Upcoming ASR Senior Research Seminars

Upcoming ASR Senior Research Seminars

Thur May 8, 10:45 am (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Dylan McClure – Growing Rochelle Salt and Testing its Piezoelectric Properties, Research done at Florida State University

 

Monday May 12, 12:15 pm (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Peter Cottingham – Water Temperature’s Effect on Botrylloides violaceous, Research done at Salem Coastal Sound Watch, Salem, MA

 

Wed May 14, 7:45 am (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Easton Ehlers – Change Agent Attribution in the Pacific Northwest using LandTrendr Label Interface, Version 1.1, Research done at Boston University

 

Mon May 19,12:15  pm (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Cameron Shaw – Determination of Measurement Placement Error in Coarse Woody Debris Biomass Surveying Methods, Research done at Harvard Forest, Harvard University

 

Tue May 20, 1:25 pm (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Mike Chlumecky – Silk as a Biomaterial: Sponges, Gels, and Films, Research done at Tufts University Tissue Engineering Research Center

 

Thur May 22, 7:45 am (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Vanessa Kelley – Assay development in STHdhQ111 CAG repeat knock-in striatal cells, Research done at Dept of Genetics, Mass General Hospital

 

Fri May 23, 8:50 am (D block)  MERHS Auditorium

Jack Freed – The Evolution of Silk: Mechanical, Economic and Historical Perspectives, Research done withTufts University Tissue Engineering Research Center

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Visiting a Capella groups perform for school

MERHS a Capella group, the Soundwaves, hosted a Capella Night. Pingree’s Spectrum Highlights, Hamilton-Wenham’s Kings of the Beach, and Gordon College’s Scotsmen came to the high school to perform. Each group sang covers of multiple songs throughout the night. Different members of the Soundwaves hosted the a Capella groups, which entailed showing them around the school and making sure everything was on schedule for their performance.

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Boys’ tennis opens their season with multiple wins

  Three wins begin the boys’ tennis team’s success with a victory of 3-2 against Masconomet, 5-0 against Amesbury, and 5-0 against Pentucket. 

  Over the last weekend in March, the boys competed in the MAC Jamboree. They lost to St. John’s Prep after beating Marblehead and Pentucket.   

  According to coach Robert Bilsbury, the team’s rivals this year are Pentucket, North Reading, Masconomet, and Triton. 

  According to Bilsbury, the line-up for the team is flexible because there are still many challenge matches to be played. 

  The game against Masconomet on April 4 ended in the boys winning 3-2. Junior Michael Fuca played No. 1 singles and won (6-0)(6-2), freshman Dewey Komishane won at  No. 2 singles (6-2)(6-4); and eighth-grader Garrett Lamothe lost at No. 3 singles; First doubles won with junior Jeffrey Durkin and sophomore Jake Rich (6-4)(6-4), and second doubles junior Winston Feuerbach and sophomore Azzie Economo lost.  

  “Our goal this year is to go deep into the state tournament and win the league,” Rich said. 

  According to Bilsbury, the boys are all doing tremendous and will play some great matches.

  The boys also won the CAL Individual Open for the second year on Sat., April 12.

  Members of the team are optimistic about their standing and potential in the Cape Ann League matches.

  “The team has a lot of talent, and we can definitely do some damage in the league this year,” captain Seth Cohen said.

  Against Amesbury on April 9, the boys had a win of 5-0. Fuca, at first singles, won (6-0) (6-1); Dewey Komishane won second singles (6-0) (6-0); and Justin Eichenberger won (6-0) (6-1) at third singles. First doubles team Garrett Lamothe and Winston Feuerbach won (6-1) (6-2), and second doubles Azzie Economo and Josh Brewster won (6-4) (6-1).

  On April 14, the boys won 5-0. Fuca won on first singles (6-3) (6-1); Komishane on second singles (6-3) (4-6) (6-4), and Lamothe on third singles (6-4) (6-0). Durkin and Cohen won on first doubles (6-3) (6-2), and Rich and Eichenberger won second doubles (6-3) (6-1).

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Students learn about other cultures through International Week

inter weekInternational Week brought new and unique presenters to students in order to expand both their knowledge of foreign language and other cultures, according to foreign language department head Michelle Magaña.

  This year, this special week took place from March 11 to March 14. Each day in that range featured a different country from around the world. Tuesday was Italy Day, Wednesday was Mexico Day, Thursday was Thailand day, and Friday was Brazil Day.

   The main purpose of International Week is to encourage high school students to branch out and travel abroad Magaña said.

  “We like to hold International Week each year because we want to inspire students to travel to different places to explore different countries and practice the language that they are learning,” she said.

