Moth Lab Explains Evolution

Tuesday march 24th students in Biology teacher Erica Everett’s B block class worked together on a lab on evolution and natural selection. Students filled out a chart afterward on how peppered moths work with Darwin’s Theory on Evolution.

Students work together in pairs on the peppered moth lab, about Charles Darwin’s theory of Natural Selection. Sophomores Cole Bourbon and Evan Williams review  their papers for instructions, and then perform the lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students work together in pairs on the peppered moth lab, about Charles Darwin’s theory of Natural Selection. Sophomores Cole Bourbon and Evan Williams review their papers for instructions, and then perform the lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Erica Everett explains to students the objective of the lab. Students were given a piece of  “dark bark” and a piece of “light bark.” Students had to blend both light and dark moths onto the given piece of paper, and decide which ones were easiest to see. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Erica Everett explains to students the objective of the lab. Students were given a piece of “dark bark” and a piece of “light bark.” Students had to blend both light and dark moths onto the given piece of paper, and decide which ones were easiest to see. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Elizabeth Eichenburger prepares the bins with the materials students need. Each bin contains a dark piece of paper (dark bark) , with dark cut outs (moths), and a light piece of paper (light bark) with light cut outs  (moths). Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Elizabeth Eichenburger prepares the bins with the materials students need. Each bin contains a dark piece of paper (dark bark) , with dark cut outs (moths), and a light piece of paper (light bark) with light cut outs (moths). Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students also filled out a packet of surveys during their lab. Sophomores Jacob Callahan and Liam Martin work together on answering the fill in the blank sentences, on what they have learned in their lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students also filled out a packet of surveys during their lab. Sophomores Jacob Callahan and Liam Martin work together on answering the fill in the blank sentences, on what they have learned in their lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett writes a chart on Darwin’s Theory, and students filled in the blank spaces on the bottom. The chart consisted of Genetic Variation, over production, the struggle for existence, different reproductive success, and the definition of evolution. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett writes a chart on Darwin’s Theory, and students filled in the blank spaces on the bottom. The chart consisted of Genetic Variation, over production, the struggle for existence, different reproductive success, and the definition of evolution. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the worksheet students filled in blank spaces with the correct answers. Students drew a food chain of grass to moths and then to birds. Birds eat moths and moths eat grass. The worksheets were about the industrial revolution and how it rapidly changed the evolution of light moths to dark moths. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
On the worksheet students filled in blank spaces with the correct answers. Students drew a food chain of grass to moths and then to birds. Birds eat moths and moths eat grass. The worksheets were about the industrial revolution and how it rapidly changed the evolution of light moths to dark moths. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The chart on natural selection given as a rubric to students. Students created their own and filled in facts that they learned during this lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The chart on natural selection given as a rubric to students. Students created their own and filled in facts that they learned during this lab. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Martin fills out the back page of the worksheet, with facts on the trends he saw with the surviving moths. The chart  had the original number of moths for the light  on dark wood, and the dark on dark wood. Students over time had to decide which color moth had a better chance of surving on a specific color bark. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Martin fills out the back page of the worksheet, with facts on the trends he saw with the surviving moths. The chart had the original number of moths for the light on dark wood, and the dark on dark wood. Students over time had to decide which color moth had a better chance of surving on a specific color bark. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Light moths on dark bark were much more visible than the dark moths on the dark bark. Students used a pair of forceps to pick off the more visible moths in only a quick amount of time. The forceps were considered to be birds, because birds prey on moths.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Light moths on dark bark were much more visible than the dark moths on the dark bark. Students used a pair of forceps to pick off the more visible moths in only a quick amount of time. The forceps were considered to be birds, because birds prey on moths. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Ann Landry speaks to students about the directions of the project. Confirmed by Everett, students were asked to fill out the questions with as much detail as they could put into their answers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Co- Teacher Ann Landry speaks to students about the directions of the project. Confirmed by Everett, students were asked to fill out the questions with as much detail as they could put into their answers. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Emily Dahlen uses forceps to pick and choose which moths to take off of her page of bark. The lighter moths are a lot more visible than the darker ones seen on the page. Credit: Jenny Beardsley  for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Emily Dahlen uses forceps to pick and choose which moths to take off of her page of bark. The lighter moths are a lot more visible than the darker ones seen on the page. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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