Bio students perform dialysis tubing lab

Erica Everett’s honors biology class study dialysis tubing with a selectively permeable membrane.  The objective of this lab was to understand the effects of semi-permeability.

Students open the dialysis tubing in order to be able to insert a starch and water mixture.  The dialysis tubing has a selectively-permeable membrane, which means it can control which molecules can enter through its specifically-sized pores.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students open the dialysis tubing in order to be able to insert a starch and water mixture. The dialysis tubing has a selectively-permeable membrane, which means it can control which molecules can enter through its specifically-sized pores. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy pours a mixture of water and starch into the dialysis tubing.  Since starch molecules are relatively large, the molecules cannot fit through the small pores in the membrane of the tubing and the starch remains in the tubing.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy pours a mixture of water and starch into the dialysis tubing. Since starch molecules are relatively large, the molecules cannot fit through the small pores in the membrane of the tubing and the starch remains in the tubing. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students wash off the exterior of the sealed dialysis tubing to get rid of excess starch.  To display the full effect of selective permeability, the starch must be contained within the tubing.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students wash off the exterior of the sealed dialysis tubing to get rid of excess starch. To display the full effect of selective permeability, the starch must be contained within the tubing. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students put a few drops of iodine in their beaker of water.  Iodine enters the tubing because its molecules are small enough to flow through the tubing’s membrane.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students put a few drops of iodine in their beaker of water. Iodine enters the tubing because its molecules are small enough to flow through the tubing’s membrane. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students place the sealed dialysis tubing in the water and iodine mixture.  The iodine slowly enters the tubing through the membrane to reach an equilibrium, which means that there will be the same concentration of iodine in the tubing and the water outside.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students place the sealed dialysis tubing in the water and iodine mixture. The iodine slowly enters the tubing through the membrane to reach an equilibrium, which means that there will be the same concentration of iodine in the tubing and the water outside. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

The next day, the iodine has entered the tubing, and has reacted with the starch to make it a dark blue coloring.  A molecule in starch called amylose is responsible for the change in color when iodine mixes with it.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The next day, the iodine has entered the tubing, and has reacted with the starch to make it a dark blue coloring. A molecule in starch called amylose is responsible for the change in color when iodine mixes with it. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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High School Photo Class Makes Stencils

Students in Caroline Epp’s photo class got the opportunity to make a stencil. Everyone chose a picture and would print it would to make a stencil.

The paints came in a pack of ten. If a student wanted a color they would then get a paper plate and squeeze a bit of paint out. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia OnlineThe paints came in a pack of ten. If a student wanted a color they would then get a paper plate and squeeze a bit of paint out. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students gathered around the table to work on their stencils. Each student used a different picture like animals, someone famous, or even a random person. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia OnlineStudents gathered around the table to work on their stencils. Each student used a different picture like animals, someone famous, or even a random person. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Eden Silag Stearns, cuts the extra paper off with an Exado knife. Students taped the drawing paper on the back of the stencil while they cut the picture out. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Eden Silag Stearns, cuts the extra paper off with an Exado knife. Students taped the drawing paper on the back of the stencil while they cut the picture out. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Gillian Winn decided to stencil a panda. Students could use many different colors like black, purple, red, or blue. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Gillian Winn decided to stencil a panda. Students could use many different colors like black, purple, red, or blue. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

 

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Advisory Groups Create Hand Turkeys

To finish the half day before Thanksgiving, four sophomore advisory groups gathered in art teacher Caroline Epp’s room to make Thanksgiving-inspired artwork.

Art teacher Caroline Epp instructs sophomores how to make hand turkeys.  Epp states that art has therapeutic value, and after a stressful fall, the students had a deserved opportunity to have fun and bond with each other.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Art teacher Caroline Epp instructs sophomores how to make hand turkeys. Epp states that art has therapeutic value, and after a stressful fall, the students had a deserved opportunity to have fun and bond with each other. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores gather materials to make their turkeys.  The students used a variety of methods and materials to make their own unique creations.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores gather materials to make their turkeys. The students used a variety of methods and materials to make their own unique creations. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker, Amber Paré, Jenny Duff, and Julia Potter trace their hands in preparation for cutting out the shape.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker, Amber Paré, Jenny Duff, and Julia Potter trace their hands in preparation for cutting out the shape. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Marco Kaper outlines his hand with marker for his turkey.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Marco Kaper outlines his hand with marker for his turkey. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Axel Fougere cuts out his hand tracing.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Axel Fougere cuts out his hand tracing. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Niamh Dalton, Eden Silag-Stearns, and Gillian Winn cut out their turkeys.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Niamh Dalton, Eden Silag-Stearns, and Gillian Winn cut out their turkeys. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bridgett Kiernan’s turkey.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Bridgett Kiernan’s turkey. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Santana Tosi’s and Axel Fougere’s turkeys.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Santana Tosi’s and Axel Fougere’s turkeys. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Jenny Duff and Julia Potter’s turkey.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Jenny Duff and Julia Potter’s turkey. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker’s and Amber Paré’s turkeys.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Emily Parker’s and Amber Paré’s turkeys. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Health students present information about dangers and effects of drugs