  Sophomore Devin Depaolis said that International Week helps students to learn more about other countries and their cultures.

  “The presentations help to teach people about various cultures around the world. It’s interesting to learn about cultures you don’t know about,” he said.

  Sophomore David Reid, agreed with Depaolis, specifically saying that presenter Mike Dyer presented on a region that he barely knew existed. Dyer presented on the Basque country, a region that is located on the border of Spain and France.

“Before Mr. Dyer came presented, the Basque country wasn’t even something I had heard of. It was very interesting to learn about an entirely new foreign culture,” he said.

  Depaolis also acknowledged that the presenters and presentations are often useful to improve students’ skills and knowledge in foreign language, whether it be French or Spanish.

  In addition to the presentations, students are able to try foreign foods in the cafeteria each day, an easy and fun way to learn about another country, junior Ben Bichet said.

Among this year’s presenters were a woman who traveled on the religious pilgrimage El Camino de Santiago, the students who traveled to France over April break last year, and even Principal Patricia Puglisi presented on her experiences in China, Magaña said.

  “The foreign food in the cafeteria is an enjoyable way to learn about the cuisine of different cultures,” Bichet said.

  For example, this year’s foods included an Italian pasta dish and Thai chicken with rice.

  Magaña also added that in order to recruit and have diverse presenters, she covers all the bases by posting in media sources like The Cricket and the principal’s newsletter.

  “We really like to avoid having teachers present because we want students to see other people who have traveled, so we try to get as much community involvement as we can,” she said.

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Sophomore Erin Carlson creates new club called Students for the Humane Treatment of Animals

Tenth-grade student Erin Carlson has turned her passion for helping animals into a way for others to help animals in a new club called Students for the Humane Treatment of Animals.

  Carlson would like to start the club in the fall.

  There are four co-advisors for the club: chemistry teacher Keith Gray, history and Learning Center teacher Shannon Alger, math teacher David Alger, and English teacher Allison Krause. 

  “I wanted to create this club because I’m interested in a career with animals, and our school doesn’t have a club or program that provides time with animals,” Carlson said. 

  This club will do hands-on work with animals, raise funds, and hopefully provide foster homes for animals. Carlson has gotten a response to help out Cape Ann Animal Aid, Northeast Animal Shelter, and Sweet Paws. 

  There is no student limit at the moment for the club, but there will be a cut off if there gets to be too many people. The club will first be open to high school students, but if there are not enough students, then it will be opened to middle school students.  

  According to Carlson, it is undecided where the group will meet and how the students will get around to the places they are going to help out with. The students may have to carpool, or there may be a bus. 

  “I hope the club meets twice a week. Only one meeting per week is mandatory for the students. There are exceptions for students who participate in sports or other activities,” Carlson said.  

  The club may interfere with some activities, but said it is completely understandable to miss them for those activities. 

  According to Carlson, the first meeting of the month will most likely set up the schedule and have signups for hands-on activities, and the other meetings will be mostly setting up or planning fundraisers. The meetings for this club will be no longer than an hour and a half. 

  The club will most likely provide community service for the students, Carlson said.

  The teachers involved are just as interested in starting this program. 

  “I am a huge animal lover, and I am interested in being involved in an organization that cares for animals,” Shannon Alger said. 

  According to Gray, this club is necessary because animals don’t have a voice and too many of them are abused. 

  Some students, according to Carlson, may have to go through some type of training depending on the type of work they will be doing in the club, Carlson said.

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Softball team begins season with fourth coach in four years

New varsity softball coach Mike Harrison has agreed to lead the team during this season.

Harrison has coached softball on and off for 20 years; he was a baseball coach for several years, working at Emmanuel College, MIT, UMass Lowell, and Lasell College.

He said he enjoys coaching and is looking forward to providing the best venues for the new players to learn more techniques in this year’s softball season.

Scrimmaging away against Gloucester on Mon., April 7, in their first unofficial game of the program, the team lost 3-2.

“I don’t play my programs by wins and losses but by people who take it seriously and people who have a dedication for the sport,” Harrison said.

Their first official game was scheduled for Wed., April 9, at home against Ipswich, but it was postponed for another time due to weather conditions.

At their game on Fri., April 11, at Rockport the girls played a close game, but lost 2-1, according to sophomore and leftfielder, Isabella Hickey.

“He’s teaching us stuff that the world class professionals have done who play in the international league,” sophomore and right fielder Molly Lynch said.

According to senior captain Samantha Taylor, the coach has stressed the importance of mechanics in the softball team’s practices.

“The new coach is helping a lot; he’s very knowledgeable. We’re working a lot on mechanics,” Taylor said.

Harrison said he is excited to start the season off with his introduction to not only enhancing the player’s abilities, but also boosting their confidence.

