Bio students study microscopes

Erica Everett’s honors biology students receive two different types of microscopes and learn the parts and functions of them.

Biology teacher Erica Everett describes the main differences between the dissecting microscope and the compound microscope.  While dissecting microscopes can be used with relatively thick specimen, the compound microscope has to be used with thin slides so that light can pass through.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Erica Everett describes the main differences between the dissecting microscope and the compound microscope. While dissecting microscopes can be used with relatively thick specimen, the compound microscope has to be used with thin slides so that light can pass through. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a dissecting microscope to the class.  Everett stresses the importance of carrying microscopes while supporting the base with one hand in case the base is not properly attached.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a dissecting microscope to the class. Everett stresses the importance of carrying microscopes while supporting the base with one hand in case the base is not properly attached. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a compound microscope, also known as a light microscope because of its reliance on visible light.  With the light microscope, one can view living things and their processes.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Everett displays a compound microscope, also known as a light microscope because of its reliance on visible light. With the light microscope, one can view living things and their processes. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy become familiar with a dissecting microscope.  The students were told to research the parts of the microscope while they observed them to gain a further understanding.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy become familiar with a dissecting microscope. The students were told to research the parts of the microscope while they observed them to gain a further understanding. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp observes the functions of a light microscope.  Light microscopes have three objectives, which are high magnification, medium magnification, and low magnification, and they rotate so the observer can use the level of magnification necessary to view the specimen.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp observes the functions of a light microscope. Light microscopes have three objectives, which are high magnification, medium magnification, and low magnification, and they rotate so the observer can use the level of magnification necessary to view the specimen. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Julia Prziek researches the light microscope.  The light microscope has a light source below the platform to put specimen on-commonly known as a stage-and this light goes through a hole in the platform called a diaphragm.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Julia Prziek researches the light microscope. The light microscope has a light source below the platform to put specimen on-commonly known as a stage-and this light goes through a hole in the platform called a diaphragm. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feuerbach study the focusing controls on their compound microscope.  There are two knobs: the coarse focus, which moves the lenses closer and further from the specimen, and the fine focus, which makes more intricate focus adjustments.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feuerbach study the focusing controls on their compound microscope. There are two knobs: the coarse focus, which moves the lenses closer and further from the specimen, and the fine focus, which makes more intricate focus adjustments. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Hannah Soucy draws a diagram of the parts of a dissecting microscope.  Dissecting microscopes have one main focus knob which brings the objectives closer to the stage.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah Soucy draws a diagram of the parts of a dissecting microscope. Dissecting microscopes have one main focus knob which brings the objectives closer to the stage. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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