Seventh grade English class interprets A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Every year, Abby Whittrege’s seventh grade English class studies Shakespeare’s comedy A Midsummmer Night’s Drean as part of their drama unit. This is one of the essential rites of passages for children at MERMS, and stands out in the minds of many older students as one of their favorite memories of middle school.

Two copies of A Midsummer Night’s Dream sit next to one another. The copy on the left contains the complete and unabridged original text, while the copy on the right adds a modern translation that any English speaker can understand. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is about the marriage of Theseus, duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons. Four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors (called “mechanicals”) are controlled and manipulated by the faeries who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set. Whittredge has been teaching the play for over fifteen years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two copies of A Midsummer Night’s Dream sit next to one another. The copy on the left contains the complete and unabridged original text, while the copy on the right adds a modern translation that any English speaker can understand. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is about the marriage of Theseus, duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons. Four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors (called “mechanicals”) are controlled and manipulated by the faeries who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set. Whittredge has been teaching the play for over fifteen years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shortly after beginning the play, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class created blackout poems. They took pages from copies that were about to be destroyed and blacked out lines from the play so all that is left is what the viewer can read, adding in their own artwork and designs. This is just one of many activities Whittredge uses with her students in class. “We act the play out as we read,” she says. “Some of the kids are actors, some of them are directors. There are also set designers, costume designers, coreographers. A few of my students even create musical compositions for each scene. When we’re finished, each group picks the one scene they like the best and perform it in front of the whole class.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shortly after beginning A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class created blackout poems. They took pages from copies that were about to be destroyed and blacked out lines from the play so all that is left is what the viewer can read, adding in their own artwork and designs. This is just one of many activities Whittredge uses with her students in class. “We act the play out as we read,” she says. “Some of the kids are actors, some of them are directors. There are also set designers, costume designers, coreographers. A few of my students even create musical compositions for each scene. When we’re finished, each group picks the one scene they like the best and perform it in front of the whole class.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In class, seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge tells her students what will happen in the next scene of A Midsummer Night’s Dream while the class follows along in their copies of the play. William Shakespeare is known to have written at least thirty-five plays during his lifetime. Of all the comedies, tragedies, and histories in the Bard’s oeuvre, Whittredge teaches A Midsummer Night’s Dream because she thinks it is a great play for middle schoolers. “It’s funny, it’s confusing, it’s silly, and it’s crazy,” she said. “It’s everything seventh graders love. The tragedies, they’re a lot harder for them, so I think the comedies are the way to go with the middle school.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In class, seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge tells her students what will happen in the next scene of A Midsummer Night’s Dream while the class follows along in their copies of the play. William Shakespeare is known to have written at least thirty-five plays during his lifetime. Of all the comedies, tragedies, and histories in the Bard’s oeuvre, Whittredge teaches A Midsummer Night’s Dream because she thinks it is a great play for middle schoolers. “It’s funny, it’s confusing, it’s silly, and it’s crazy,” she said. “It’s everything seventh graders love. The tragedies, they’re a lot harder for them, so I think the comedies are the way to go with the middle school.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once she has given them her scene overview, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English students read the scene to their classmates. Whittredge divides each of her classes into smaller groups, each consisting of the same people who worked on the picture book project from earlier in the drama unit. “I assign them their roles in the play, and each person plays a different character,” they said. “But when a character isn’t on stage acting, then they have other jobs. I ask, ‘who’s never been a director, who’s never been a set designer, who’s never been a composer? Who’s never done choreography or costume design?’ And then they read the whole scene of the play that we’re in with the mindset of a set designer or a member of the stage crew, something along those lines. They still have to read the play, but they’re reading it like a support member of the cast, not an actual actor.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once she has given them her scene overview, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English students read the scene to their classmates. Whittredge divides each of her classes into smaller groups, each consisting of the same people who worked on the picture book project from earlier in the drama unit. “I assign them their roles in the play, and each person plays a different character,” they said. “But when a character isn’t on stage acting, then they have other jobs. I ask, ‘who’s never been a director, who’s never been a set designer, who’s never been a composer? Who’s never done choreography or costume design?’ And then they read the whole scene of the play that we’re in with the mindset of a set designer or a member of the stage crew, something along those lines. They still have to read the play, but they’re reading it like a support member of the cast, not an actual actor.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After they have read through their scene, actors, directors, set designers, costume designers, coreographers, and composers in Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class decide how they will act it out. This year at MERMS, five members of Shakespeare & Company, a theatre troupe based in Lenox, hosted theatre workshops for grades six through eight. According to Whittredge, this change affected her curriculum tremendously. “I think the kids were really excited about Shakespeare,” she said. “I think they always are, they love him. But I think this year, they were less intimidated by him. They thought reading him would be more fun, and they couldn’t have been more right.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After they have read through their scene, actors, directors, set designers, costume designers, coreographers, and composers in Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class decide how they will act it out. This year at MERMS, five members of Shakespeare & Company, a theatre troupe based in Lenox, hosted theatre workshops for grades six through eight. According to Whittredge, this change affected her curriculum tremendously. “I think the kids were really excited about Shakespeare,” she said. “I think they always are, they love him. But I think this year, they were less intimidated by him. They thought reading him would be more fun, and they couldn’t have been more right.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In the seventh grade pod, each group in Abby Whittredge’s English class performs their scene in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When asked about how her students react to the unit, Whittredge said, “They always love Shakespeare, because they love acting out the play and generally not sitting down. They love directing, they love costumes, they love set design… I think they like the whole thing. Most of what we do involves getting up and participating. It’s not just sitting down and writing something. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In the seventh grade pod, each group in Abby Whittredge’s English class performs their scene in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When asked about how her students react to the unit, Whittredge said, “They always love Shakespeare, because they love acting out the play and generally not sitting down. They love directing, they love costumes, they love set design… I think they like the whole thing. Most of what we do involves getting up and participating. It’s not just sitting down and writing something. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Once each group has presented their scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class watches a film adaptation of the play. Whittredge’s favorite part about teaching the play is when she sees her students have “that moment where they understand what’s going on, where they get it, and they laugh at the jokes without me telling them.” She also loves “getting to see the talents of kids who maybe aren’t always as good at English, and all of a sudden, you get to see that they’re maybe good at Shakespeare and they’re good at acting! They’re great directors! They’re fantastic artists! I just learn so many things about them that I don’t get to see all the time.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once each group has presented their scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class watches a film adaptation of the play. Whittredge’s favorite part about teaching the play is when she sees her students have “that moment where they understand what’s going on, where they get it, and they laugh at the jokes without me telling them.” She also loves “getting to see the talents of kids who maybe aren’t always as good at English, and all of a sudden, you get to see that they’re maybe good at Shakespeare and they’re good at acting! They’re great directors! They’re fantastic artists! I just learn so many things about them that I don’t get to see all the time.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grade English class learns about theatre through the art of the picture book

Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class is currently doing a unit on drama. In order to introduce her students to the basics of theatre, she divides them into groups and has them work together to each act out a different picture book.

Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge welcomes her students to the auditorium on the day her students present their projects. Whittredge has been using picture books in her drama unit for about four years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge welcomes her students to the auditorium on the day her students present their projects. Whittredge has been using picture books in her drama unit for about four years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The first group of students to present performs their rendition of Margaret Wise Brown’s bedtime classic Goodnight Moon. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge organizes the project by putting her students in groups of three or four by their abilities in front of a group. “Shy kids are always with shy kids,” she said, “and loud kids are all together. Medium kids are all together. The reason why is because I don’t want the loud kids to take over all the groups. I want them to know what it’s like to work with kids who are like them. I want quiet kids not to stand behind other people who are not comfortable on stage. I want everybody to learn how to compromise if you’re one of the vocal people, to learn how to accept other people’s ideas, or to shut up and listen. And the quiet kids need to learn how to take charge.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The first group of students to present performs their rendition of Margaret Wise Brown’s bedtime classic Goodnight Moon. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge organizes the project by putting her students in groups of three or four by their abilities in front of a group. “Shy kids are always with shy kids,” she said, “and loud kids are all together. Medium kids are all together. The reason why is because I don’t want the loud kids to take over all the groups. I want them to know what it’s like to work with kids who are like them. I want quiet kids not to stand behind other people who are not comfortable on stage. I want everybody to learn how to compromise if you’re one of the vocal people, to learn how to accept other people’s ideas, or to shut up and listen. And the quiet kids need to learn how to take charge.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The next group of students uses props, singing, and dancing to reenact Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, a book written by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambeault and illustrated by Louis Elhert that teaches the alphabet. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge assigns the book she wants each group to use. “They memorize the book as an actor,” she said. “Then, as a director, they have a vision for what it’s going to look like on stage. Then, they do the choreography where they block it all out, and they also do the costumes and everything.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The next group of students uses props, singing, and dancing to reenact Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, a book written by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambeault and illustrated by Louis Elhert that teaches the alphabet. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge assigns the book she wants each group to use. “They memorize the book as an actor,” she said. “Then, as a director, they have a vision for what it’s going to look like on stage. Then, they do the choreography where they block it all out, and they also do the costumes and everything.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Another group in seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge’s class acts out Snuggle Puppy by Sandra Boynton. In preparation for the project, Whittredge introduces her students to several important elements of drama, including projection, annunciation, eye contact, and voice inflection. She also teaches her students about looking at the audience, projecting one’s voice, speaking clearly, and how to change one’s voice to create a tone. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Another group in seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge’s class acts out Snuggle Puppy by Sandra Boynton. In preparation for the project, Whittredge introduces her students to several important elements of drama, including projection, annunciation, eye contact, and voice inflection. She also teaches her students about looking at the audience, projecting one’s voice, speaking clearly, and how to change one’s voice to create a tone. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge chooses a different set of books for each of her classes. For the block being photographed, she selected Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy E. Shaw, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, Goodnight Moon (both already mentioned), and, written by Sandra Boynton, Moo! Baa! La La La!, Hippos Go Berserk, Snuggle Puppy, and The Barnyard Dance, performed by the group shown above. Whittredge chooses the books based on what her son loved when he was younger. She also has a master’s degree in children’s literature, and tries to keep up with the new trends in picture books in order to add new things to her list. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge chooses a different set of books for each of her classes. For the block being photographed, she selected Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy E. Shaw, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, Goodnight Moon (both already mentioned), and, written by Sandra Boynton, Moo! Baa! La La La!, Hippos Go Berserk, Snuggle Puppy, and The Barnyard Dance, performed by the group shown above. Whittredge chooses the books based on what her son loved when he was younger. She also has a master’s degree in children’s literature, and tries to keep up with the new trends in picture books in order to add new things to her list. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The last group to present their performance stages Moo! Baa! La La La! in front of Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class. The picture book project is the beginning of Whittredge’s Shakespeare unit. “I teach them all the hard stuff – projection, annunciation, voice inflection, those things – with something simple and easy like a picture book,” she said. “If you can do it with a picture book, you learn it on something easy, then you can transfer it to something hard, like Shakespeare.” The project is worth several participation grades, and the performance acts as a quiz. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The last group to present their performance stages Moo! Baa! La La La! in front of Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class. The picture book project is the beginning of Whittredge’s Shakespeare unit. “I teach them all the hard stuff – projection, annunciation, voice inflection, those things – with something simple and easy like a picture book,” she said. “If you can do it with a picture book, you learn it on something easy, then you can transfer it to something hard, like Shakespeare.” The project is worth several participation grades, and the performance acts as a quiz. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

