources, both in print and online. Finally, after completing a voice-over, they assess their projects and submit them to eighth grade history teacher James Thomas. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group’s reference materials are scattered across the desk of one of its members. Before each team starts their project, they decide on a monument or museum to write about. Next, the students create an outline with the main ideas of each slide, important facts and information, and a citation. Then, they find the best possible sources, both in print and online. Finally, after completing a voice-over, they assess their projects and submit them to eighth grade history teacher James Thomas. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One student from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class uses Google Classroom to update the rest of her group on the status of their project. This education tool from the search engine juggernaut has been embraced by many middle school teachers and classes in the past year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One student from James Thomas’s eighth grade history class uses Google Classroom to update the rest of her group on the status of their project. This education tool from the search engine juggernaut has been embraced by many middle school teachers and classes in the past year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade history teacher James Thomas helps a group with their project.  Most projects focused monuments such as the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial, government buildings such as the U.S. Capitol and the White House, and museums such as the Smithsonian Institution, which includes (among many others) the National Museum of Air and Space, the National Museum of Natural History, and National Museum of American History. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Eighth grade history teacher James Thomas helps a group with their project. Most projects focused monuments such as the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial, government buildings such as the U.S. Capitol and the White House, and museums such as the Smithsonian Institution, which includes (among many others) the National Museum of Air and Space, the National Museum of Natural History, and National Museum of American History. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Since the computer lab has only so many seats, a few groups work on their projects in the library. Occasionally, eighth grade history teacher James Thomas comes in to check their progress and help them work out any issues. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Since the computer lab has only so many seats, a few groups work on their projects in the library. Occasionally, eighth grade history teacher James Thomas comes in to check their progress and help them work out any issues. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two students in eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class work together on their project. After each group is finished, Thomas brings his class to the auditorium before the field trip and shows each project to the middle school.  Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two students in eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class work together on their project. After each group is finished, Thomas brings his class to the auditorium before the field trip and shows each project to the middle school. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two students in eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class work together on their project. After each group is finished, Thomas brings his class to the auditorium before the field trip and shows each project to the middle school.  Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
One group from eighth grade history teacher James Thomas’s class volunteers to show the computer lab their almost-finished project in order to give classmates an idea of what their own projects should look like by this point. When asked why he uses the D.C. project in his classroom every year before the start of the trip, Thomas answered, “The purpose of the project is to make sure that students have some knowledge about what they’re seeing before they see it. It also gives them a very direct exposure to the things they should be learning about that are a part of our national heritage. And the other thing is I just think it’s fun. It provides a very different learning environment for them and for me as a teacher.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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AP Psychology Class Presents Development Projects

History and AP Psychology teacher Jessica Tran assigns her students to create a presentation on their psychological development as they grew up. The students applied the terms and theories they had learned in class to past events in their lives and presented their findings to the class.

