Students throw a Tea Party!

Students of Elizabeth Edgerton’s honors English class discuss works of British literature over tea and baked goods.

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Sophomores replicate DNA molecules in biology class

In biology teacher Erica Everett’s 10th grade honors class, students created DNA molecules using plastic K’Nex pieces.  After learning about the make-up of the molecules, the sophomores construct the structures with colored pieces that correspond to their respective molecular parts.

Sophomores Aidan Burbridge and David Reid connect the plastic pieces that represent the sugar phosphate backbone of the DNA structure.  The two sides of the ladder are held parallel to each other by the purine and pyrimidine bases that make up the “rungs.” Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Aidan Burbridge and David Reid connect the plastic pieces that represent the sugar phosphate backbone of the DNA structure. The two sides of the ladder are held parallel to each other by the purine and pyrimidine bases that make up the “rungs.” Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah White pieces together the “rungs” of the ladder-looking DNA structure.  The students make sure that each nucleotide only connects to its counterpart; adenine and thymine bond together, and cytosine and guanine bond together. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah White pieces together the “rungs” of the ladder-looking DNA structure. The students make sure that each nucleotide only connects to its counterpart; adenine and thymine bond together, and cytosine and guanine bond together. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Chris DiFluri and Lydia Parker consult the instruction booklet as they build their DNA structure.  They click the plastic pieces into place to correspond to the diagram shown in the guide. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Chris DiFluri and Lydia Parker consult the instruction booklet as they build their DNA structure. They click the plastic pieces into place to correspond to the diagram shown in the guide. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students use the gray plastic connecters to represent the bonds that hold the sides of the ladder-like structure together.  Once the sides are complete, the students will begin to add the “steps” of the ladder. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students use the gray plastic connecters to represent the bonds that hold the sides of the ladder-like structure together. Once the sides are complete, the students will begin to add the “steps” of the ladder. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Student teacher Amanda Maddox explains the activity to sophomores Liam Crossen and Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon.  Maddox has been participating as a teacher helper for one month and frequently assists the students by answering questions and clarifying the topics being taught. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Student teacher Amanda Maddox explains the activity to sophomores Liam Crossen and Alexei Goldsmith-Solomon. Maddox has been participating as a teacher helper for one month and frequently assists the students by answering questions and clarifying the topics being taught. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Sabrina Pallazola and Sydney Christopher begin to twist the ladder structure onto their central stand to keep it upright.  The students attempt not to break the bonds as they further condense the coil. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Sabrina Pallazola and Sydney Christopher begin to twist the ladder structure onto their central stand to keep it upright. The students attempt not to break the bonds as they further condense the coil. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students are given K’Nex and an instruction guide in order to create their DNA molecules.  Each color represents a different kind nucleotide, namely thymine, guanine, adenine, and cytosine.  Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The students are given K’Nex and an instruction guide in order to create their DNA molecules. Each color represents a different kind nucleotide, namely thymine, guanine, adenine, and cytosine. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tess Hosman and Melissa Schuh add a cap to the top of their plastic DNA molecule so that the double helix is preserved.  Once finished, the structure accurately represents the twisted coil shape of DNA.  Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores Tess Hosman and Melissa Schuh add a cap to the top of their plastic DNA molecule so that the double helix is preserved. Once finished, the structure accurately represents the twisted coil shape of DNA. Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomore Hannah White poses with her almost-complete double helix DNA representation.  The “twisted ladder” shape of DNA was discovered by scientists James Watson and Frances Crick in the mid-1950s after studying scientist Rosalind Franklin’s famous DNA picture entitled “Photo 51.” Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Hannah White poses with her almost-complete double helix DNA representation. The “twisted ladder” shape of DNA was discovered by scientists James Watson and Frances Crick in the mid-1950s after studying scientist Rosalind Franklin’s famous DNA picture entitled “Photo 51.” Credit: Susie Buck for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Alpine Ski Team competes in the Interscholastic Race

For the Interscholastics, each school sends eight of their best racers of each gender to compete. Racers compete in slalom and giant slalom courses with their combined time of both as their total score for the race.

Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Max Hahn pose for a photo after slipping the slalom course with the rest of the Manchester Essex Alpine race team. Slipping the course involves slowly skiing over all of the bumps and ruts while allowing the racer to become familiar with the setup of the gates before their race. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh graders Luca Schwartz and Max Hahn pose for a photo after slipping the slalom course with the rest of the Manchester Essex Alpine race team. Slipping the course involves slowly skiing over all of the bumps and ruts while allowing the racer to become familiar with the setup of the gates before their race. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Ski racers from every team take as many practice runs as they can before being called to the starting gate to begin their race. There are seven different schools that raced including Manchester-Essex, St. Johns Prep, Austin Prep, Masconomet, Andover, North Andover, and Haverhill. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Ski racers from every team take as many practice runs as they can before being called to the starting gate to begin their race. There are seven different schools that raced including Manchester-Essex, St. Johns Prep, Austin Prep, Masconomet, Andover, North Andover, and Haverhill. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Wolf Hahn prepares to punch the gate. When the skier begins to get too close to the gate, they reach and hit it to prevent themselves from straddling it or wiping out in another form. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Freshman Wolf Hahn prepares to punch the gate. When the skier begins to get too close to the gate, they reach and hit it to prevent themselves from straddling it or wiping out in another form. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Luca Schwartz begins tucking as he nears the end of the race course. Tucking is used to gain speed during the course when the racer feels as though they can maintain control while tucked into position. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grader Luca Schwartz begins tucking as he nears the end of the race course. Tucking is used to gain speed during the course when the racer feels as though they can maintain control while tucked into position. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

High school student from St. Johns Prep competes against the Manchester-Essex boys alpine ski team. The GS suits that most of the racers wear are covered in padding to protect each individual from hurting themselves if they were to connect with a gate. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
High school student from St. Johns Prep competes against the Manchester-Essex boys alpine ski team. The GS suits that most of the racers wear are covered in padding to protect each individual from hurting themselves if they were to connect with a gate. Credit: Phoebe Schwartz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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MS Student Council discusses Project Pink

On Tuesday February 11th, the Middle School Student Council met with advisor Joanne Maino to discuss their upcoming plans for Project Pink. The acronym “Pink” stands for “Paying in Kindness”. The goal of Project Pink is to make the Manchester Essex community, both inside and outside of the school, a better place through simple acts of kindness and community service. At the meeting, the group planned a student-led assembly to be presented to the Middle School.  Maino clarified the layout of the upcoming presentation about Project Pink to members. Maino stated that students will work on elements of the presentation both individually and in groups over the next few weeks at Student Council meetings.

 

Students listen to 6th Grader Madeleine Coco as she voices her ideas about how to get the middle school community involved in Project Pink. Members discussed surveying the student body about what their definitions of community, service, paying, and kindness are. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Students listen to 6th Grader Madeleine Coco as she voices her ideas about how to get the middle school community involved in Project Pink. Members discussed surveying the student body about what their definitions of community, service, paying, and kindness are. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
7th grader Sasa Willems explains the difference between taking action in community service and merely saying “empty words”. Willems noted, “It’s easy to just say ‘I’m going to be a better person by doing community service.’ In order to actually pay in kindness, people need to follow through with what they say and take action.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
7th grader Sasa Willems explains the difference between taking action in community service and merely saying “empty words”. Willems noted, “It’s easy to just say ‘I’m going to be a better person by doing community service.’ In order to actually pay in kindness, people need to follow through with what they say and take action.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

 

After members broke into small groups, advisor Joanne Maino created a finalized list of the main goals of Project Pink that the students had mentioned. The group addressed not only the goals of Project Pink, but also effective methods of involving students in the project, and also creative ways capture the attention of students. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
After members broke into small groups, advisor Joanne Maino created a finalized list of the main goals of Project Pink that the students had mentioned. The group addressed not only the goals of Project Pink, but also effective methods of involving students in the project, and also creative ways capture the attention of students. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Student council member Christiana Locke jotted down notes as the meeting progressed. At the meeting, Locke expressed her idea of creating a list of questions to ask to the Middle School student body about how they will pay in kindness during the upcoming months. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Student council member Christiana Locke jotted down notes as the meeting progressed. At the meeting, Locke expressed her idea of creating a list of questions to ask to the Middle School student body about how they will pay in kindness during the upcoming months. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
6th grader George Soucy illustrates the concept of Kaizen to the Student Council by drawing a goal ladder. At the top of the ladder is the main goal, in this case, it is achieving a closer knit community. Each rung on the latter represents one small act of “paying in kindness” a person can achieve. Kaizen is a Japanese philosophy meaning “improvement” or “change for the best”. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
6th grader George Soucy illustrates the concept of Kaizen to the Student Council by drawing a goal ladder. At the top of the ladder is the main goal, in this case, it is achieving a closer knit community. Each rung on the latter represents one small act of “paying in kindness” a person can achieve. Kaizen is a Japanese philosophy meaning “improvement” or “change for the best”. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
6th graders George Soucy and Lorenzo Venegas-Villa collaborate about possible methods the Student Council could use to get the Middle School community involved in Project Pink. At the meeting, students separated into small groups then came back together as one large group to create a master list of both the goals of Project pink and ways to involve the Middle School community. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
6th graders George Soucy and Lorenzo Venegas-Villa collaborate about possible methods the Student Council could use to get the Middle School community involved in Project Pink. At the meeting, students separated into small groups then came back together as one large group to create a master list of both the goals of Project pink and ways to involve the Middle School community. Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Student Council advisor Joanna Maino and students talk briefly after the meeting had ended about any additional ideas for Project Pink. 7th grader Sirine Benali later noted, “Coming up with ideas like Project Pink is the reason why I joined Student Council in the first place. It’s fun to have the power to be able to make a change in the middle school community like this.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Student Council advisor Joanna Maino and students talk briefly after the meeting had ended about any additional ideas for Project Pink. 7th grader Sirine Benali later noted, “Coming up with ideas like Project Pink is the reason why I joined Student Council in the first place. It’s fun to have the power to be able to make a change in the middle school community like this.” Credit: Amber Paré for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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Eigth Graders investigate cells