As her seventh grade English class watches their fellow students perform, Abby Whittredge grades each group’s project. Student feedback has been extremely positive every year Whittredge has used the project in her classroom. “Everybody loves it, and I’m always shocked at how good they are,” she said. “Very few people get less than a B-plus, because they work really hard! And not because I’m an easy grader, it’s because they work so hard to do a good job.” Whittredge’s favorite part of the project is seeing her students demonstrate their creativity. “They’ll take something that I think ought to look a certain way, and they’ll change it, and do something way cooler than I ever thought about doing. And it looks awesome and it’s so smart and good, and it’s just a way for me to see them in a different light.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As her seventh grade English class watches their fellow students perform, Abby Whittredge grades each group’s project. Student feedback has been extremely positive every year Whittredge has used the project in her classroom. “Everybody loves it, and I’m always shocked at how good they are,” she said. “Very few people get less than a B-plus, because they work really hard! And not because I’m an easy grader, it’s because they work so hard to do a good job.” Whittredge’s favorite part of the project is seeing her students demonstrate their creativity. “They’ll take something that I think ought to look a certain way, and they’ll change it, and do something way cooler than I ever thought about doing. And it looks awesome and it’s so smart and good, and it’s just a way for me to see them in a different light.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Eighth graders participate in Shakespearean theatre workshop

Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class is currently doing a unit on Macbeth. As part of this unit, five members of Shakespeare & Company, a theatre troupe based in the Berkshire town of Lenox, visited MERMS to host a theatre workshop for her students.

Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company leads eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante’s class in a warm-up, involving various forms of exercise. In the days leading up to the theatre workshop, Shakespeare & Company performed Hamlet for the middle school, in which Reed played the title role. “I contacted them to see if we could attend a play that they were staging,” Plante said, “and that play was Hamlet. And then in speaking to them I learned that they could also come to our school and do workshops, and rather than spending the money getting the kids out to the Berkshires, we thought we would invite the troupe, have them stage the play here, and conduct workshops at each grade level. So I had to write a grant for that, and that took a lot of time and energy, but it was totally worth it!” She has submitted another grant for Shakespeare & Company to come again next year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company leads eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante’s class in a warm-up, involving various forms of exercise. In the days leading up to the theatre workshop, Shakespeare & Company performed Hamlet for the middle school, in which Reed played the title role. “I contacted them to see if we could attend a play that they were staging,” Plante said, “and that play was Hamlet. And then in speaking to them I learned that they could also come to our school and do workshops, and rather than spending the money getting the kids out to the Berkshires, we thought we would invite the troupe, have them stage the play here, and conduct workshops at each grade level. So I had to write a grant for that, and that took a lot of time and energy, but it was totally worth it!” She has submitted another grant for Shakespeare & Company to come again next year. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In another part of the warm-up, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class is divided into two rival tribes, who are locked in heated battle as they discover that they are each other’s long-lost siblings. Plante discovered the company over the summer while searching for resources to help her teach Macbeth in class. She believes they are a rare combination in theatre education  – “they know Shakespeare and can perform him well,” and “they know students and can work with them well.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In another part of the warm-up, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class is divided into two rival tribes, who are locked in heated battle as they discover that they are each other’s long-lost siblings. Plante discovered the company over the summer while searching for resources to help her teach Macbeth in class. She believes they are a rare combination in theatre education – “they know Shakespeare and can perform him well,” and “they know students and can work with them well.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Later on in the warm-up, Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company, who played the title role in their production of Hamlet, orders the classmates into a circle and calls on students to recite a famous Shakespeare soliloquy. When the students are called on, they must repeat a motion Reed assigns them, such as doing jumping jacks or running in place. When asked why she chose Macbeth out of Shakespeare’s thirty-five plays, Plante said, “Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s four best known tragedies. It’s also his shortest play, and it’s set during feudal times, so it ties in with what Mr. Thomas is teaching in his history class. We wanted something that we could integrate into the current setting but would be accessible for students.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Later on in the warm-up, Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company orders the classmates into a circle and calls on students to recite a famous Shakespeare soliloquy. When the students are called on, they must repeat a motion Reed assigns them, such as doing jumping jacks or running in place. When asked why she chose Macbeth out of Shakespeare’s thirty-five plays, Plante said, “Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s four best known tragedies. It’s also his shortest play, and it’s set during feudal times, so it ties in with what Mr. Thomas is teaching in his history class. We wanted something that we could integrate into the current setting but would be accessible for students.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the five members of Shakespeare & Company divide the Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class into groups, they hand them each a different series of fragmented lines from pivotal scenes in Macbeth. Plante’s group works together to decide how they will act out this scene in front of the class, using only these lines, a few props, and the combined imagination of her students. The theater workshops were organized in groups of up to fifty students. “We took the eighth grade and divided them up into three groups at three stations,” Plante said. “A group would attend the workshop while the other two were doing an MCAS review activity and a third team choice activity, which happened at each grade level.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After the five members of Shakespeare & Company divide the Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class into groups, they hand them each a different series of fragmented lines from pivotal scenes in Macbeth. Plante’s group works together to decide how they will act out this scene in front of the class, using only these lines, a few props, and the combined imagination of her students. The theater workshops were organized in groups of up to fifty students. “We took the eighth grade and divided them up into three groups at three stations,” Plante said. “A group would attend the workshop while the other two were doing an MCAS review activity and a third team choice activity, which happened at each grade level.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once they had decided how they would act out their scene, each group took some time to rehearse it. Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company watches as his group practices for the group performance. According to eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante, the student feedback regarding the workshops was very positive. “My students said that they thought that the actors interacted well with them, and that they made it fun for everyone,” she said, sharing results from a class survey. “They thought the opening warm-up was a great way to break the ice and move people outside their comfort zone. They felt the actors were outgoing and helped them take risks while they were acting, and they thought that moving from a large group to a small group was a great way to manage things. They also loved the presentation of Hamlet. They thought that it was cool that they added so much humor to it, they found it interesting, and they thought each actor did a great job building a specific personality for each character.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once they had decided how they would act out their scene, each group took some time to rehearse it. Luke Reed of Shakespeare & Company watches as his group practices for the group performance. According to eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante, the student feedback regarding the workshops was very positive. “My students said that they thought that the actors interacted well with them, and that they made it fun for everyone,” she said, sharing results from a class survey. “They thought the opening warm-up was a great way to break the ice and move people outside their comfort zone. They felt the actors were outgoing and helped them take risks while they were acting, and they thought that moving from a large group to a small group was a great way to manage things. They also loved the presentation of Hamlet. They thought that it was cool that they added so much humor to it, they found it interesting, and they thought each actor did a great job building a specific personality for each character.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class performance has begun. Before each group presents their scene from Macbeth, Ally Allen of Shakespeare & Company (who played Ophelia in their production of Hamlet) provides some context regarding the plot, setting, and characters so it is less confusing to the class, which has not yet finished the cursed “Scottish Play.” The Shakespeare unit, of course, is not confined to the auditorium, and in the classroom, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class does some interpretation of the characters through acting, some prop analysis by looking at which characters could be connected to certain props, and reading the play and engaging in Socratic circles. “They’re very much like a typical small group question-and-answer, except we do it as a larger group,” she said. “Sometimes it’s half the class, sometimes it’s the whole class. The students start by posing a question, and other students answer. Then, they move on to additional questions, often generating their own meaning of the text in a discussion that’s not teacher-led or directed.” Shakespeare also uses a lot of dramatic irony in setting up the story, and according to Plante, “there are places where the play becomes more engaging because we can see how it’s going to unfold.” Her class often talks about the rhetorical devices of pathos, logos, and ethos, and applies them to several scenes in the play. Plante is also interested in “the theme of fate versus free will” and “how the characters distinctly represent their ideas, what their motivations are, and how they change.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class performance has begun. Before each group presents their scene from Macbeth, Ally Allen of Shakespeare & Company (who played Ophelia in their production of Hamlet) provides some context regarding the plot, setting, and characters so it is less confusing to the class, which has not yet finished the cursed “Scottish Play.” The Shakespeare unit, of course, is not confined to the auditorium, and in the classroom, Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class does some interpretation of the characters through acting, some prop analysis by looking at which characters could be connected to certain props, and reading the play and engaging in Socratic circles. “They’re very much like a typical small group question-and-answer, except we do it as a larger group,” she said. “Sometimes it’s half the class, sometimes it’s the whole class. The students start by posing a question, and other students answer. Then, they move on to additional questions, often generating their own meaning of the text in a discussion that’s not teacher-led or directed.” Shakespeare also uses a lot of dramatic irony in setting up the story, and according to Plante, “there are places where the play becomes more engaging because we can see how it’s going to unfold.” Her class often talks about the rhetorical devices of pathos, logos, and ethos, and applies them to several scenes in the play. Plante is also interested in “the theme of fate versus free will” and “how the characters distinctly represent their ideas, what their motivations are, and how they change.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