Eric Magers’ health class presents their powerpoints about their assigned drugs.  Students worked in partners or groups of three to answer assigned questions about two or more drugs in their presentations.

Sophomores Julia Przesiek and Emily Dahlen and freshman Jane Grady present about Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta.  Adderall is used primarily to treat ADHD, and it should not be used without a prescription.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Julia Przesiek and Emily Dahlen and freshman Jane Grady present about Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta. Adderall is used primarily to treat ADHD, and it should not be used without a prescription. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Madeleine Conway and Amber Paré inform the class about inhalants, whippets, adrenalin, and morphine.  While adrenalin is naturally in the body and morphine is used to treat severe pain, inhalants/whippets are used for a quick high with no medical benefits.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Madeleine Conway and Amber Paré inform the class about inhalants, whippets, adrenalin, and morphine. While adrenalin is naturally in the body and morphine is used to treat severe pain, inhalants/whippets are used for a quick high with no medical benefits. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Joseph Cirone explains steroids and GHB to the class.  Both drugs are often illegal when used to improve athletic performance.  For medical uses, GHB can be used as an anesthetic and steroids have a wide range of uses.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Joseph Cirone explains steroids and GHB to the class. Both drugs are often illegal when used to improve athletic performance. For medical uses, GHB can be used as an anesthetic and steroids have a wide range of uses. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Avery Shaw and Freshman Christian Hadaegh educate their peers about cough medication and Xanax.  Xanax is used as an antidepressant, and cough medicine is not only used for coughing, but it is also abused and can be addictive.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Avery Shaw and Freshman Christian Hadaegh educate their peers about cough medication and Xanax. Xanax is used as an antidepressant, and cough medicine is not only used for coughing, but it is also abused and can be addictive. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Nathaniel Rautio and Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Louis Masella describe Psilocybin mushrooms and desomorphine, or Krokodil.  Krokodil is composed of codeine, alcohol, gasoline, red phosphorus, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and paint thinner; it is known as a flesh-eating drug due to its large amount of tissue damage/infection.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Nathaniel Rautio and Sophomores Samuel Prudden and Louis Masella describe Psilocybin mushrooms and desomorphine, or Krokodil. Krokodil is composed of codeine, alcohol, gasoline, red phosphorus, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and paint thinner; it is known as a flesh-eating drug due to its large amount of tissue damage/infection. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tomaz Tofuri and Anthony Brazzo tell the class about marijuana and synthetic marijuana.  Synthetic marijuana, or spice, is a mixture of dried plant material and dangerous chemical additives which cause psychoactive effects.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tomaz Tofuri and Anthony Brazzo tell the class about marijuana and synthetic marijuana. Synthetic marijuana, or spice, is a mixture of dried plant material and dangerous chemical additives which cause psychoactive effects. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robert Sarmanian and Jared Zaval introduce information about cocaine, crack, and PCP.  Crack is a type of cocaine that must be smoked because of its rough, rocky texture, and PCP is also known Angel Dust, which can cause psychotic side effects.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Robert Sarmanian and Jared Zaval introduce information about cocaine, crack, and PCP. Crack is a type of cocaine that must be smoked because of its rough, rocky texture, and PCP is also known Angel Dust, which can cause psychotic side effects. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Samantha Booma and Randall Doane display their knowledge about crystal meth and bath salts.  Bath salts are not what their name suggests; they are actually synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines.  Because of the resulting hallucinations and violent behavior, bath salts are known in media as the zombie drug.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshmen Samantha Booma and Randall Doane display their knowledge about crystal meth and bath salts. Bath salts are not what their name suggests; they are actually synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines. Because of the resulting hallucinations and violent behavior, bath salts are known in media as the zombie drug. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Abigail Roundy and Frederick Spofford show their research on LSD and alcohol.   LSD produces anxiety, paranoia, and delusions.   Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Ethan Ketchum and Matthew Kenney give their presentation to the class about research chemicals. Although these chemicals are sometimes sold outside of medicine’s legislation to people as psychoactive drugs, they are meant for laboratory use only and are not intended for human use. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

Sophomores Ethan Ketchum and Matthew Kenney give their presentation to the class about research chemicals.  Although these chemicals are sometimes sold outside of medicine’s legislation to people as psychoactive drugs, they are meant for laboratory use only and are not intended for human use.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Abigail Roundy and Frederick Spofford show their research on LSD and alcohol. LSD produces anxiety, paranoia, and delusions. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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UPCOMING EVENTS: Winter Music Performances

The band, chorus, and a Capella group SoundWaves have several upcoming performances.