Senior Marissa Tiberii presents her scrap book containing photos of her growing up psychologically and physically. This psychology project not only tests the students on their understanding of psychological theories of development, but also allows everyone in the class to learn about how their peers matured. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Marissa Tiberii presents her scrap book containing photos of her growing up psychologically and physically. This psychology project not only tests the students on their understanding of psychological theories of development, but also allows everyone in the class to learn about how their peers matured. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Hannah Thorne shows her fellow seniors, Alex Rice and Leo Gallo, her artistic book of psychological development. The students were able to choose a form of presentation such as slideshows, scrapbooks, or posters. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Hannah Thorne shows her fellow seniors, Alex Rice and Leo Gallo, her artistic book of psychological development. The students were able to choose a form of presentation such as slideshows, scrapbooks, or posters. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Julia Whitten proudly displays her mini photo album she created titled, “I always look slightly annoyed in photographs”. The photo album contained pictures from her childhood along with funny stories that showed her developing over the years psychologically and physically. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Julia Whitten proudly displays her mini photo album she created titled, “I always look slightly annoyed in photographs”. The photo album contained pictures from her childhood along with funny stories that showed her developing over the years psychologically and physically. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Whitten shows herself napping in the car as a child while connecting it to Piaget’s preoperational stage of development. Throughout the class a large amount of students chose pictures from their past to represent the different stages of development. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Whitten shows herself napping in the car as a child while connecting it to Piaget’s preoperational stage of development. Throughout the class a large amount of students chose pictures from their past to represent the different stages of development. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Sam Koufman offers explanations for the childhood pictures he has chosen for his project. Students were asked to epitomize the psychological ideas of development, moral reasoning, and psychosocial stages in a creative manner of their choosing. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Sam Koufman offers explanations for the childhood pictures he has chosen for his project. Students were asked to epitomize the psychological ideas of development, moral reasoning, and psychosocial stages in a creative manner of their choosing. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Koufman proudly displays his project titled “Sam Through the Ages.” To present to their fellow classmates, students sat at tables of four and carried on a round table discussion regarding their findings on their own development. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Koufman proudly displays his project titled “Sam Through the Ages.” To present to their fellow classmates, students sat at tables of four and carried on a round table discussion regarding their findings on their own development. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students lay their projects out for public viewing. Senior Hayley Malloy chose to create and illustrate a story about a character named AJ in order to best explain the psychological theories of Jean Piaget, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Erik Erikson.  Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students lay their projects out for public viewing. Senior Hayley Malloy chose to create and illustrate a story about a character named AJ in order to best explain the psychological theories of Jean Piaget, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Erik Erikson. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Global Issues Raises Money with a Penny War

The Global Issues class, taught by history teacher James Wallimann, chose to fight malaria this year and host a Penny War fundraiser to raise money for their cause. In Penny Wars, each coin is worth a certain amount of points, depending on the type of coin, and each dollar subtracts 100 points from that grade’s jug. At the end of the month, the class with the largest amount of points wins an ice cream social.

 

 

Seniors Teddy Economo and Craig Carter work the Penny Wars stand and oversee the placement of coins. Students from the Global Issues class run numerous fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for their cause. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Teddy Economo and Craig Carter work the Penny Wars stand and oversee the placement of coins. Students from the Global Issues class run numerous fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for their cause. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Grades 6 through 12, as well as the faculty, have marked jugs in which to place their coins. This year, the students are raising money for Malaria No More, a non-profit foundation dedicated to diminishing and eventually eliminating deaths due to Malaria. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Grades 6 through 12, as well as the faculty, have marked jugs in which to place their coins. This year, the students are raising money for Malaria No More, a non-profit foundation dedicated to diminishing and eventually eliminating deaths due to Malaria. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students can place coins in their jugs to gain points for their class; however they may also place bills into other class’s jugs to subtract a certain amount of points. The money will help prevent deaths due to Malaria, which is one of the top three killers of children worldwide. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students can place coins in their jugs to gain points for their class; however they may also place bills into other class’s jugs to subtract a certain amount of points. The money will help prevent deaths due to Malaria, which is one of the top three killers of children worldwide. Credit: Hayley Malloy for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Samantha Woodman places a coin into her class bucket. This year, the seniors amassed the largest amount of coin across the entire school and won an ice cream social for their entire class. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Senior Samantha Woodman places a coin into her class bucket. This year, the seniors amassed the largest amount of coin across the entire school and won an ice cream social for their entire class. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Every 60 seconds, a child dies from Malaria, a completely preventable and curable disease. From Penny Wars alone, students raised slightly over 800 dollars for the cause. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Every 60 seconds, a child dies from Malaria, a completely preventable and curable disease. From Penny Wars alone, students raised slightly over 800 dollars for the cause. Credit: Avery St. Sauveur for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

 

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Debaters achieve perfect records, win two events

Twelve debaters competing in Public Forum, Lincoln Douglas and Novice Lincoln Douglas represented Manchester Essex at the Little Lexington Tournament at Lexington High School.

The tournament took place on Nov. 23 and hosted hundreds of students from across the region.

In the Public Forum event, which consists of two partner teams debating a current events related topic, juniors Charlie Davis and Jenny Cochand and junior Oscar Heanue and senior Hannah Riordan had perfect records of five wins and zero losses.