A group of students from Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class recite to the auditorium their rendition of Macbeth’s final soliloquy, one of the most famous speeches in the English language. When asked what she enjoyed the most about having Shakespeare & Company host theatre workshops at MERMS, Plante said, “Their rapport with students was strong, but I think they had a strong rapport with each other. And so after the workshops, I said to my students, ‘Did you enjoy how much they enjoyed what they were doing?’ I wish for my students that whatever they choose in their futures, they can be as appreciative and engaged in what they do,  because the sheer joy that they brought to Shakespeare and to working with kids was contagious.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A group of students from Vidula Plante’s eighth grade English class recite to the auditorium their rendition of Macbeth’s final soliloquy, one of the most famous speeches in the English language. When asked what she enjoyed the most about having Shakespeare & Company host theatre workshops at MERMS, Plante said, “Their rapport with students was strong, but I think they had a strong rapport with each other. And so after the workshops, I said to my students, ‘Did you enjoy how much they enjoyed what they were doing?’ I wish for my students that whatever they choose in their futures, they can be as appreciative and engaged in what they do, because the sheer joy that they brought to Shakespeare and to working with kids was contagious.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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English class begins reading “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

Allison Krause’s  10th grade CP English class begins to read “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain. This novel raises extreme controversy over its use of the N-word over 200 times throughout the book. Some English classes in America have switched to a modified version of the book were the N-word is replaced with the word slave each time it is used. After reading the book, the class will be required to write a 4 page paper arguing whether the book promotes or condemns racism.

Students review worksheets that will need to be completed for the major paper at the end of the novel. The worksheet will include quotes from the text that either promote racism or condemn it. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
Students review worksheets that will need to be completed for the major paper at the end of the novel. The worksheet will include quotes from the text that either promote racism or condemn it. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
English teacher Allison Krause clarifies to the class what will be expected when writing about an extremely controversial book such as “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The paper will need to be at least 4 pages long and argue that the book either promotes racism or condemns it. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
English teacher Allison Krause clarifies to the class what will be expected when writing about an extremely controversial book such as “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The book is set before the Civil War and is about a boy who is traveling with an runaway slave to the free states farther north. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.

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Sophomore Jennifer Beardsley begins to read “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The English CP class has begun to read this controversial novel in preparation for a major four page paper. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
Sophomore Jennifer Beardsley begins to read “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”. The English CP class has begun to read this controversial novel in preparation for a major four page paper. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
The class reviews the website librovox.com for free audio book recordings on each chapter of Huckleberry Finn. Audio books for Huckleberry Finn are also found on Youtube.com. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.
The class reviews the website librovox.com for free audio book recordings on each chapter of Huckleberry Finn. Audio books for Huckleberry Finn are also found on Youtube.com. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex multimedia online.

 

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Students pick courses for next year.

Students in the sophomore class met with the guidance department to select courses. Students were able to choose and look at the classes they have selected and want to be in for the following year.

Students in Dan Donoto’s F block English class worked with guidance on course selection. Students were choosing electives and looking at the classes they are in for next year. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in Dan Donoto’s F block English class worked with guidance on course selection. Students were choosing electives and looking at the classes they are in for next year. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jenny Beardsley looks over her anticipated courses for next year. Each student has at least seven classes. Classes are offered in either college prep (CP), honors (H), or advanced placement (AP). Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jenny Beardsley looks over her anticipated courses for next year. Each student has at least seven classes. Classes are offered in either college prep (CP), honors (H), or advanced placement (AP). Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Peter Coyne and Charlie Baker share their classes for the following year with each other. During this process students are advised to check their current grades in their classes. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Peter Coyne and Charlie Baker share their classes for the following year with each other. During this process students are advised to check their current grades in their classes. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Student Ryan Field chooses exploratories for junior year. Guidance counselor Gillian Polk advises Field on which classes would best suit him. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Student Ryan Field chooses exploratories for junior year. Guidance counselor Gillian Polk advises Field on which classes would best suit him. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students talk among themselves after they finish choosing their classes. High school classes were able to meet with the guidance department on course selection for their future high school career. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students talk among themselves after they finish choosing their classes. High school classes were able to meet with the guidance department on course selection for their future high school career. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Parents learn about classes at the high school