 

Dec. 5th  –   Essex Holiday Festival – 6:00 PM -Essex Shipyard – SoundWaves

Dec. 7th  –   Manchester Friendship Tree Lighting- 3:30PM – First Parish Church – Band, Chorus and SW

Dec. 12th – A Cappella Concert for Ebola Aid – 7:30 PM –  First Church UCC – Ipswich – SoundWaves

Dec. 13th – Council On Aging Luncheon –  Band and Chorus and/or SoundWaves

Dec. 18th – WINTER CONCERT!  7:30 PM – High School Auditorium  featuring Band, Chorus and SoundWaves

Dec. 22nd –  Beverly Rehabilitation Facility – 3:30 – SoundWaves

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Bio students study eukaryotic cells

Erica Everett’s honors biology class used compound microscopes to view onion cells, potato cells, and skin cells.  The students made their own slides from materials given to them, and they replicated what they saw through the microscope on paper, identifying certain parts of each cell.

Students slice potatoes to place on slides, and shortly afterwards they place onto the potato slices drops of iodine which turns starch blue-black.  The pieces had to be extremely thin so that light could pass through and individual cells could be visible.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students slice potatoes to place on slides, and shortly afterwards they place onto the potato slices drops of iodine which turns starch blue-black. The pieces had to be extremely thin so that light could pass through and individual cells could be visible. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students add a drop of methylene blue stain to skin cells to be able to distinguish individual cells and their organelles.  To obtain these cells, students softly scraped the inside of their cheeks with toothpicks and rubbed the toothpick on empty slides.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students add a drop of methylene blue stain to skin cells to be able to distinguish individual cells and their organelles. To obtain these cells, students softly scraped the inside of their cheeks with toothpicks and rubbed the toothpick on empty slides. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Wolf Hahn slices an onion to obtain an extremely thin slice to put on an empty slide.  The slice had to be from the epidermis of the onion because of epidermal cells’ simple structure and transparency.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Wolf Hahn slices an onion to obtain an extremely thin slice to put on an empty slide. The slice had to be from the epidermis of the onion because of epidermal cells’ simple structure and transparency. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Courtney Holley and Bridgett Kiernan adjust the focus on their microscopes to identify the small organelles in each cell.  The students drew the cells on paper according to what they saw through the microscope and   labeled certain organelles.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Courtney Holley and Bridgett Kiernan adjust the focus on their microscopes to identify the small organelles in each cell. The students drew the cells on paper according to what they saw through the microscope and labeled certain organelles. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp studies a potato cell under his microscope.  The students learned about leucoplasts in potato cells which store the cell’s starch.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp studies a potato cell under his microscope. The students learned about leucoplasts in potato cells which store the cell’s starch. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy attach their slides on the stage of the microcope and study the intricate details.  The students were in groups of two, starting off with one partner observing potato cells and the other partner observing skin cells.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy attach their slides on the stage of the microcope and study the intricate details. The students were in groups of two, starting off with one partner observing potato cells and the other partner observing skin cells. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy examines her cheek skin cell.  The students were instructed to start studying the cell with a low power magnification to locate the cells on their slides, and then to increase the magnification to be able to see the cells and some of their individual parts.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy examines her cheek skin cell. The students were instructed to start studying the cell with a low power magnification to locate the cells on their slides, and then to increase the magnification to be able to see the cells and some of their individual parts. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Soucy draws a picture of the cells she can see through her microscope.  The students were told to identify the magnification that they used; low power is 10x, medium power is 100x, and high power is 400x with the specific microscopes that were used.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Soucy draws a picture of the cells she can see through her microscope. The students were told to identify the magnification that they used; low power is 10x, medium power is 100x, and high power is 400x with the specific microscopes that were used. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

An epidermal onion cell is magnified through a microscope.  The faint lines around each cell are the cell walls, which protect the cells and add structural support.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
An epidermal onion cell is magnified through a microscope. The faint lines around each cell are the cell walls, which protect the cells and add structural support. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Students Glaze Clay Plates

7th grade students near completion with their first ceramic project of the year. They made clay plates with mythological sea creatures serving as the focal point of the design in art teacher Tamera Burns’ class.