“I was very happy with how Jenny and I performed at the tournament. It was the highest I had ever placed at a local tournament, and I had never made it to a final round before, so it was a great experience to debate against a lot of competition and achieve success,” Davis said.

Davis and Cochand made it to the final round in Public Forum, coming in second in the pool. Riordan and Heanue earned third place in the pool. Cochand also received a speaker award.

Debate team members Emmett Strack and Connor Senay, both juniors, also competed in Public Forum with a record of two wins and three losses.

“The public forum pool had some great competition. It was fun to compete against such strong teams,” Strack said.

In the Lincoln Douglas event, senior Nick Albertazzi won his division and received a speaker award as well.

“Although there were only a number of debaters in the LD pool, the kids were really competitive which just made for a good tournament,” Albertazzi said.

Freshmen Kevin Albertazzi and Will Cole and junior Joe Alibali competed in Novice LD. Albertazzi ended the tournament in seventh place in his event.

“I was really proud of the whole team since we were at the top of two divisions and took home multiple awards for Manchester Essex,” Cochand said.

With the holidays spanning a few weekends in December, the debate season slows down briefly.

“I was glad to get some of my points early in the quarter because December doesn’t have a lot of tournaments, and January is a tough month to compete because of midterms,” debate judge senior Meghan Conway said.

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Global Issues Class Informs Students about Malaria

On Wednesday November 5th, Global Issues teacher James Wallimann and some of his students provided a presentation to educate the high school on this year’s topic of Malaria. Each year in the students in Global Issues choose a worldwide dilemma to provide a donation to. The money for the donation will come from a series of fundraisers and events run by the class over the course of the year.

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At the beginning of the presentation, senior Steven Ascolillo asked a volunteer in the audience to start a stopwatch to see how long the presentation would take. Once the PowerPoint was finished, the final time was translated into how many people had died from malaria because a person dies every minute from malaria. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Senior Marissa Tiberii shows a map of how high the risk of malaria is throughout the world. The highest concentration of malaria is located in the dark red areas like Africa and South east Asia, while the risk is much lower in the gray areas like the United States and Russia. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Outside of the auditorium, there is a bulletin board of the upcoming events the global issues class is hosting to raise money to give to the Malaria No More fund. Malaria No More has a subgroup called Power of One in which one dollar is equal to one treatment that saves one life. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Ascolillo shares some of the treatments and prevention actions people in places like Africa can take for a small amount of money. For people suffering from malaria in these places, there is medication offered but so many people cannot afford the trip to the doctors. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Along with treatment, there are many inexpensive routes to take in preventing malaria. The most popular is the mosquito net which can help prevent malaria for up to five years and can protect from mosquito bites while sleeping. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Several history classes intently listen to junior Chelsea Rose as she explains the actions other people from around the world have taken. Private companies have donated money to the cause of malaria along with many student bodies around the globe. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Coleman shows colonial clothing

US History teacher Jennifer Coleman teaches her class about her summer job: a park ranger who discusses the American Revolution to people who attend her park’s demonstrations.  Coleman shows her classes the full colonial dress that she wears as a park ranger.