“I try to build the kid’s confidence, and they’ve had three or four different coaches in the past, and I want to give them the upper mechanics on the field,” he said.

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Lacrosse girls on track for successful season

Starting the season with an 11-9 triumph over Marblehead High School, girls’ lacrosse team hopes to continue success, according to coach Sarah Holch.

The win against Marblehead was the first victory in the program’s history against that team. Holch believes the team’s seniors were to credit for the victory.

“All of our seniors had excellent games. In the past we have had a tough time at the start of the game, but this year our team came out 110% from the first whistle. I do not think Marblehead knew what hit them,” she said.

Holch was impressed by performances by senior captains, defensive players Lila Hughes and Sophia Guerriero, and goal keeper Katie Furber.

Continuing their success, the girls picked up two more wins. They won 13-9 gaianst Newburyport and 11-4 against Lynnfeild. They have reached double digits in score each game, and their current record is 3-0.

Attack player senior captain Brittany Smith has confidence in her team’s ability to shake off the rust and pick up where they left off last year. “I think our game needs to improve on our transitions from defense to midfield and then to offense. Once we accomplish that, we’ll be much better off,” she said.

According to Smith, the team is looking for two consecutive Cape Ann League title as champions. They also want to progress further into the state tournament than they have in previous years after getting knocked out in semifinals.

Co-captain, senior Taylor Meek, also an attack, thinks the team has a good shot because of an abundance of leaders. “We have a lot of senior leadership, not just the captains. This will help to ensure everyone is committed and able to contribute to our success,” she said.

Meek hopes to redeem the team’s losses against rivals such as Masconomet. Other rivals include Hamilton Wenham and Ipswich, whom the team beat last year.

According to the coach, these matches should be less of a problem this year. “I think we’ll do well against Girls Lax courtesy Sabrina PallazolaMasconomet and Marblehead this year,” Holch said.

Meek has confidence in what her team can do in the future. “We had two good wins last week and are looking for the same strength and intensity we showed,” she said.

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Update on the Varsity Baseball

By Sarah Williams

Varsity baseball began the season with a 0-3 record.

As of March 19, baseball has been busy training to have a winning team.

In the first game of the season on March 11, they lost, 3-0 against Amesbury, in a recent press release coach Robert Garrett said, “The Hornet’s offense was unable to support sophomore Brandon Bartlett’s strong outing on the mound. Bartlett threw 6 and 1/3 innings, giving up just two hits and two earned runs while striking out seven. “

“Offensively, senior Liam Logue was 1-3 with a double, and junior captain Craig Carter and senior Mike Leobelenz each added a single,” Garrett said.

Their second game was a 15-6 loss against Lynnfield High School on March 12. “The Hornets jumped out to a 2-0 lead after the first half inning, but the pitching staff and defense was unable to hold the lead,” Garrett said.

In the game on March 14 they lost against Ipswich with a score of 14-3.

Baseball 3- from Brandon B

The team faces strong competition. “The bigger schools we play — Cape Ann [league schools], North Reading, Masco — they are always very good, as well as our rivals Georgetown and Rockport.”

“Our rivals like Newburyport and Georgetown are going to be tough opponents. They always have good teams,” senior Liam Logue said.

After the first week of the season, the team chose three captains: junior middle infielder and pitcher Craig Carter, senior pitcher Dominic Ceronne, and senior third base pitcher Kevin Carter.

Kevin Carter explained his role as captain. “It is up to me to lead by example and be approachable by all players on varsity and junior varsity with any issues they have. Sort of like a coach,” he said.

Ceronne added that the captains also get everyone organized like letting people know what time practice is.

Craig Carter has many goals for the team. “A goal would be to show up to every game ready to play and leave nothing on the field at all times,” he said “Baseball is a team sport, but when it is your turn to step up, it is up to you to deliver.”

Ceronne explained his goals. “Just work hard every day, get better at what we do, and try to win games. That’s what we strive for,” he said

“We really need to improve this year with our attitude and never quit mentality,” Kevin Carter said.

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Movie remakes ruin the original interpretation

In a 2012 interview, Joel Kinnaman, the star of 2014’s “Robocop” remake, stated that creating a reboot that could be labeled PG-13 would be a “huge mistake.”

But the shocking violence of the original film wasn’t present in the remake, and the film was in fact given a PG-13 rating.

While Samuel L. Jackson, another star of the film, insisted that the remake would have been rated R at the time when the original was released, the film nonetheless felt like an empty attempt to emulate the first film without truly adding anything of its own or even respecting the shockingly graphic imagery and controversial nature of the original.

