Biology students study plant adaptations

Science teacher Erica Everett’s honors biology class conducts a lab to further their understanding of plants and their adaptations to abiotic factors.

Students receive sheets with instructions, as well as questions to answer as they went through the lab.  The specimens of plants that they studied were lichens, conifer branches, and deciduous branches.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students receive sheets with instructions, as well as questions to answer as they went through the lab. The specimens of plants that they studied were lichens, conifer branches, and deciduous branches. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students were asked to test the flexibility of conifer branches.  These branches are flexible so that they can hold the weight of snow, and are coated with wax so that they will not dry out.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students were asked to test the flexibility of conifer branches. These branches are flexible so that they can hold the weight of snow, and are coated with wax so that they will not dry out. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy compared the flexibility of the conifer branches to the deciduous branches.  They found that the deciduous branches were much less flexible because they had no need to make that adaption to survive in their environment.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Santana Tosi and Hannah Soucy compared the flexibility of the conifer branches to the deciduous branches. They found that the deciduous branches were much less flexible because they had no need to make that adaption to survive in their environment. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feuerbach studied the texture of their lichen.  Lichens are adapted in their environment to dry out and rehydrate when rain comes, so that they can survive even in dry seasons.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Jake Brugger and Spencer Feuerbach studied the texture of their lichen. Lichens are adapted in their environment to dry out and rehydrate when rain comes, so that they can survive even in dry seasons. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp places his lichen in water and studies the changes that occur.  The lichen rehydrates and turns green so that it can start to function again.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Connor Kapp places his lichen in water and studies the changes that occur. The lichen rehydrates and turns green so that it can start to function again. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students watch the elephant ear lichen as the changes start to occur.  Not only does its color change, but the lichen’s texture changes from dry and brittle to a similar texture to seaweed.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students watch the elephant ear lichen as the changes start to occur. Not only does its color change, but the lichen’s texture changes from dry and brittle to a similar texture to seaweed. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

After finishing the lab, students research the reasons why trees lose their leaves in the fall.  This process is due to trees needing to conserve their limited energy and resources during winter.  Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After finishing the lab, students research the reasons why trees lose their leaves in the fall. This process is due to trees needing to conserve their limited energy and resources during winter. Credit: Lillian Schrafft for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

(0)