Coleman holds the piece of clothing that she wears underneath her outfit.  Colonial women generally wore homespun linen because they did not have access to cotton from India.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman holds the piece of clothing that she wears underneath her outfit. Colonial women generally wore homespun linen because they did not have access to cotton from India. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Sasha Ball helps Coleman tie up her stay.  A stay is like a corset, but it encourages good posture more than it tightens the waist.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Sasha Ball helps Coleman tie up her stay. A stay is like a corset, but it encourages good posture more than it tightens the waist. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman ties the pockets of her outfit onto the sides of the mannequin.  Since colonial dresses did not have pockets, these were how colonial women carried their possessions.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman ties the pockets of her outfit onto the sides of the mannequin. Since colonial dresses did not have pockets, these were how colonial women carried their possessions. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman puts on the long skirt of the outfit.  During her American Revolution presentation at the park, Coleman talks about the minutemen, then performs a musket shooting demonstration.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman puts on the long skirt of the outfit. During her American Revolution presentation at the park, Coleman talks about the minutemen, then performs a musket shooting demonstration. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman pins on the front of the dress.  Since it was difficult for colonial women to get pins, they would have their husbands get them when they went to trade.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman pins on the front of the dress. Since it was difficult for colonial women to get pins, they would have their husbands get them when they went to trade. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman shows the class her shoes that she wears with her colonial outfit.  Because the colonists walked on uneven and rough roads, their shoes had no treads; treads are necessary for smooth floors, which were generally not implemented.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman shows the class her shoes that she wears with her colonial outfit. Because the colonists walked on uneven and rough roads, their shoes had no treads; treads are necessary for smooth floors, which were generally not implemented. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman informs the class about alternative methods for wearing clothing.  For example, there was no elastic in socks in the colonies, so they had to hold their socks up with garters.   Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman informs the class about alternative methods for wearing clothing. For example, there was no elastic in socks in the colonies, so they had to hold their socks up with garters. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Coleman finishes dressing the mannequin and puts it off to the side.  It takes Coleman a minimum of twelve minutes to put on her entire outfit.   Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Coleman finishes dressing the mannequin and puts it off to the side. It takes Coleman a minimum of twelve minutes to put on her entire outfit. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Parents learn about classes at the high school

Parents follow their children’s schedules to go over the syllabi of each class with teachers.  Parent Night is an annual event held each September, and is a way for parents to meet teachers.
Seniors Lila Etter, Bailey Graves, and Louisa Spofford hand out schedules to parents that show them where they should go to meet their children’s teachers.  The parents visited their children’s teachers for ten minutes each to go over what the students will be doing in the class this year.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Lila Etter, Bailey Graves, and Louisa Spofford hand out schedules to parents that show them where they should go to meet their children’s teachers. The parents visited their children’s teachers for ten minutes each to go over what the students will be doing in the class this year. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Joshua Ward represents the SoundWaves, an A Cappella group run by chorus teacher Donna O’Neill.  The SoundWaves perform at every major Manchester Essex Regional High School concert.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Joshua Ward represents the SoundWaves, an A Cappella group run by chorus teacher Donna O’Neill. The SoundWaves perform at every major Manchester Essex Regional High School concert. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior William Kannengieser and senior Charles Brennan provide information to parents about the high school’s DECA program.  DECA is a business and marketing program, and they participate in regional and national competitions.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior William Kannengieser and senior Charles Brennan provide information to parents about the high school’s DECA program. DECA is a business and marketing program, and they participate in regional and national competitions. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Tucker Evans and Junior Sara Rhuda play piano in the auditorium for the parents as they walk in.  Evans and Rhuda are both members of the high school chorus and the SoundWaves, so they perform at occasions similar to parent night as well.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Tucker Evans and Junior Sara Rhuda play piano in the auditorium for the parents as they walk in. Evans and Rhuda are both members of the high school chorus and the SoundWaves, so they perform at occasions similar to parent night as well. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
History teacher Jennifer Coleman displays her website to parents.  Coleman explains that she puts not only homework assignments on her website, but also resources to further help students understand historical events.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
History teacher Jennifer Coleman displays her website to parents. Coleman explains that she puts not only homework assignments on her website, but also resources to further help students understand historical events. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Foreign Language teacher Erin Fortunato goes over the plan for her French III Honors class to the parents of her students.  Fortunato describes the course topics as well as the expectations that she has of her students’ work.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Foreign Language teacher Erin Fortunato goes over the plan for her French III Honors class to the parents of her students. Fortunato describes the course topics as well as the expectations that she has of her students’ work. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Allison Krause gives a description of her class to parents.  Krause has taught at Manchester Essex Regional High School for nine years, and she went to Manchester High School as a student.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Allison Krause gives a description of her class to parents. Krause has taught at Manchester Essex Regional High School for nine years, and she went to Manchester High School as a student. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Liz Edgerton explains her plans for one of her classes to parents.  Along with being an English teacher, Edgerton is also the head of the high school drama club. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Liz Edgerton explains her plans for one of her classes to parents. Along with being an English teacher, Edgerton is also the head of the high school drama club. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Maria Burgess meets the parents of some of her biology students.  Burgess teaches not only biology, but also anatomy and physiology and Authentic Science Research.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Maria Burgess meets the parents of some of her biology students. Burgess teaches not only biology, but also anatomy and physiology and Authentic Science Research. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

DECA teacher Dean Martino explains the values and work ethic that he expects in his DECA students.  DECA has won various business and marketing competitions regionally and nationally.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
DECA teacher Dean Martino explains the values and work ethic that he expects in his DECA students. DECA has won various business and marketing competitions regionally and nationally. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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New Science and History Electives offered this year

The following courses will be offered at the high school next year.