On Wednesday February 12, science teacher Amy Dobbins taught her class about the organelles in cells. Dobbins handed student microscopes to view inside cells. Students saw the nucleus the cell brain, the cell membrane, which separates the interior of a cell from the exterior and more.

Peering through the eye of a microscope, eighth grader Marc Sears examines the organelle inside a cell. sears views the cell membrane, which separates the two main parts of a cell. Credit: Jenny Beardsley Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Peering through the eye of a microscope, eighth grader Marc Sears examines the organelle inside a cell. sears views the cell membrane, which separates the two main parts of a cell.
Credit: Jenny Beardsley Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
8th grader Grace Porter copies down information she learned from the teacher. Porter is filling out a worksheet that was given out to the class. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
8th grader Grace Porter copies down information she learned from the teacher. Porter is filling out a worksheet that was given out to the class.
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Cells shown on the black slide are only visible through a microscope. These enlarged cells contain organelles that hold a specific job, keeping the cell alive and working.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Cells shown on the black slide are only visible through a microscope. These enlarged cells contain organelles that hold a specific job, keeping the cell alive and working.
Credit: Jenny Beardsley Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dobbins is briefly explaining what to do when observing these delicate cells. Organelles are found in every living thing. Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dobbins is briefly explaining what to do when observing these delicate cells. Organelles are found in every living thing.
Credit: Jenny Beardsley and Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dobbins gave every student a handout at the beginning of the class, to record information they find out about these cells. This worksheet gives examples of what organelles do inside of cells and how each of them separately function.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Dobbins gave every student a handout at the beginning of the class, to record information they find out about these cells. This worksheet gives examples of what organelles do inside of cells and how each of them separately function.
Credit: Jenny Beardsley Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Recording what she sees, Julia Neiberle describes what she has seen through the microscope. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Recording what she sees, Julia Neiberle describes what she has seen through the microscope.
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Cosmo Pallazola peers through the eye of a microscope, studying the organelles in cells. Pallazola took time to look through each one of the slides. Credit: Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Cosmo Pallazola peers through the eye of a microscope, studying the organelles in cells. Pallazola took time to look through each one of the slides.
Credit: Laura Fitzgerald Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Green Team Behind the Scenes

Every day the Green Team interns work through out the building helping not only the schools environment, but also the environment in general. Their jobs can consist of working in the back room of the library sorting chip bags, mixing compost water for watering plants, and supervising the lunch recycling system in the dining hall.

 