Parents follow their children’s schedules to go over the syllabi of each class with teachers.  Parent Night is an annual event held each September, and is a way for parents to meet teachers.
Seniors Lila Etter, Bailey Graves, and Louisa Spofford hand out schedules to parents that show them where they should go to meet their children’s teachers.  The parents visited their children’s teachers for ten minutes each to go over what the students will be doing in the class this year.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Lila Etter, Bailey Graves, and Louisa Spofford hand out schedules to parents that show them where they should go to meet their children’s teachers. The parents visited their children’s teachers for ten minutes each to go over what the students will be doing in the class this year. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Joshua Ward represents the SoundWaves, an A Cappella group run by chorus teacher Donna O’Neill.  The SoundWaves perform at every major Manchester Essex Regional High School concert.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Joshua Ward represents the SoundWaves, an A Cappella group run by chorus teacher Donna O’Neill. The SoundWaves perform at every major Manchester Essex Regional High School concert. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior William Kannengieser and senior Charles Brennan provide information to parents about the high school’s DECA program.  DECA is a business and marketing program, and they participate in regional and national competitions.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior William Kannengieser and senior Charles Brennan provide information to parents about the high school’s DECA program. DECA is a business and marketing program, and they participate in regional and national competitions. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Tucker Evans and Junior Sara Rhuda play piano in the auditorium for the parents as they walk in.  Evans and Rhuda are both members of the high school chorus and the SoundWaves, so they perform at occasions similar to parent night as well.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior Tucker Evans and Junior Sara Rhuda play piano in the auditorium for the parents as they walk in. Evans and Rhuda are both members of the high school chorus and the SoundWaves, so they perform at occasions similar to parent night as well. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
History teacher Jennifer Coleman displays her website to parents.  Coleman explains that she puts not only homework assignments on her website, but also resources to further help students understand historical events.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
History teacher Jennifer Coleman displays her website to parents. Coleman explains that she puts not only homework assignments on her website, but also resources to further help students understand historical events. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Foreign Language teacher Erin Fortunato goes over the plan for her French III Honors class to the parents of her students.  Fortunato describes the course topics as well as the expectations that she has of her students’ work.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Foreign Language teacher Erin Fortunato goes over the plan for her French III Honors class to the parents of her students. Fortunato describes the course topics as well as the expectations that she has of her students’ work. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Allison Krause gives a description of her class to parents.  Krause has taught at Manchester Essex Regional High School for nine years, and she went to Manchester High School as a student.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Allison Krause gives a description of her class to parents. Krause has taught at Manchester Essex Regional High School for nine years, and she went to Manchester High School as a student. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Liz Edgerton explains her plans for one of her classes to parents.  Along with being an English teacher, Edgerton is also the head of the high school drama club. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
English teacher Liz Edgerton explains her plans for one of her classes to parents. Along with being an English teacher, Edgerton is also the head of the high school drama club. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Maria Burgess meets the parents of some of her biology students.  Burgess teaches not only biology, but also anatomy and physiology and Authentic Science Research.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Maria Burgess meets the parents of some of her biology students. Burgess teaches not only biology, but also anatomy and physiology and Authentic Science Research. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

DECA teacher Dean Martino explains the values and work ethic that he expects in his DECA students.  DECA has won various business and marketing competitions regionally and nationally.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
DECA teacher Dean Martino explains the values and work ethic that he expects in his DECA students. DECA has won various business and marketing competitions regionally and nationally. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Manchester Essex Regional High School Ranked 18 in State

Manchester Essex High School was recently ranked number 18 in the state of Massachusetts by US News and World Reports. The school ranked 118 in the nation for STEM and 394 in the country overall. The district was ranked 15 in Boston Magazine’s Best Schools in Boston 2013. The teacher student ratio is 14:1 and 91.5% of Advanced Placement students scored a 3-5 on their AP tests.  MERHS is known for its athletic teams, art programs, and teaching and learning strategies. The following photos show some of the great learning and doing at the school.

The High school engineering class created a self-made light bulb only using ingredients found in the classroom. The class is learning about electrical charges and how batteries send currents through the wires, to the graphite and that sparks a flame, which creates the light. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The High school engineering class created a self-made light bulb only using ingredients found in the classroom. The class is learning about electrical charges and how batteries send currents through the wires, to the graphite and that sparks a flame, which creates the light. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Tyler Malik after several tries finally got his light to illuminate. The bulb would only burn for thirty seconds or less. One group of students got their bulb to burn for a minute and forty five seconds because of the numerous rods of graphite. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Tyler Malik after several tries finally got his light to illuminate. The bulb would only burn for thirty seconds or less. One group of students got their bulb to burn for a minute and forty five seconds because of the numerous rods of graphite. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school English class goes over prepositional phrases, and adjective phrases. Elizabeth Edgerton teaches that all parts of a sentence go together and always have a subject and a predicate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school English class goes over prepositional phrases, and adjective phrases. Elizabeth Edgerton teaches that all parts of a sentence go together and always have a subject and a predicate. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen David LaForge volunteers to explain and underline the prepositional phrases in a paragraph projected on the board. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen David LaForge volunteers to explain and underline the prepositional phrases in a paragraph projected on the board. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Physics teacher Phil Logsdon offers students to go to the board and explain the parts of the eye to the class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Physics teacher Phil Logsdon offers students to go to the board and explain the parts of the eye to the class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students explain the inside of the eye and how eyes are some most important parts of the body. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students explain the inside of the eye and how eyes are some most important parts of the body. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school students at the near end of the year are given a research paper. Students peer edit each other’s work to make sure there are no grammatical errors or layout problems. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school students at the near end of the year are given a research paper. Students peer edit each other’s work to make sure there are no grammatical errors or layout problems. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The library is a place for students to quietly and efficiently get work done with no distractions during a study hall. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The library is a place for students to quietly and efficiently get work done with no distractions during a study hall. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior T.C. Fougere pays close attention to his history class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior T.C. Fougere pays close attention to his history class. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in Abigail Donnelly’s junior’s history class read a letter projected on the board that explains a key detail in the unit they are studying. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in Abigail Donnelly’s junior’s history class read a letter projected on the board that explains a key detail in the unit they are studying. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The high school has an open door policy in the front office. The principal Patricia Puglisi converses with freshmen student Phoebe Savje about upcoming events in the district. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The high school has an open door policy in the front office. The principal Patricia Puglisi converses with freshmen student Phoebe Savje about upcoming events in the district. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The world language department has many great tactics to help students study for tests and quizzes efficiently and effectively. Students in Erin Fortunato’s Spanish class, students are put into groups of two and three and have to re write English sentences on the board in Spanish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The world language department has many great tactics to help students study for tests and quizzes efficiently and effectively. Students in Erin Fortunato’s Spanish class, students are put into groups of two and three and have to re write English sentences on the board in Spanish. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Working hard together, freshmen Lilly Calandra, Cole Charlton, and Evan Pennoyer talk and work together on how to correctly re-write the sentence. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Working hard together, freshmen Lilly Calandra, Cole Charlton, and Evan Pennoyer talk and work together on how to correctly re-write the sentence. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The math department focuses on many things throughout the school year. Students in Sarah Deluca’s freshmen math class listen to the instructions of their next activity, before they are handed a worksheet and sent on their own to do it.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The math department focuses on many things throughout the school year. Students in Sarah Deluca’s freshmen math class listen to the instructions of their next activity, before they are handed a worksheet and sent on their own to do it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Ford works intently on a math worksheet that has students figure out the x and why axis coordinates on a graph. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Andrew Ford works intently on a math worksheet that has students figure out the x and why axis coordinates on a graph. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Learning strategies class helps students in all grades in the high school on skills they need to focus on. It helps students on an IEP and 504 contracts. It gives students a time for extra help on quizzes and tests, and extra help on homework. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The Learning strategies class helps students in all grades in the high school on skills they need to focus on. It helps students on an IEP and 504 contracts. It gives students a time for extra help on quizzes and tests, and extra help on homework. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Teacher’s hands on work with students to get though work that person is struggling with. The Learning strategies class focuses on all subjects. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Teacher’s hands on work with students to get though work that person is struggling with. The Learning strategies class focuses on all subjects. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Manchester Essex Multimedia Online is a class to keep the Manchester Essex Middle High school up to date with the latest news and things happening with in the school. Students shoot stories of things happening with in the school district, events happening on weekends or even at night, MEMO students are there to shoot it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Manchester Essex Multimedia Online is a class to keep the Manchester Essex Middle High school up to date with the latest news and things happening with in the school. Students shoot stories of things happening with in the school district, events happening on weekends or even at night, MEMO students are there to shoot it. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grade English class performs Shakespeare

Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class is currently doing a unit on drama. As a part of this unit, the class is reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare. Each person was assigned a role, and the class is interpreting and acting out the play.

Students watch as their fellow classmates make their way up to the front of the room in preparation to act out the second scene of the first act of the play. In this scene, craftsmen are planning a play to perform at the wedding of King Theseus and Queen Hippolyta. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students watch as their fellow classmates make their way up to the front of the room in preparation to act out the second scene of the first act of the play. In this scene, craftsmen are planning a play to perform at the wedding of King Theseus and Queen Hippolyta. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A group of students stands in line during the first part of the scene. Students were instructed to never allow their backs to face the audience; each time an actor showed his or her back, students watching the scene were encouraged to say “Cut!” in order to allow actors to change how they performed the scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A group of students stands in line during the first part of the scene. Students were instructed to never allow their backs to face the audience; each time an actor showed his or her back, students watching the scene were encouraged to say “Cut!” in order to allow actors to change how they performed the scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Actors listen as the student who played Nick Bottom, a weaver, read his lines. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was originally performed between 1592 and 1596 in England. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Actors listen as the student who played Nick Bottom, a weaver, read his lines. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was originally performed between 1592 and 1596 in England. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A table of students laughs while observing a scene in the play. William Shakespeare is known for including elements of comedy in his plays; such as a joke about the French king in this scene of the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A table of students laughs while observing a scene in the play. William Shakespeare is known for including elements of comedy in his plays; such as a joke about the French king in this scene of the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
English teacher Abby Whittredge demonstrates how a group of lines by the character Nick Bottom must be read. Most of Shakespeare’s plays were performed at the Globe Theater located in England.  Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
English teacher Abby Whittredge demonstrates how a group of lines by the character Nick Bottom must be read. Most of Shakespeare’s plays were performed at the Globe Theater located in England. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students read along as the scene is performed. Teacher Abby Whittredge provided books for the students, but some opted to purchase a copy of the play that included the lines translated into more modern English. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students read along as the scene is performed. Teacher Abby Whittredge provided books for the students, but some opted to purchase a copy of the play that included the lines translated into more modern English. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Ben Lantz assists actors in the blocking out of the scene by providing ideas about where and how they should stand. Blocking determines where and how actors should say their lines during a scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Seventh grader Ben Lantz assists actors in the blocking out of the scene by providing ideas about where and how they should stand. Blocking determines where and how actors should say their lines during a scene. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

English teacher Abby Whittredge joins the actors on stage to suggest how a conversation between Quince and Bottom should be read. Quince is attempting to convince Bottom to play the part of Pyramus, while Bottom has his heart set on playing every single part in the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
English teacher Abby Whittredge joins the actors on stage to suggest how a conversation between Quince and Bottom should be read. Quince is attempting to convince Bottom to play the part of Pyramus, while Bottom has his heart set on playing every single part in the play. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Sophomore English class travels to the cemetery to read poetry

Allison Krause and Connie Bergh who co-teach college prep sophomore English took students to the cemetery to read poetry. As the weather became nice the teachers wanted to enjoy it while learning at the same time.