The new Stem Design Lab course is an art/science hybrid and the two new anthropology classes count as science electives. Robotics Engineering Design and Computer Aided Drafting are also being offered next year as science electives.  History is offering two new semester length courses, Sociology and Facing History.

 

Videos about the new anthropology and STEM Design class can be found here:

new anthro classes: http://screenr.com/FBMN

new stem lab classes: http://screenr.com/PNMN

Beginning next week, and continuing over the next several weeks, student schedules will be distributed beginning with the rising seniors.  Once they receive their schedule they may schedule an appointment with guidance if they would like to enroll in any of the new programs.  Students are required to enroll in a minimum of 30 credits each school year. These courses offer an opportunity to fill out their schedule.

Rising Junior, Sophomore and Freshman schedules will be distributed in subsequent weeks.  The staggered distribution will allow juniors and seniors first preference in the addition of electives.

 

 

STEM Design Lab
Semester 2.5 credits
9-12 CP and Honors
This project based course combines various areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, with art. Initial units of Industrial Design, Architecture, Front End Web Development (basics of HTML5, CSS, Javascript Programming), UX (User Experience Design), Data Visualization/Infographics, and additional design problems will be taught. Students will engage in research, writing, sketching, labs, activities, and projects. Then students will work in groups in a design area of their choosing to complete final projects. All process and work will be documented in online portfolios. Additionally, to mirror the methodology used currently in much of the technology sector, students will be working with a modified Agile and Scrum project management development to improve productivity and collaboration skills.

 

Biological and Medical Anthropology
Semester 2.5 credits
9-12 CP and Honors
Biological Anthropology is the study of human biological diversity over time and space. Students will start with basic primatology and go on to study hominid evolution based on the fossil record and evidence of tool making. Additional topics include Heredity and Genetics, Mechanisms of Evolution, Human Variation and Adaptation, and Anatomy and Culture. Student will then move on to an examination of the intersection of genetics, disease, and culture in the study of Medical Anthropology. Factors which influence health and well-being, the experience and distribution of illness, the prevention and treatment of sickness, healing processes, and the cultural importance and use of various medical systems will be explored. Honors and College Prep levels are taught simultaneously.

 

Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology
Semester 2.5 credits
9-12 CP and Honors
Anthropology is the scientific study of humans, society, culture, and biology. Students will learn about cultures past and present in a holistic and comparative way. Cultural Anthropology is the subfield that describes, analyzes, interprets, and explains social and cultural similarities and differences. Some aspects of society that will be covered are Subsistence Methods and Social Stratification, Marriage and Kinship, Ethnicity and Race, Economics and Politics, and Language and Communication. Archaeology is the examination of past human behavior and cultural patterns though the evidence of material remains. Students will analyze the rise and fall of civilizations over time. Honors and College Prep levels are taught simultaneously.

 

ROBOTICS DESIGN & ENGINEERING
Grade 9-12
555 Semester Honors  2.5 Credits
554 Semester CP 2.5 Credits  
This hands-on, rich and exciting multidisciplinary course will immerse you in the exciting and popular science of robotics.  Working in small teams, students will explore topics that include: engineering, applied physics, electronics and control theory and technology.  The interest in robotic devices and systems has exploded over the last few years, as advances in robotic technologies have proven useful in many human and government scientific endeavors.  This course introduces students to the exciting field of robotics, while providing unique opportunities to design, engineer, manufacture, test, program, and control robots while putting them through a series of real-world design challenges.  This course will require students to read in the content area, think critically, and work with other to solve challenging problems.  Lab work, research, troubleshooting, instrumentation and building/manufacturing will be an important part of the course.

