Students throw a Tea Party!

Students of Elizabeth Edgerton’s honors English class discuss works of British literature over tea and baked goods.

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Research Ready teaches important informational literacy lessons

  Noticing a lack of mastery of research skills in students, librarian Sue Krause proposed and implemented an online informational literacy program, Research Ready, for all freshmen students to complete.

  “The idea started last spring. All teachers, including myself, noted how students really didn’t know where to go for research, what a legitimate source is or how to cite sources properly. It was becoming a pain for teachers to go over this every time a formal paper was assigned,” Krause said.

  After looking into various programs, Krause decided upon a program that could be done completely online.

  Research Ready, which is run by the makers of EasyBib, is composed of six different courses that are assigned periodically throughout the year.

  “The courses cover a wide spectrum of research related topics and subtopics, but the main six are the different types of sources, teaching the Internet, website evaluation to identify legitimate sources, conquering the research process, citations, and plagiarism,” she said.

  Students complete the various lessons and activities online, and once they finish, they receive a diploma, which they then must forward to their English teacher a for a homework grade.

  “The first due date is coming up in December. I think the idea of the program is great because now at least we’ll know that students have all received the same information on what is expected of their research,” English department chair Debra Isensee said.

  Krause expressed a similar sentiment, saying that the goal of the program is “for all freshmen to come out of the program with a very solid understanding of research skills and informational literacy skills that they can use for the rest of their high school career.”

  At the end of the program, English teachers will assess students’ success in each course and will then reinforce whatever they deem necessary.

  “I like Research Ready because it clarifies all of the questions I have when writing research papers, and the content is very reliable,” freshman Liddy DeConto said.

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Sixth graders hold in-class poem recital

English teachers Joanne Maino and Melissa Ulrich had each of their sixth grade students choose a poem and recite it in front of the class. The goal was for each student to memorize the poem and be able to present it and look at the poem as few times as possible.

 

Sixth grader Lorenzo Venegas-Villa recites his poem to the class from memory glancing at it as few times as possible. The poems had to be at least three stanzas or 12 lines long. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Lorenzo Venegas-Villa recites his poem to the class from memory glancing at it as few times as possible. The poems had to be at least three stanzas or 12 lines long. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students were not only graded on their performance, but also their behavior during other presentations. They were recommended to choose a poem that is unfamiliar to them to challenge themselves, or they could write and recite their own poem to the class. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students were not only graded on their performance, but also their behavior during other presentations. They were recommended to choose a poem that is unfamiliar to them to challenge themselves, or they could write and recite their own poem to the class. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Elisa Gallo discusses four interesting details about the poem she chose. These include two types of figurative language, what type of poem it is, and an interesting fact about the poet. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth grader Elisa Gallo discusses four interesting details about the poem she chose. These include two types of figurative language, what type of poem it is, and an interesting fact about the poet. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During each presentation, the class listens intently with copies of the poem that were handed out to them. Students were required to complete this assignment in order to help practice their public speaking skills and to learn about poetry. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
During each presentation, the class listens intently with copies of the poem that were handed out to them. Students were required to complete this assignment in order to help practice their public speaking skills and to learn about poetry. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth graders follow along while each student presents their poem. Each poem was expected to take two to three minutes to read. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sixth graders follow along while each student presents their poem. Each poem was expected to take two to three minutes to read. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

English teacher Joanne Maino snaps along with the rest of the class instead of clapping after each poem was recited. After students were finished, they handed in a copy of the poem and were graded based off of a rubric. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Joanne Maino snaps along with the rest of the class instead of clapping after each poem was recited. After students were finished, they handed in a copy of the poem and were graded based off of a rubric. Credit: Hannah White and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Cemetery visit teaches eighth graders setting

Eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante leads students in an activity to focus on the ways that setting could raise conflict and offer solutions. Students learn about the use of setting to affect a story.

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Eighth grade English class learns about literary genres

The eighth grade English class performs skits to help understand the different genres in writing. English teacher, Vidula Plante, created this lesson in order to teach her students about plot, setting, and characters.

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Juniors go to showing of The Great Gatsby at a local movie theater

After reading the novel, the Junior class took a field trip to Hollywood Hits in Danvers to watch The Great Gatsby.

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Manchester Essex Hosts a Poetry Slam

Manchester Essex Regional High School invited five poets to the school. The assembly was a poetry slam, which is a competition of who has the best poetry. Unlike common poetry, poetry slam is spoken faster, to a beat, and has more motion.

 

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Poet Alex Charalambides Comes to Manchester Essex

Poet Alex Charalambides spoke to ninth grade English classes about the techniques of writing poetry.

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Sixths Graders Awaken Their Inner Poet

English teacher Joanne Maino’s sixth grade English class dives into the beauty of poetry. The students all have memorized poems and are now reciting them aloud to each other.

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Library Hosts Book Fair

From the 3rd until the 7th of December, a book fair was set up in the library during school. Sponsored by The Book Shop in Beverly Farms, it featured a wide array of popular books for both the Middle and the High School.

 

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