‘Beastly’ fails to enrapture audiences, falls short of predecessor ‘Beauty and the Beast’

The dying rose in “Beauty and the Beast” symbolizes the beast running out of time to overcome his challenge. If this rose represented “Beastly,” the human version of the Disney animation, it would have eventually died.

By Melissa Moore

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  The dying rose in “Beauty and the Beast” symbolizes the beast running out of time to overcome his challenge.  If this rose represented “Beastly,” the human version of the Disney animation, it would have eventually died.

  “Beastly” follows Kyle Kingson, a gorgeous, spoiled high school boy who believes physical appearance leads directly to success.  However, upon crossing Kendra Hilferty, a strange girl who coincidentally happens to be a witch, he is transformed into an ugly beast until someone says the words “I love you” to him.

  Kyle, abhorring his new look, recedes into a secluded house where no one can see him, brooding in self-pity for losing his looks and any shred of hope his father could ever love him.

  Kyle’s father, a famous news anchor, never had time for him even when Kyle had brain cancer.  This nuance, however, is quickly forgotten in the plot.

  In his ugly, brooding state, Kyle finally remembers one girl, Lindy, whom he began to like.  Instead of actually talking to her, he follows her around New York City and camps out in front of her apartment before blackmailing her dad to force her to live with Kyle in isolation.  To prevent outside recognition, Kyle calls himself “Hunter.”

  The plotline progresses predictably with very few moments of potential success.  The script is average, barely intriguing the audience.  Only for brief instances is one completely captivated by the movie; instead, one’s eyes will be distracted by Kyle’s many markings.

  The word “ugly” should not apply to Kyle, even in beast form.  Though some scars slightly disfigure his face, he looks more like a henna model who recently got into a knife fight.

  The one redeeming quality in “Beastly” is the message: inner beauty is what truly matters.  This shines true and clear and, though slightly overdone, is still refreshing to hear.

  “Beastly” runs 86 minutes and is rated PG-13 for mild violence, profanity, and drug content.

(0)

SCORE projects provide real-world experiences for seniors

Every year the Senior Choice of Related Experience (SCORE) project has been available as an opportunity for seniors to experience an internship in the world of adulthood.

By Nick Bouwer

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  Every year the Senior Choice of Related Experience (SCORE) project has been available as an opportunity for seniors to experience an internship in the world of adulthood.

  The internship begins for all seniors April 8, where they are required to intern for 30 hours a week until the end of May.

  SCORE counts for 25% of all senior’s final grades, determining for some whether they graduate or not.

  According to the head SCORE adviser Martin Stephan, the project has been around for years.

  “SCORE has been around for decades and decades and decades. When I first started the classes were much smaller and the project was much more of a privilege for the strong senior students. If you had below a C+ in a class, you couldn’t participate,” Stephan said.

   Over the last few years, SCORE has changed, becoming a requirement for all seniors to graduate while allowing them to gain much experience in real-world jobs.

  “The most common project is an internship as a teacher’s assistant, but I think the most interesting one’s are when the students take the internship into their own hands and do something they really want to do. For example, Tatiana Lyne is creating her own CD because music is what she wants to do in life,” Stephan said.

  Lyne agrees that the most interesting internships are often outside of school.

  “There are just so many internships people can find. I’m really excited to learn about what everyone is doing,” she said.

  Unique internships outside of school include senior Ashley Amero working as an intern at Beverly Hospital in the radiology department, senior Aidan Ostrowski working at a ceramics studio in Beverly, and senior Sarah Brown working with commercial photographer Debbie Gravina.

(0)

Spirit Week Gallery: Tuesday Twins!

Spring Spirit Week continued with students dressing as twins.

(0)

Spirit Week Gallery: Monday TOGA PARTY

To kick off Spring Spirit Week, students wore togas to school.

The schedule for the rest of the week is:

Tuesday Twins, Wednesday Decades, Thursday Sub Cultures, and Friday Hornets’ Pride!

(0)

Art students create valentines for elderly

Under the direction of art teacher Marion Powers, high school and middle school art students made over 60 valentines to give to the elderly at Sunrise Assisted Living.

By Laurel Edington

INDPENDENT EDITOR

  Under the direction of art teacher Marion Powers, high school and middle school art students made over 60 valentines to give to the elderly at Sunrise Assisted Living.

  Powers got the idea because her mother had resided there and Powers always brought the residents things during the holidays, especially Valentine’s Day.

  “When some of the students had extra time, I would mention it and they would make cards and I would deliver. I found that Valentine’s Day was especially a special time,” she said.

  Students from all of her classes made these cards.

  Senior Christine Walder used old magazines to cut out hearts and make a collage. On the inside she wrote “Happy Valentine’s Day.”

  “I thought that it was a very touching idea, and Mrs. Powers explained that valentines can bring back many memories for people in the nursing home. Even though it only takes a few minutes to make a valentine, it’s something that they can think about for a long time,” she said.

  Other students put small messages in the cards.

  Junior Jamie Rynkowski wrote “I hope you have a wonderful Valentine’s Day!” because “I know how important it is for someone in a nursing home to still feel like someone is out there thinking of them,” she said.

  Powers delivered the valentines on Valentine’s Day.