Director José Padiliha stated that the movie was meant to be PG-13 so that it could appeal to the broadest possible audience; in other words, Padiliha’s remake had to make money, even if that meant sacrificing the integrity of the film.

Remakes are no longer made because filmmakers believe they can put a fresh spin on an old classic; instead, studios simply add updated special effects and reuse old stories just to make some easy money.

In 2013, theaters were loaded with remakes. Even acclaimed directors like Spike Lee (“Oldboy”) and Baz Luhrmann (“The Great Gatsby”) contributed to the unfortunate trend, and both of their movies received tepid reviews as a result.

2014 will bring even more unnecessary and likely terrible remakes. An “Annie” reboot produced by Jay-Z and starring 10-year-old Oscar nominee Quvenzhané Wallis will be released next December, and the trailer makes it look just as awkward and misguided as it sounds.

Meanwhile, “Fantastic 4” and “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” remakes threaten to top the originals in terms of pure unpleasantness while “Jungle Book” and “Godzilla” remakes simply seem unnecessary or even insulting given the originals are still seen as undisputable classics today.

The flood of remakes hitting theaters sets a dangerous precedent for filmmaking. The industry should be built on innovation and original ideas, not bland remakes.

The idea that kids in a few decades may only know about a mediocre “Robocop” remake that doesn’t stand up against the controversial original should scare movie lovers everywhere.

In a 2012 interview, Joel Kinnaman, the star of 2014’s “Robocop” remake, stated that creating a reboot that could be labeled PG-13 would be a “huge mistake.”

But the shocking violence of the original film wasn’t present in the remake, and the film was in fact given a PG-13 rating.

While Samuel L. Jackson, another star of the film, insisted that the remake would have been rated R at the time when the original was released, the film nonetheless felt like an empty attempt to emulate the first film without truly adding anything of its own or even respecting the shockingly graphic imagery and controversial nature of the original.

Director José Padiliha stated that the movie was meant to be PG-13 so that it could appeal to the broadest possible audience; in other words, Padiliha’s remake had to make money, even if that meant sacrificing the integrity of the film.

Remakes are no longer made because filmmakers believe they can put a fresh spin on an old classic; instead, studios simply add updated special effects and reuse old stories just to make some easy money.

In 2013, theaters were loaded with remakes. Even acclaimed directors like Spike Lee (“Oldboy”) and Baz Luhrmann (“The Great Gatsby”) contributed to the unfortunate trend, and both of their movies received tepid reviews as a result.

2014 will bring even more unnecessary and likely terrible remakes. An “Annie” reboot produced by Jay-Z and starring 10-year-old Oscar nominee Quvenzhané Wallis will be released next December, and the trailer makes it look just as awkward and misguided as it sounds.

Meanwhile, “Fantastic 4” and “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” remakes threaten to top the originals in terms of pure unpleasantness while “Jungle Book” and “Godzilla” remakes simply seem unnecessary or even insulting given the originals are still seen as undisputable classics today.

The flood of remakes hitting theaters sets a dangerous precedent for filmmaking. The industry should be built on innovation and original ideas, not bland remakes.

The idea that kids in a few decades may only know about a mediocre “Robocop” remake that doesn’t stand up against the controversial original should scare movie lovers everywhere.

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April WebSurfer

Graph TV is a brand new website perfect for when you’re trying to decide what TV show to start on Netflix, On Demand, or just on network TV. The homepage simply features the title of the website in big letters and a search bar. Type in whatever TV show you wish to find reviews on, and it will display a graph of assorted ratings. It takes the average ratings by episode from users on IMDB and plots the points based on the highest and lowest ratings out of 10. Breaking Bad on AMC, for example, ranges from about an 8.25 out of 10 all the way to a perfect 10/10. GraphTV gives you the feedback you’re looking for with just a quick search and a click.

Silk Interactive fully satisfies the artistic desire users crave while browsing the Internet. Start by dragging your mouse in any pattern you choose, and release the mouse. Click on the Controls button to change the color and blend multiple colors together. There is also a setting to change the symmetry for each line, so the drawing can either be abstract or with a symmetrical form. Draw as few lines as possible, or layer them on until they’re indistinguishable from each other. Either way, it’s a blank canvas waiting to be drawn on.

2048 started the craze that is sweeping the nation, or at least our school. Now popular on the App Store, 2048 is an addicting puzzle game that can take up numerous hours of your day. The object of the game is to combine like numbers, and the board usually starts off with either a set of 2s, a set of 4s, or a combination of the two. Eventually, the numbers increase on the number line – 2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024, and finally ending with 2048. The player must be mindful of the board so it doesn’t fill up, leaving no more possible combinations. It is a game of strategy that is quite easy to get lost in.

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