Ceramics students visited new wing of Museum of Fine Arts

Thirty-eight ceramics students and four chaperones traveled to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston for an art-oriented field trip on January 11. The trip focused on ceramics and works from the Cape Ann area in addition to other highlights of the new galleries.

By Nick Bouwer

INDPENDENT EDITOR

  Thirty-eight ceramics students and four chaperones traveled to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston for an art-oriented field trip on January 11. The trip focused on ceramics and works from the Cape Ann area in addition to other highlights of the new galleries.

  According to ceramics teacher Tamera Burns, students were taken on a tour of the newly opened Wing of the Americas.

   “The major focus of the tour was beyond the new wing. It was a focus on ceramics to help educate students on the art form in general and give them a chance to observe different types of work dating back from before the discovery of America to works of modern artists of today. I think it’s a world-class museum, and the trip was incredibly good,” Burns said.

  Ceramics student senior Aidan Ostrowski liked the trip.

  “I think we learned a lot, and I’m looking forward to the next field trip we take there. It’s definitely important for students like us to witness work like that and learn from the masters,” Ostrowski said.

  According to senior Matt Bouwer, the collection of classic Mayan ceramics from outside Guatemala were favorites of the classes.

  “I think a lot of people liked the works featured in that exhibit because they were beautifully done and a marvel to look at. I certainly learned a lot from them and felt they were a great benefit to see in comparison to my own work,” Bouwer said.

  The museum opened the new wing last November and is solely dedicated to exhibiting American fine art from its early beginnings to present day.

  On its opening day alone, the Museum hosted a free full day event which welcomed approximately 14,000 visitors. 

  Among the highlights of the many pieces featured in the exhibit are a collection of classic Mayan ceramics from outside Guatemala, a collection of colonial New England furniture, silver, and portraits; and a collection of Winslow Homer paintings.

  The $345 million expansion and renovation adds 49 new galleries that display more than 5,000 objects, twice the number of American works that the museum had on view.

  The exhibit begins in the wing’s basement with the Americas before Christopher Columbus, then climbs three stories through revolutionary Boston to 19th-century manifest destiny landscapes to the abstract existential paintings and works of the past century.

  The Museum has also integrated technology into the exhibit, using flat screens to greet visitors at every level and to introduce what is held on each floor.

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Author: The Independent

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