  She said she was going to deliver them over the weekend, but since Valentine’s Day was on a Monday, she went right after school.

  “They were so happy. They were staring at them and they all said, ‘Please, please thank the students and let them know how much I appreciate it,’” she said.

(0)

‘Robots by the C’ constructs robot for FIRST competition

Although the robotics class and the robotics team have a lot of the same members, the two operate completely separately. The robotics team is an independent program, started about 5 years ago, and was not affiliated with the school until about 4 years ago, according to junior member Sean Halloran.

By Piper Browne

INDEPENDENT STAFF

  Although the robotics class and the robotics team have a lot of the same members, the two operate completely separately. The robotics team is an independent program, started about 5 years ago, and was not affiliated with the school until about 4 years ago, according to junior member Sean Halloran.

  The team has 24 members. Halloran is this year’s team captain, and Learning Center teacher Robert Meltz is the adult leader. Juniors Ben Scarafoni and Peter Goulakos are co-captains. “The team is a lot like running a business. We have a corporate structure, and we raise our own funds, and we budget our money on buying the supplies we need,” Halloran said.

  Although the class and the club share some of the same members, they are still very different. “The big difference is that we raise our own funds and participate in the FIRST Robotics Competition, which stands for ‘For the Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology,’” Halloran said.

  In the First Robotics Competition, the team is FIRST Robotics Team 2084, and their name is “RobotsByTheC.” They meet all year round to work on small projects and to fundraise, and in the first week of January, the team went to the national kickoff event in New Hampshire where they were presented with the game of that year.

  The game this year, “Logomotion,” consists of robots from three different teams moving around inflatable shapes and putting them on pegs at the end of the field to form the FIRST logo.

  After the game is presented, the teams have six weeks to build the robot. “These are six weeks of intense work,” Halloran said. “We meet every single day at the school in room B137 and go through the design process of researching, prototyping, and testing.”

  Last year, the team placed 11 out of 53 teams at the tournament, and they made it to quarterfinals before a mechanical failure rendered them helpless. This year, the competition is April 7, 8 and 9, and they hope to be one of the four teams to move onto the National competition in St. Louis. If the team wins Nationals, they will get to meet the president at the White House, according to Halloran.

  Despite problems this year with budget and snow days, the team has created a great robot, according to Halloran. It has a mounted camera to send video back to the people driving the robot, an action claw mounted on an arm capable of reaching nine feet, and an accelerometer to detect impacts on the robot.

(0)

Boys’ basketball loses in semifinals of state tournament

Despite losing their semi-final tournament game against St. Mary’s of Lynn with a score of 77-64, the boys’ varsity basketball team is ending their season on an “excited” note, coach Duane Sigsbury said.

By Nabila Mahmud

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

 Despite losing their semi-final tournament game against St. Mary’s of Lynn with a score of 77-64, the boys’ varsity basketball team is ending their season on an “excited” note, coach Duane Sigsbury said.

  The team won the Cape Ann League with a record of 12-1, and an overall record of 16-5.

   “We’re excited about having such a great record and defeating big schools like North Andover and Wilmington. We played an extremely aggressive non-league schedule. We actually had the best record as such a small school,” Sigsbury said.

   The tournament game against St. Mary’s resulted in a mix of emotions from the entire team, including Sigsbury.

Senior captain Joseph Mussachia believes it was just simply not their night.

  “Any team could have been out there making the shots; it just wasn’t us that night. It was St. Mary’s,” Mussachia said.

  Sigsbury said, “We didn’t play the way we did the past 8-10 games. It was a strange game.” He added, “It’s always tough to lose your last game.  That’ll stick with them but that shouldn’t be the case.”

  Sigsbury hopes the seniors will focus on the accomplishments throughout the season, not losing the game.

  “We’ve accomplished so much. I love those kids. Going to practice next year and not seeing them will be tough,” he said.

  Senior captain Alex Carr will remember his last year as an achievement.

  “I love my team. We accomplished so much by winning the Cape Ann.”

  Because of the loss of six players, Sigsbury’s plans for next year include a new laying strategy. Junior captain Sean Nally agreed.

  “We have to play differently now with most of our height gone.”

(0)

DECA hosts succesful ‘highlighter dance’

This past Saturday, the 26th DECA organized the 2nd annual Highlighter Dance in order to celebrate their success at the state competition and to hold a social event for the students to get together in a fun environment. The purpose of the dance, aside from fundraising for DECA, was for the business and marketing students to learn about organization and other skills that will help with their future careers and lives […]

This past Saturday, the 26th DECA organized the 2nd annual Highlighter Dance in order to celebrate their success at the state competition and to hold a social event for the students to get together in a fun environment. The purpose of the dance, aside from fundraising for DECA, was for the business and marketing students to learn about organization and other skills that will help with their future careers and lives. A total of $350 was made, after calculating the expenses such as DJ BJ, with an attendance of 120 students, many of who are members of the DECA chapter. There were many contributions to the success of the dance, such as the effort put in by juniors Eliza Rohner and Anya Ciarametaro, who worked on making the dining hall look bright and fantastic. Principal Jim Lee and science teacher Erica Everett gave up their Saturday nights to chaperone the dance.

(0)