Movie remakes ruin the original interpretation

In a 2012 interview, Joel Kinnaman, the star of 2014’s “Robocop” remake, stated that creating a reboot that could be labeled PG-13 would be a “huge mistake.”

But the shocking violence of the original film wasn’t present in the remake, and the film was in fact given a PG-13 rating.

While Samuel L. Jackson, another star of the film, insisted that the remake would have been rated R at the time when the original was released, the film nonetheless felt like an empty attempt to emulate the first film without truly adding anything of its own or even respecting the shockingly graphic imagery and controversial nature of the original.

Director José Padiliha stated that the movie was meant to be PG-13 so that it could appeal to the broadest possible audience; in other words, Padiliha’s remake had to make money, even if that meant sacrificing the integrity of the film.

Remakes are no longer made because filmmakers believe they can put a fresh spin on an old classic; instead, studios simply add updated special effects and reuse old stories just to make some easy money.

In 2013, theaters were loaded with remakes. Even acclaimed directors like Spike Lee (“Oldboy”) and Baz Luhrmann (“The Great Gatsby”) contributed to the unfortunate trend, and both of their movies received tepid reviews as a result.

2014 will bring even more unnecessary and likely terrible remakes. An “Annie” reboot produced by Jay-Z and starring 10-year-old Oscar nominee Quvenzhané Wallis will be released next December, and the trailer makes it look just as awkward and misguided as it sounds.

Meanwhile, “Fantastic 4” and “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” remakes threaten to top the originals in terms of pure unpleasantness while “Jungle Book” and “Godzilla” remakes simply seem unnecessary or even insulting given the originals are still seen as undisputable classics today.

The flood of remakes hitting theaters sets a dangerous precedent for filmmaking. The industry should be built on innovation and original ideas, not bland remakes.

The idea that kids in a few decades may only know about a mediocre “Robocop” remake that doesn’t stand up against the controversial original should scare movie lovers everywhere.

In a 2012 interview, Joel Kinnaman, the star of 2014’s “Robocop” remake, stated that creating a reboot that could be labeled PG-13 would be a “huge mistake.”

But the shocking violence of the original film wasn’t present in the remake, and the film was in fact given a PG-13 rating.

While Samuel L. Jackson, another star of the film, insisted that the remake would have been rated R at the time when the original was released, the film nonetheless felt like an empty attempt to emulate the first film without truly adding anything of its own or even respecting the shockingly graphic imagery and controversial nature of the original.

Director José Padiliha stated that the movie was meant to be PG-13 so that it could appeal to the broadest possible audience; in other words, Padiliha’s remake had to make money, even if that meant sacrificing the integrity of the film.

Remakes are no longer made because filmmakers believe they can put a fresh spin on an old classic; instead, studios simply add updated special effects and reuse old stories just to make some easy money.

In 2013, theaters were loaded with remakes. Even acclaimed directors like Spike Lee (“Oldboy”) and Baz Luhrmann (“The Great Gatsby”) contributed to the unfortunate trend, and both of their movies received tepid reviews as a result.

2014 will bring even more unnecessary and likely terrible remakes. An “Annie” reboot produced by Jay-Z and starring 10-year-old Oscar nominee Quvenzhané Wallis will be released next December, and the trailer makes it look just as awkward and misguided as it sounds.

Meanwhile, “Fantastic 4” and “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” remakes threaten to top the originals in terms of pure unpleasantness while “Jungle Book” and “Godzilla” remakes simply seem unnecessary or even insulting given the originals are still seen as undisputable classics today.

The flood of remakes hitting theaters sets a dangerous precedent for filmmaking. The industry should be built on innovation and original ideas, not bland remakes.

The idea that kids in a few decades may only know about a mediocre “Robocop” remake that doesn’t stand up against the controversial original should scare movie lovers everywhere.

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