Physics class experiments with lenses

Philip Logsdon’s freshman Physics first class conducted a lab in which they use lenses to find the focal lengths of real or virtual images. The students were broken up into lab groups containing 3-5 people.

Students Fritz Spofford and Mac McCoy listen attentively as Logsdon explains how to adjust their convex lens. It was very important for the students to adjust the lens the proper length in order for the lab to work correctly. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students Fritz Spofford and Mac McCoy listen attentively as Logsdon explains how to adjust their convex lens. It was very important for the students to adjust the lens the proper length in order for the lab to work correctly. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Grace Dawson compares information with fellow lab partner Jillian Furber. As the two conversed, the other members of their group continued to write down their observations. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Grace Dawson compares information with fellow lab partner Jillian Furber. As the two conversed, the other members of their group continued to write down their observations. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Group members Fritz Spofford, Mac McCoy, and Louis Masella complete their lab before the rest of the class has finished. Convex lenses are lenses that have surfaces that curve outward and concave lenses have surfaces that curve inward. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Group members Fritz Spofford, Mac McCoy, and Louis Masella complete their lab before the rest of the class has finished. Convex lenses are lenses that have surfaces that curve outward and concave lenses have surfaces that curve inward. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Depending on where the lens was located the image would appear differently on the notecard in which it was projected. The source of light (and the image they were projecting) was a lit candle. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Depending on where the lens was located the image would appear differently on the notecard in which it was projected. The source of light (and the image they were projecting) was a lit candle. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Nellie Boling adjusts her notecard as instructed by Logsdon. The distance of the notecard to the lens where the image was in focus is called the focal length. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Nellie Boling adjusts her notecard as instructed by Logsdon. The distance of the notecard to the lens where the image was in focus is called the focal length. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students with long hair were given instructions to pull back their hair as a safety precaution. This was important regarding safety because they would be using a flame in their experiment. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students with long hair were given instructions to pull back their hair as a safety precaution. This was important regarding safety because they would be using a flame in their experiment. Credit: Phoebe Savje for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Sophomores Test Muscle Fatigue

Sophomore biology class conducts a lab consisting of the study of muscle fatigue. Biology teacher Maria Burgess chose this lab to show her students how a repeated motion in the muscle can cause exhaustion throughout the body.

Biology teacher Maria Burgess encourages sophomore Zack Even while he squeezes a pump with his hand. The repeated motion of squeezing the pump caused fatigue in whichever muscle was being used. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Biology teacher Maria Burgess encourages sophomore Zack Even while he squeezes a pump with his hand. The repeated motion of squeezing the pump caused fatigue in whichever muscle was being used. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class separates into groups for the lab. Teacher Maria Burgess separated students by using popsicle sticks with each student’s name on them. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The class separates into groups for the lab. Teacher Maria Burgess separated students by using popsicle sticks with each student’s name on them. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ben Wolseiffer observes Phelan as he completes a trial using his hand. In this lab, there were three “testers”, and the students compared the results to one another in order to observe the decrease in productivity over time. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ben Wolseiffer observes Phelan as he completes a trial using his hand. In this lab, there were three “testers”, and the students compared the results to one another in order to observe the decrease in productivity over time. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore James Marshall uses his humerus to squeeze the pump while sophomore Jarrod Young counts each time the flap lifts up. Each time the humerus bends back and forth, the sarcomere shortens and relaxes the muscle, causing contraction. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore James Marshall uses his humerus to squeeze the pump while sophomore Jarrod Young counts each time the flap lifts up. Each time the humerus bends back and forth, the sarcomere shortens and relaxes the muscle, causing contraction. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Even and Julia Mitrano count the number of times their teammate can squeeze the pump using their muscles attached to the humerus, or the arm muscle, within the span of one minute. The red flap on top of the pump system lifts up to indicate when the pump is being squeezed. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Even and Julia Mitrano count the number of times their teammate can squeeze the pump using their muscles attached to the humerus, or the arm muscle, within the span of one minute. The red flap on top of the pump system lifts up to indicate when the pump is being squeezed. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Burgess assists sophomore James Phelan by readjusting the pump in preparation for the lab. This lab focused on the use of the skeletal muscles in the body, which are voluntary muscles since they can be controlled consciously. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Burgess assists sophomore James Phelan by readjusting the pump in preparation for the lab. This lab focused on the use of the skeletal muscles in the body, which are voluntary muscles since they can be controlled consciously. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
 Sophomore Molly Lynch uses her tibia (the calf bone) and her femur (the thigh bone) to see how many times she can squeeze the pump in one minute. Fatigue was exemplified through the results that the students recorded during the trials of the hand, arm, and leg muscles. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Molly Lynch uses her tibia (the calf bone) and her femur (the thigh bone) to see how many times she can squeeze the pump in one minute. Fatigue was exemplified through the results that the students recorded during the trials of the hand, arm, and leg muscles. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jarrod Young answers the questions at the end of the lab. Each group collectively answered questions according to their evidence. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Jarrod Young answers the questions at the end of the lab. Each group collectively answered questions according to their evidence. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz and Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Freshman advisory groups discuss ethics and values

The high school advisory program allows students to meet in their advisory programs about once a month to discuss different topics that relate to issues both in and out of school. The topic for this week’s freshman discussion was ethics and morals.

