Students show their talent at Winter Concert

Thursday, December 16, at 7:30pm the MERHS Chorus, A Cappella group, and Band performed at the annual Winter Concert for family and friends. The Chorus performed first and opened with “Ding Dong! Merrily on High” and ended with “Carol of the Bells.” The group sang a total of four songs and was lead by Chorus Director Donna O’Neil and accompanied on piano by Thomas Smoker. The A Cappella group, Soundwaves, gave a wonderful performance of three songs, their hit being “Fa, La, La, La.” To close the concert the high school band performed six songs under the direction of Joe Sokol. The band performed songs such as “Do You Hear What I Hear” and “Great Movie Adventures.”

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Middle School collects over 2,457 pounds of food for Beverly Bootstraps

The food drive was organized by the middle school student council in support of Beverly Bootstraps food pantry.

The 2nd annual middle school food drive was completed on Wednesday, December 22nd.  The food drive was organized by the middle school student council in support of Beverly Bootstraps food pantry.  Bootstraps supports people and families in need throughout the North Shore and Cape Ann areas. 

For the second year running the middle school food drive has been enormously successful.  The middle school grades collected well over 2,500 food items in support of those in need.  The student council would like to thank all who participated by bringing in food, including students, parents and staff members.  They have proven yet again that  the Manchester Essex Middle School Community values compassion and empathy. 

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DECA hosts semi-formal dance

DECA raises over $800 with winter themed dance. DJBJAY played a mix of dance music synced to a large light setup. There was a photo setup with a blue background and white Christmas trees where students could get their pictures taken with their dates or friends.

This December, the high school DECA team hosted the school’s annual semi formal. The event was a fundraiser for the DECA program.

DJBJAY played a mix of dance music synced to a large light setup. There was a photo setup with a blue background and white Christmas trees where students could get their pictures taken with their dates or friends.

With over 130 students participating, the DECA team successfully raised up to $800.

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NAHS builds giant gingerbread house

National Art Honor Society worked together to create a gingerbread house out of recycled cardboard and other art materials to celebrate the holidays.

National Art Honor Society met on Wednesday December 15 at 6:30 pm. They worked together to create one giant gingerbread house out of recycled cardboard and other art materials to celebrate the holidays. Everyone split up into three groups, with each group working on a section of the house. Eighth graders Tucker Evens and Sam Creighton helped NAHS adviser Caroline Epp to aseemble the cardboard house.

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Seventh graders read in Spanish to third graders

Seventh grade Spanish teacher Crystal Anthony brought her class over to Memorial Elementary School on Wednesday to share the books that they had created in Spanish.

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Chemistry students remove water from copper sulfate

Students in science teacher Keith Gray’s D block Honors chemistry class conducted a lab that consisted of heating a chemical and evaporating the water from it.

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PROFILE: Olivia Dumont, scholar and athlete

Dumont’s research to determine whether an extension of the uterine incision during a cesarean section is a risk for uterine rupture during the subsequent natural birth (or VBAC) was published in The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Senior Superstar Olivia Dumont is one to be recognized. Field hockey captain, Co-President of National Honor Society, and a published researcher, are only a few of the many accomplishments of this young woman.

Over the Summer, Dumont participated in and internship with Mass General Hospital in Boston, MA as a requirement of her ASR (Authentic Science Research) class. Her research to determine whether an extension of the uterine incision during a cesarean section is a risk for uterine rupture during the subsequent natural birth (or VBAC) was published in The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Dumont says she would like to be an obstetrician when she gets older and she stated that, “You get to be a part of the best day of someone’s life (when their child is born) every single day!” She saw cesarean sections being done and seeing it firsthand she said really helped with her research.

Along with her ASR accomplishments Dumont is a dedicated student and a part of many clubs, such as the green team, NHS, peer tutoring, Interact club, class office, debate, and band. She also plays field hockey and runs for the winter track team.

Her dedication to all of her activities shows and she tries to get to as many events as she can. Teachers and fellow students look to her as a role model and recognize her familiar face throughout the school and the community. Dumont will graduate this year and heading off to college in the fall and there is no doubt she will be missed by many of her friends and fellow classmates, along with the teacher and friends she leaves behind.

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High school students raise money for HAWC by raising Holiday spirit

A group of high school students, with the help of a few volunteers from HAWC (Healing Abuse Working for Change), hosted a holiday festival to raise money for the shelter. HAWC provides free, comprehensive services to victims of domestic violence and their children in the 23 cities and towns across the North Shore of Boston.

The high school students set up in the dining hall, providing multiple stations that children could go around to after paying a small fee to get in.  Each station had a different holiday themed craft to do, that the children could take home when they were finished.  

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Happy Holidays! Is being politically correct important? – Con

“Merry Christmas! Happy Hanukkah!” These few phrases are acceptable to say, however, playing any religious holiday music or performing any festivities surrounding a religious holiday is not allowed in school, in the hopes of remaining politically correct.

By Ellen Burgess

INDEPENDENT STAFF

  “Merry Christmas! Happy Hanukkah!” These few phrases are acceptable to say, however, playing any religious holiday music or performing any festivities surrounding a religious holiday is not allowed in school, in the hopes of remaining politically correct.

  Unfortunately for students, the school’s intolerance for music or other festivities is too strict throughout the holiday season.

  Holiday phrases are acceptable to say, but if the chorus tries to sing music specifically written about Christmas or another individual winter holiday, the school will not allow it to be done without incorporating another. Certain activities such as decorating lockers or performing religious festivities are also not acceptable.

  The school is public, meaning it is unacceptable to teach a specific religion; however, when holiday music is played, there is no intention to teach the specific religion, and students understand that.

    The school is also too strict about not allowing students to only recognize a single holiday. Although students are allowed to wear and represent their individual beliefs, students must also recognize that there is more than just one religious holiday. This should not be mandatory, as it does not bother many students.  

    “I don’t really care about people saying ‘Merry Christmas’ all the time; it’s not like it offends me,” Jewish junior Daria Shnider, said.

  Singing religious songs is also a tradition that should not be considered breaking the school rules. If the chorus would like to sing a song about Christmas, that song should be allowed because students of other religions do not mind the music.

  Assistant Principal Paul Murphy said that there can be “no religious songs because not everyone is Christian.”

  Students of other religions do not have a preference of whether other students do or do not recognize their own religious holiday.

  “It can be funny and annoying at the same time, but it doesn’t bother me as much as the school portrays it to,” Shnider said.

  Students realize that there are very different religious beliefs throughout the school and that their specific religion is not always the most widely celebrated. This does not harm or affect students in any way.

  As long as a specific religion is not being advocated during the holiday season, there should be no reason to remain politically correct in school.

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