‘The Source Code’ captivates, intrigues audience, elicits wide variety of emotions

Many people dream of being able to go back in time to fix a formerly bad situation. In “The Source Code,” this is Captain Colter Stevens’ (Jake Gyllenhaal) assignment.

By Melissa Moore

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  Many people dream of being able to go back in time to fix a formerly bad situation.  In “The Source Code,” this is Captain Colter Stevens’ (Jake Gyllenhaal) assignment.

  Stevens wakes up on a train in the body of an unknown man.  He does not know who he is or how he got there.  Eight minutes later, the train blows up.  He then finds himself strapped in a capsule with a woman talking to him.

  The captain is a part of a new government program called the source code.  It allows people to go back and live the last eight minutes of a person’s life. Stevens’ job is to identify the bomber of the train, since this man is known to be plotting a much larger-scale bombing in downtown Chicago.

  Through trips back and forth Stevens must gather the clues necessary to determine the assassin.

  While on the train, the captain meets many characters, including a woman named Christina Warren (Michelle Monaghan), to whom he gets very close over his many eight-minute visits. 

  “The Source Code’s” soundtrack keeps the movie going and draws viewers into the movie, and the music beautifully parallels the events.

  All the actors play their roles commendably with few to no lapses in the credibility of the characters.  Each person seems genuine and stays true to his or her persona. 

  The script was well-written.  Despite the impossibility of the situation ever occurring, realistic lines make the characters come alive.

  Gyllenhaal, Monaghan, and Vera Farmiga (playing Colleen Goodwin) excel in their acting, supporting each other and making the movie both believable and intriguing.

  Through unexpected twists and turns of the plot, viewers are incapable of guessing what might happen next.  Once the mystery of “The Source Code” unfolds, one will want to see the movie again to fully understand it and pick up on nuances that may have originally been missed.

  “The Source Code” is rated PG-13 for violence and language.

(0)

Author: The Independent

Stories by individual Independant journalists can be found by using the drop down box to the right.