The class walked out of the school and over to the cemetery on Arbella Street. Many of the students were excited to go outside and enjoy the warm weather. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class walked out of the school and over to the cemetery on Arbella Street. Many of the students were excited to go outside and enjoy the warm weather. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class surrouned of the sunken graves found in the cemetery. Krause discusses the meaning of the poem to the students. The students came to the conclusion that part of the grave must have been dug out so the name on the stone was visible. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class surrouned of the sunken graves found in the cemetery. Krause discusses the meaning of the poem to the students. The students came to the conclusion that part of the grave must have been dug out so the name on the stone was visible. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Alex Beckman, Brad Graves, Jake Rich, and Chris Milne all read the poem before the class had a discussion. The class has been reading multiple poems by Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman for the poetry unit. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Alex Beckman, Brad Graves, Jake Rich, and Chris Milne all read the poem before the class had a discussion. The class has been reading multiple poems by Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman for the poetry unit. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the girls of the English class all sat together and read “Because I could not stop for Death”, by Emily Dickinson. The mood of the poem in matched the mood of the graveyard; both dark and gloomy. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the girls of the English class all sat together and read “Because I could not stop for Death”, by Emily Dickinson. The mood of the poem in matched the mood of the graveyard; both dark and gloomy. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jack Carlson spent time sitting at different graves and reading the names on the grave. Carlson found and studied many graves dedicated to veterans. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jack Carlson spent time sitting at different graves and reading the names on the grave. Carlson found and studied many graves dedicated to veterans. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Krause and Bergh, along with sophomores Jake Ostrovitz and Alex Beckman, study a grave. The students and teachers talked about the different engravings about the person that passed. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Krause and Bergh, along with sophomores Jake Ostrovitz and Alex Beckman, study a grave. The students and teachers talked about the different engravings about the person that passed. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomores Damian Palmer, Will Kannengeiser, and Briant Bradley examine a grave located at the cemetery. Palmer, Kannengeiser, and Bradley walked around to look at multiple graves in search for sunken gravestones that the teachers wanted students to find. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Damian Palmer, Will Kannengeiser, and Briant Bradley examine a grave located at the cemetery. Palmer, Kannengeiser, and Bradley walked around to look at multiple graves in search for sunken gravestones that the teachers wanted students to find. Credit: Cassandra for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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8th grade English class reviews for upcoming MCAS

 

Eighth grade English teacher Vidula Plante is currently preparing her students for the upcoming MCAS testing. Recently, her class gained a new teaching assistant who teaches alongside her.

The class’s student teacher helps by further explaining the objective of the activity. The student teacher’s name is Mrs. Elston and she is a graduate student in the Salem State Graduate School of Education Master’s program. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
The class’s student teacher helps by further explaining the objective of the activity. The student teacher’s name is Jessica Elston and she is a graduate student in the Salem State Graduate School of Education Master’s program. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Another writing assignment the eighth graders recently had was an optional writing contest. In the contest, the students would enter “letters” to their favorite author, dead or alive. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Another writing assignment the eighth graders recently had was an optional writing contest. In the contest, the students would enter “letters” to their favorite author, dead or alive. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
The eighth grade students divided themselves into four corners based on what grade, on a scale of 1 to 4, they gave the response. They then debated their reasons as they tried to persuade other students to adopt their score.  Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
The eighth grade students divided themselves into four corners based on what grade, on a scale of 1 to 4, they gave the response. They then debated their reasons as they tried to persuade other students to adopt their score.
Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students listen attentively as Plante explains a mini exercise to the class. Plante and Elston asked for volunteers to go up to the board and find important information on how to tell if it was a well written response. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students listen attentively as Plante explains a mini exercise to the class. Plante and Elston asked for volunteers to go up to the board and find important information on how to tell if it was a well written response. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Plante explains the review activity to her class. Based on how the eighth graders scored each sample open response they would go to a certain spot in the room and explain why they graded the essay that way. The students were graded based on their participation. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Plante explains the review activity to her class. Based on how the eighth graders scored each sample open response they would go to a certain spot in the room and explain why they graded the essay that way. The students were graded based on their participation. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Eighth grader Laura Hannafin takes out her homework assignment from the night before. Plante assigned her students to read over an open response question and answer from a previous years MCAS. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Eighth grader Laura Hannafin takes out her homework assignment from the night before. Plante assigned her students to read over an open response question and answer from a previous years MCAS. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Margaret McFadden eagerly raises her hand to share her opinion on the sample open response. Students are highly encouraged to participate in this activity. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Margaret McFadden eagerly raises her hand to share her opinion on the sample open response. Students are highly encouraged to participate in this activity. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Students Lake Fleming, Sam Demeo, and Connor Coale follow the teacher’s instructions to take out a paper they received in a previous class. Because of the upcoming MCAS test Plante prepared her students by giving them sample open responses. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students Lake Fleming, Sam Demeo, and Connor Coale follow the teacher’s instructions to take out a paper they received in a previous class. Because of the upcoming MCAS test Plante prepared her students by giving them sample open responses. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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