Burns helps students decide on the two colors they want for their clay plates. She tells students to dip the plates in the buckets quickly, submerging only half of the plate. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Burns helps students decide on the two colors they want for their clay plates. She tells students to dip the plates in the buckets quickly, submerging only half of the plate. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students designed their clay pieces after mythological sea creatures. Two plates dry on the table after being dip-dyed.  The class has been collectively working on this assignment for a couple months. Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students designed their clay pieces after mythological sea creatures. Two plates dry on the table after being dip-glazed. The class has been collectively working on this assignment for a couple months. Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The 7th graders had the option of choosing a maximum of two colors to die their clay pieces. Popular color choices included opal and mottled blue. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The 7th graders had the option of choosing a maximum of two colors to glaze their clay pieces. Popular color choices included opal and mottled blue. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Prior to the dip-dying stage for the clay, Burns presented the class with a power point presentation about water mythology. This inspired the students on how they should design their sea creatures. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Prior to the glazing stage for the clay, Burns presented the class with a power point presentation about water mythology. This inspired the students on how they should design their sea creatures. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Art teacher Tamera Burns helps 7th grade students dye their clay plates. This was the students first time handling clay and completing their first assignment. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Art teacher Tamera Burns helps 7th grade students glaze their clay plates. This was the students first time handling clay and completing their first assignment. Credit: Courtney Fraser for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Spaulding Education Fund Hosts A Night of Stars

On Sunday November 23, A Night of Stars was hosted in the auditorium. This show is presented by The Spaulding Education Fund, which has been providing grants to boost student achievement in core subjects for twenty five years. There were two performances that showcased the talent from elementary school to high school students in the community.

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As the audience was filing into the auditorium, a slideshow was playing in order to show what the Spaulding Education Fund has done for the Manchester Essex School District in the past twenty five years. In the science department, Spaulding has given three 3D printers that have opened up new creative possibilities for classes like robotics and industrial design. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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This year, the Master of Ceremonies was sophomore Robert Carter, who introduced each act with interesting facts about them. Carter also performed in both shows with the Soundwaves. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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The Soundwaves performed “That Lonesome Road” and “No Rain” in both shows. Many of the Soundwaves members helped English teacher Liz Edgerton out backstage and some even had an act in one of the shows. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Sixth graders Maddie Lawler and Sami Turner showed off their gymnastic skills in the second show to the song “Bounce.” Both girls take lessons at Iron Rail Gymnastics Academy in Wenham and have been there for a while. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Elementary student Luli Bartlett sang “Eleanor Rigby” while playing her guitar. Written by the Beatles, “Eleanor Rigby” was released in 1966 and won a Grammy for best contemporary performance in 1967. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Eighth graders Emma Lacey and Anna Bonaccorso, with Ava Glass on bongos, sang “Runaway” by Ed Sheeran in the second show. The acts were split up into two shows so that more students could perform. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Thespina Parianos, Abby Lantz, and Bella Pomeroy sang “Riptide” by Vance Joy along with Thad Fulmer on guitar and Kendall Hersey on drums. This is the first time that this group of eighth graders has performed together and they have been asked to be another fundraising show coming up soon. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Hersey, the bands drummer, has never been in A Night of Stars before but has been drumming since the age of three and wants to continue for as long as he can. He takes lessons in Essex with James Murphy at Stix Drum Instruction. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Seventh grade student Jenna Cirella sang “All Too Well” accompanied by chorus director Donna O’Neill on piano. O’Neill also played piano for sixth grader Aoife Dalton in the first show and has been accompanying singers in the performances for many years. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Catherine Garlitz and Molly Brady, both seventh graders, showcased their tap skills in a duet to “Barbapapa’s Groove.” “Barbapapa’s Groove,” written and performed by the Barbatuques, was released in 2002. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Garlitz and Brady take dance lessons at Liza’s Studio in Beverly and have been dancing together there. The girls compete in weekend dance competitions all around the country. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Junior Chelsea Rose sings “Vienna” by Billy Joel, accompanied by junior Sara Rhuda. Rose dedicated her song in honor of her friend Andrew Rennie. Along with singing in the show like she does every year, Rose also participated in the backstage crew with her fellow drama members. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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To close both shows, the Irish step dancing group from North Beverly danced a Treble Reel. A Treble Reel is a traditional dance done in hard shoes to 4/4 time. Every year these dancers showcase their skill in Irish step. Credit: Kara Hersey for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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