MTV’s ‘World of Jenks’ encourages refutation of stereotyped groups

Different from the typical MTV shows such as “Jersey Shore,” “The Real World,” and “The Hills,” “World of Jenks” actually has the potential to change how people stereotype each other.

By Hannah Daley

INDEPENTENT EDITOR 

  Different from the typical MTV shows such as “Jersey Shore,” “The Real World,” and “The Hills,” “World of Jenks” actually has the potential to change how people stereotype each other.

  With the aspiration of showcasing different stories and perspectives of life, the 24-year-old filmmaker, Andrew Jenks, travels around the country, shadowing a generally misconceived person. Viewers may think they know the subject’s life; however, Jenks’ week-long experience with that person refutes their judgments.

  In the premiere episode Jenks delves into the life of rap superstar, Maino, who shows Jenks some of his typical hobbies, which consist of partying until he almost dies, performing at sold out shows, and visiting his impoverished childhood neighborhood in Brooklyn.

  Although viewers may surmise that Jenks merely shadows the subject of the episode, he actually becomes so passionate about living the reality of that person’s life that he gets in arguments.

  For example, Jenks and Maino quarrel when Jenks questions whether or not Maino knew that the people at his concert at whom he was cursing and flipping off consider him a role model.

  Along with getting a glimpse of a rapper’s life, Jenks also follows Chad, a 20-year-old living with autism, and helps him push his boundaries such as overcoming the nonstop noise of New York City.

  Throughout the rest of the season, Jenks will experience a variety of lifestyles, including that of a cage fighter, a poker player, an NFL cheerleader, an animal rescuer, and a homeless person.

  With a great soundtrack that includes artists from T.I. and Akon to Tokyo Police Club and the Spinto Band and a relaxed documentary style, the show provides an entertaining hour of stories that Jenks calls “personal but contain a message that is universal.”

  If you enjoyed the humor and sometimes solemnity in MTV’s “The Buried Life,” check out “World of Jenks” on Mondays at 10 p.m.

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Author: The Independent

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