Prior to a full-group discussion, students wrote down their own definitions of ethics and values. The group later defined ethics as “a relative morale perspective of what a person thinks is good or bad.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Prior to a full-group discussion, students wrote down their own definitions of ethics and values. The group later defined ethics as “a relative morale perspective of what a person thinks is good or bad.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Emily Stanton makes changes to her definition of ethics so that it included the words “moral” and “good or bad”. After writing in their journals, students viewed a video that showed how different people define ethics. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Emily Stanton makes changes to her definition of ethics so that it included the words “moral” and “good or bad”. After writing in their journals, students viewed a video that showed how different people define ethics. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Maria Burgess converses with students about why it is important to have morals and how ethics can vary from person to person. The advisory group later viewed a video reading of a poem titled “Travelling Through the Dark” and discussed possible views of ethics that were related to it. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Advisor Maria Burgess converses with students about why it is important to have morals and how ethics can vary from person to person. The advisory group later viewed a video reading of a poem titled “Travelling Through the Dark” and discussed possible views of ethics that were related to it. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students listen as the class begins a debate about possible views of ethics. Advisor Maria Burgess proposed this question for the class to debate: “If fifteen people on a boat that could only hold twelve, what do you think should happen?” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students listen as the class begins a debate about possible views of ethics. Advisor Maria Burgess proposed this question for the class to debate: “If fifteen people on a boat that could only hold twelve, what do you think should happen?” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Annabelle Haskell listens to Brian Carlson talk about ethics and morals. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would listen and learn what is good and bad. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Annabelle Haskell listens to Brian Carlson talk about ethics and morals. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would listen and learn what is good and bad. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson goes into detail about what are good morals and good ethics. A moral is a lesson and figuring out between right and wrong. An ethic is a set of rules for people to follow.  Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson goes into detail about what are good morals and good ethics. A moral is a lesson and figuring out between right and wrong. An ethic is a set of rules for people to follow. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson had a sheet to guide him of situations of morals and ethics. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would give an answer after Carlson read the question. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Carlson had a sheet to guide him of situations of morals and ethics. Students in Carlson’s advisory class would give an answer after Carlson read the question. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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ASR student presents internship

On May 13th, Authentic Science Research student Peter Cottingham presented his project and internship on the invasive species Botrylloides violaceus, or more commonly known as the Orange Sheath Tunicate.  Cottingham talked about his experience while working with his internship, as well as the research he came up with.

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NHS discusses upcoming induction ceremony

On May 20th, members of the National Honors Society met in NHS advisor Maria Burgess’s room to discuss the upcoming induction ceremony. The ceremony is on May 27th and is held to induct new members of the NHS. All current members of NHS will participate in the ceremony.

 

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AP Environmental students perform age structure lab

During the week of May 19, the students in Erica Everett’s AP Environmental science class ventured into the nearby cemetery to receive data regarding the ages in which individuals passed away to help them construct an age structure.

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Seventh Grade Engineering Class Launches Bottle Rockets

Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx instructs the annual bottle rocket project with his seventh grade classes.  The students collected plastic bottles and transformed them into rockets by adding wings and tops.  The seventh graders then launched their bottles and recorded the data.

Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx draws examples of good and bad wing types for the students’ rockets.  Bannister-Marx explains that large, jagged wings are not as aerodynamic as small, straight ones. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Engineering teacher John Bannister-Marx draws examples of good and bad wing types for the students’ rockets. Bannister-Marx explains that large, jagged wings are not as aerodynamic as small, straight ones. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Jack Julien glue extra parts to their bottle in order to make it more durable.  Schwartz hot glues a piece of Styrofoam intending for it to be attached to the side of the rocket while Julien glues half of a foam football on top of the bottle. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Jack Julien glue extra parts to their bottle in order to make it more durable. Schwartz hot glues a piece of Styrofoam intending for it to be attached to the side of the rocket while Julien glues half of a foam football on top of the bottle. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students draw diagrams of what they want their bottle rockets to look like.  They use tennis balls and foam cones to protect the top of their bottle when it hits the ground after launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students draw diagrams of what they want their bottle rockets to look like. They use tennis balls and foam cones to protect the top of their bottle when it hits the ground after launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grader John Crehan researches effective bottle rockets.  The students were required to look up various types in order to figure out the most aerodynamic and durable kind of rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader John Crehan researches effective bottle rockets. The students were required to look up various types in order to figure out the most aerodynamic and durable kind of rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Many students cut tennis balls in half using a miniature hand saw and a clamp attached to the side of a table to hold it in place.  The seventh graders then attached them to the end of their rockets so that there would be less damage upon impact. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Many students cut tennis balls in half using a miniature hand saw and a clamp attached to the side of a table to hold it in place. The seventh graders then attached them to the end of their rockets so that there would be less damage upon impact. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A couple of days before the project began, students collected both 1 and 2 liter soda and seltzer bottles.  Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A couple of days before the project began, students collected both 1 and 2 liter soda and seltzer bottles. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the class waits on the sidelines as a team launches their rocket.  The students were responsible for measuring the angle of the rocket at its maximum height and the distance away from the launch pad in order to find the height that it flew. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The majority of the class waits on the sidelines as a team launches their rocket. The students were responsible for measuring the angle of the rocket at its maximum height and the distance away from the launch pad in order to find the height that it flew. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Emma Cochand and Clara Davis fix the broken wings of their rocket using duct tape before their initial launch.  Bannister-Marx assigned partnerships for this project who worked on their bottles for a few days before launching. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Emma Cochand and Clara Davis fix the broken wings of their rocket using duct tape before their initial launch. Bannister-Marx assigned partnerships for this project who worked on their bottles for a few days before launching. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Banister-Marx holds the base of the pump steady so the pressure of the water doesn’t move the base. The pump uses 80 units of water pressure to launch each rocket into the air. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Banister-Marx holds the base of the pump steady so the pressure of the water doesn’t move the base. The pump uses 80 units of water pressure to launch each rocket into the air. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Schwartz repairs his rocket after his group’s firs launch using duct tape to keep the wings intact. Each group were given sufficient time before each launch to prepare their rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Schwartz repairs his rocket after his group’s firs launch using duct tape to keep the wings intact. Each group were given sufficient time before each launch to prepare their rocket. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Ike Maloney records the height and distance of another team’s rocket as he prepares to launch his own rocket.  There were always one or two teams getting their rockets ready for flight as one team launches and the other teams wait on the sidelines. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Ike Maloney records the height and distance of another team’s rocket as he prepares to launch his own rocket. There were always one or two teams getting their rockets ready for flight as one team launches and the other teams wait on the sidelines. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before each launch, students filled their bottles about half way with water using funnels to not spill any water on the turf. The more pressure pumped into the rocket, the higher it will fly. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Before each launch, students filled their bottles about half way with water using funnels to not spill any water on the turf. The more pressure pumped into the rocket, the higher it will fly. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While one student pumps the water pressure into the rocket, the other student prepares to pull the string over their head to initiate the launch. This is the reason why Bannister-Marx split the groups into two, so that each student would have a role in the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
While one student pumps the water pressure into the rocket, the other student prepares to pull the string over their head to initiate the launch. This is the reason why Bannister-Marx split the groups into two, so that each student would have a role in the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Libby Graves pumps 80 units of pressure into the rocket. Graves and Bannister-Marx wear protective goggles in case anything goes wrong during the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Libby Graves pumps 80 units of pressure into the rocket. Graves and Bannister-Marx wear protective goggles in case anything goes wrong during the launch. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students typically used small, pointed wings to increase stability and height of their rockets.  They also used foam cones and tennis balls in order to make the bottles durable enough to endure multiple flights. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students typically used small, pointed wings to increase stability and height of their rockets. They also used foam cones and tennis balls in order to make the bottles durable enough to endure multiple flights. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After all of the teams launched their rockets twice, the students returned to the classroom and recorded the data of their best launch on the white board.  This was in order to compare the teams’ results to see whose rockets flew the highest. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After all of the teams launched their rockets twice, the students returned to the classroom and recorded the data of their best launch on the white board. This was in order to compare the teams’ results to see whose rockets flew the highest. Credit: Susie Buck and Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Stop Hunger Now Fundraiser hosted at Cape Ann Lanes

Seniors Alyssa Reeves and Paige Zaval host bowling night for their SCORE project. SCORE stands for “Senior Choice of Related Experience”, and during the last academic quarter, seniors complete a project of their choice, allowing them to explore a career that they may want to pursue in the future. Zaval and Reeves completed their SCORE project through fundraising for Global Issues class at Cape Ann Lanes.

Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Students contribute to Stop Hunger Now by bowling at Cape Ann Lanes. For fifteen dollars, people could bowl for three games from 6-9. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students contribute to Stop Hunger Now by bowling at Cape Ann Lanes. For fifteen dollars, people could bowl for three games from 6-9. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Breanna Arnold, Bailey Graves, and Meghan Conway compete against each other in a lane. Cape Ann Lanes uses candlepin style bowling at their lanes, which originates from Worcester, Massachusetts. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Juniors Breanna Arnold, Bailey Graves, and Meghan Conway compete against each other in a lane. Cape Ann Lanes uses candlepin style bowling at their lanes, which originates from Worcester, Massachusetts. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Maddie Dahlin and Fiona Davis purchase tickets from Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves. Additional donations were also made for Stop Hunger Now as well as the proceeds from the bowling rounds. Credit:  Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Maddie Dahlin and Fiona Davis purchase tickets from Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves. Additional donations were also made for Stop Hunger Now as well as the proceeds from the bowling rounds. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bailey Graves enters names for the round on the keyboard. In Candlepin style bowling, there are ten rounds in each game, which is often called a “string”. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bailey Graves enters names for the round on the keyboard. In Candlepin style bowling, there are ten rounds in each game, which is often called a “string”. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Isabella Hickey begins to approach the foul line for the second round of the game. The three step approach is the most common technique for candlepin style bowling, and the less shifting weight from each foot makes the delivery more productive. Credit:  Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Isabella Hickey begins to approach the foul line for the second round of the game. The three step approach is the most common technique for candlepin style bowling, and the less shifting weight from each foot makes the delivery more productive. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves sell tickets at the table during the fundraiser. The goal of 260 dollars was reached and exceeded by about forty dollars. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seniors Paige Zaval and Alyssa Reeves sell tickets at the table during the fundraiser. The goal of 260 dollars was reached and exceeded by about forty dollars. Credit: Molly Lynch for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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French class plays game to prepare for test

Foreign language teacher Erin Forunato’s freshman French class competed in a game that reviewed chapter material. Students were broken into groups, and took turns rolling dice to answer specific questions that corresponded with questions on a game board.

Students gather in teams as teacher Erin Fortunato explains how the game is played. Teams agreed on a magnet to represent them on the game board, which was projected on the class whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students gather in teams as teacher Erin Fortunato explains how the game is played. Teams agreed on a magnet to represent them on the game board, which was projected on the class whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Fortunato explains what categories can be landed on in the game. There were five symbols on the board that corresponded to categories in the game: translations, the imperfect tense, culture, vocabulary, and context situations. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Fortunato explains what categories can be landed on in the game. There were five symbols on the board that corresponded to categories in the game: translations, the imperfect tense, culture, vocabulary, and context situations. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
To determine who gets to roll the dice first, freshmen Annabelle Haskell and Lily Moore play rock paper scissors. Team members were required to take turns rolling the dice and answering questions that were asked. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
To determine who gets to roll the dice first, freshmen Annabelle Haskell and Lily Moore play rock paper scissors. Team members were required to take turns rolling the dice and answering questions that were asked. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman David LaForge rolls the die for his team. The number on the die when it was rolled determined how many spaces each team could move; if an answer was incorrect, the team would move back to their original spot. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman David LaForge rolls the die for his team. The number on the die when it was rolled determined how many spaces each team could move; if an answer was incorrect, the team would move back to their original spot. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A team collaborates on possible answers while freshman Julia Przesiek writes down their ideas. Whenever a student answered a question, he or she was not allowed to look at the written answer on the whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
A team collaborates on possible answers while freshman Julia Przesiek writes down their ideas. Whenever a student answered a question, he or she was not allowed to look at the written answer on the whiteboard. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Nellie Boling finishes up the game as she writes her final answer for a question about the imperfect tense. No teams were able to finish the entire game, which resulted in a five-way tie, so teacher Erin Fortunato decided to give them all candy on the test day. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Freshman Nellie Boling finishes up the game as she writes her final answer for a question about the imperfect tense. No teams were able to finish the entire game, which resulted in a five-way tie, so teacher Erin Fortunato decided to give them all candy on the test day. Credit: Amber Paré and Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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DECA students compete successfully in Georgia

From Friday May 2nd to Wednesday May 7th the Manchester Essex DECA team traveled to Atlanta Georgia to compete in the International Career Development Conference. MERHS DECA scored two of 18 individual exam or role play medals awarded to the 462 MASS DECA students at the competition.

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