 

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING (3D Solid Modeling with Pro/Engineer)
626 Semester Honors Grades 9-12
624 Semester CP 2.5 Credits
This class is a hands-on, exercise-intensive approach to all of the important parametric (geometric definitions of a design)  3D Modeling techniques and concepts. The goal of this course is to introduce and develop Parametric Modeling techniques and concepts for the CAD novice. Students will begin with constructing basic shapes and progress towards building intelligent solid 3D models that rotate with multiple views. This is accomplished through a series of ten tutorial style lessons. Each lesson builds upon the previous lesson, creating a solid foundation of Computer Aided Engineering skills.

 

SOCIOLOGY
GRADES 11-12
253 – Semester CP 2.5 Credits
254 – Semester Honors 2.5 Credits 
Sociology focuses on the systematic understanding of the way that societies work—or don’t work. By using methods, information, and observations of the social sciences, sociologists seek to make meaning out of the relationships and institutions within communities. Sociology combines analysis, empathy, and inquiry to build on theory and frame a deeper understanding of social constructs, perceptions, and realities. Possible topics include: social interaction, family and community, wealth and poverty, social constructs, deviance, social control, and social change.

 

 

FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES
GRADES 11-12
255 – Semester CP 2.5 Credits
256 – Semester H 2.5 Credits 
In order to promote greater awareness of the societal issues students will face in today’s world, this course will examine bias, racism, and prejudice in a historical context. Through the study of intolerance, genocide, and the Holocaust, students will be able to make the fundamental correlation between history and the moral and ethical choices they are forced to make on a daily basis in their own lives. While students will learn facts and background surrounding specific events in history, they will also be asked to examine the psychological motivations of the individual and of the group and the ethical implications of their actions.

 

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Stop Hunger Now Fundraiser hosted at Cape Ann Lanes

Seniors Alyssa Reeves and Paige Zaval host bowling night for their SCORE project. SCORE stands for “Senior Choice of Related Experience”, and during the last academic quarter, seniors complete a project of their choice, allowing them to explore a career that they may want to pursue in the future. Zaval and Reeves completed their SCORE project through fundraising for Global Issues class at Cape Ann Lanes.

Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students contribute to Stop Hunger Now by bowling at Cape Ann Lanes. For fifteen dollars, people could bowl for three games from 6-9. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students contribute to Stop Hunger Now by bowling at Cape Ann Lanes. For fifteen dollars, people could bowl for three games from 6-9. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Breanna Arnold, Bailey Graves, and Meghan Conway compete against each other in a lane. Cape Ann Lanes uses candlepin style bowling at their lanes, which originates from Worcester, Massachusetts. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Breanna Arnold, Bailey Graves, and Meghan Conway compete against each other in a lane. Cape Ann Lanes uses candlepin style bowling at their lanes, which originates from Worcester, Massachusetts. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Maddie Dahlin and Fiona Davis purchase tickets from Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves. Additional donations were also made for Stop Hunger Now as well as the proceeds from the bowling rounds. Credit:  Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Maddie Dahlin and Fiona Davis purchase tickets from Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves. Additional donations were also made for Stop Hunger Now as well as the proceeds from the bowling rounds. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bailey Graves enters names for the round on the keyboard. In Candlepin style bowling, there are ten rounds in each game, which is often called a “string”. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bailey Graves enters names for the round on the keyboard. In Candlepin style bowling, there are ten rounds in each game, which is often called a “string”. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Isabella Hickey begins to approach the foul line for the second round of the game. The three step approach is the most common technique for candlepin style bowling, and the less shifting weight from each foot makes the delivery more productive. Credit:  Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Isabella Hickey begins to approach the foul line for the second round of the game. The three step approach is the most common technique for candlepin style bowling, and the less shifting weight from each foot makes the delivery more productive. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves sell tickets at the table during the fundraiser. The goal of 260 dollars was reached and exceeded by about forty dollars. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves sell tickets at the table during the fundraiser. The goal of 260 dollars was reached and exceeded by about forty dollars. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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