Sophomore Ben Shlegel sorts chip bags based on specific brands whose bags have different kinds of plastics.  This is a critical step that has to be done before throwing away the chip bags. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Ben Shlegel sorts chip bags based on specific brands whose bags have different kinds of plastics. This is a critical step that has to be done before throwing away the chip bags. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A blue bin has all the unsorted chip bags that are thrown away at lunch. Some are used for terracycling, while some are put in the dumpsters. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
A blue bin has all the unsorted chip bags that are thrown away at lunch. Some are used for terracycling, while some are put in the dumpsters. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The blue bin consists of chip bags that have yet to be sorted. The light green bins are the bins with the sorted chip bags. One bin is for markers and writing utensils, the second is for chip bags that have a slick plastic covers and the third one is for chip bags with a matte cover. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The blue bin consists of chip bags that have yet to be sorted. The light green bins are the bins with the sorted chip bags. One bin is for markers and writing utensils, the second is for chip bags that have a slick plastic covers and the third one is for chip bags with a matte cover. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shlegel does his next task by mixing compost water. Compost water is food that turned into dirt over time and water. This water is used to water the plants throughout the building. These large containers have to be filled and mixed about 2-3 times a week. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shlegel does his next task by mixing compost water. Compost water is food that turned into dirt over time and water. This water is used to water the plants throughout the building. These large containers have to be filled and mixed about 2-3 times a week. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The compost water is mixed together. By the end of the week the water eventually evaporates and is filled again to the top. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The compost water is mixed together. By the end of the week the water eventually evaporates and is filled again to the top. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Junior Teddy Economo and senior Ellie Zwart water one of the plants by the guidance office on the second floor with the compost water. Zwart and Economo are both interns of the Green Team. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Teddy Economo and senior Ellie Zwart water one of the plants by the guidance office on the second floor with the compost water. Zwart and Economo are both interns of the Green Team. Credit: Marlaina Fulmer for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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NHS continues its tutoring program

Members of the National Honors Society tutor after school every Monday and Thursday. The members tutor middle and high school students in order to receive the community service hours that are needed to participate in NHS.

 

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NHS Provides Valentine Babysitting Service

On Valentine’s Day, the National Honors Society hosted a babysitting service at the Manchester Community center. The service provided an opportunity for parents to get away and have a romantic evening, while raising money for NHS.

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Senior Anna Heffernan and junior Meghan Conway set up a table for arts and crafts. The volunteers arrived to the community service center an hour early to ensure that everything was set up correctly. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Senior Vanessa Kelly carries a basket full of arts and craft supplies into the building before the children arrive. All of the materials were brought by the NHS members and NHS advisor Maria Burgess. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Senior Rachel Daley makes a poster to display outside of the community service center to advertise the babysitting service. At the event there were various games and crafts for the children to create a fun environment. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Senior Landon Komichane explains to parents dropping off their kids what activities will be offered to their children and what time the children should be picked up. Parents had to fill out a form after dropping off their children to give necessary information. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Two children use markers supplied by NHS members to color pictures. Various crafts such as painting, paper machete, and coloring were offered. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Three boys play foosball on the upper level of the community center. All of the children intermingled and played together at the event. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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The community center was spacious enough for NHS to fit three tables, which allowed for lots of different craft stations. In addition to crafts, a movie was also shown later in the night. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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A boy colors in a picture drawn by an NHS member. Children at the event could play independently or play games in groups. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Sixth grader Spencer Meek plays the game “Apples to Apples” with a boy at the babysitting center. Snacks and drinks were also offered to the children supplied by NHS members and NHS advisor Maria Burgess. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seniors Tatum Hofsman and Vanessa Kelly watch over younger girls as they color. The NHS members interacted with the children and played games. Credit: Olivia Lantz for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Students Raise Money with Flowers

For two weeks, a few students from the Global Issues class sold carnations that would be handed out on Valentine’s Day. The event made a total of $150 dollars which is equivalent to 600 meal packages at this year’s chosen NGO, Stop Hunger Now.

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Turning in essays made easier with new program

Turn It In is a program recently purchased for the high school’s history and english departments. The interface allows students to turn in papers online and teachers to grade them quickly and thoroughly.

According to Principal Patricia Puglisi, school administrators had looked into this program in the past, but this was the first year that they were able to find extra money in the budget to afford the startup costs for Turn It In.

The program allows students to check their own work for any errors in plagiarism or citations prior to submission. It also reduces the risk of losing a paper or forgetting it in a printer at home. Students can also see their grades immediately after the teacher has corrected their paper online.

“The goal of this program is not to catch more  mistakes and call students out on them; it is to provide as much feedback as possible to aid in student learning and development,” Puglisi said.

Teachers, on the other hand, are able to grade papers anywhere that they have access to the Internet, avoid missing errors with help from a grammar checking option, and leave in-depth comments without space restrictions directly onto the papers.

“I really thought that I would miss having the papers actually in my hands as I graded them, but the convenience of being able to grade anywhere outweighs it,” English teacher Gloria Tanner said.

It is not mandatory for teachers to use Turn It In, but every teacher from the english and history departments received preliminary training online in December to help them use the website efficiently.

Students in Tanner’s class have turned in two essays so far on Turn It In and are generally optimistic about the future of the website.

“It is weird to turn in our essays online at first, but I think that Turn It In will eventually make students and teachers more accountable for their work and help us improve our writing,” junior Ariana Jackson said.Print

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