MS Roller Palace gallery

Photos by Harriet Cheshire and Caroline Epp

On Friday Oct. 29, the middle school hosted an outing at Roller Palace in Beverly, MA.

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Fourth graders learn proper typing technique

In the Manchester Memorial School, 4th grade students practice their typing skills by using a computer program aimed to teach the correct way to type with accuracy and speed.

Photos by Jamie MacGregor and Willy DeConto

In the Manchester Memorial School, 4th grade students practice their typing skills by using a computer program aimed to teach the correct way to type with accuracy and speed. This familiarizes students with the placement of the keys. The students transcribed the words that they listened to on headphones. Students put paper over their hands to help learn where the letters are located on the keyboard. The class taught by Rebecca Baun.

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Students raise money for Afghani girls with music

The Barakat Club hosted an Acoustic Afternoon to raise money to put Afghani girls through high school.

Photos by Rachel Jones

The Barakat Club hosted an Acoustic Afternoon on Sunday, October 17th from 1-4pm at Masco Park. The school club raises money for the larger Barakat organization and is used to put Afghani girls through high school. The cost is five hundred dollars a year, and two thousand dollars for a full high school career. The group was very successful after their first fundraiser and was able to put one girl through high school. Bands and high school students performed the entire afternoon for the public. Entrance was free of charge, and the only profit was made through a raffle and donations. Many students, families, and locals attended, sitting in chairs and on blankets enjoying the performances.

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New photojournalism class creates MEMO website

With the idea that the community should be informed about daily activities in the school district, art teacher Caroline Epp created a new photo and video journalism class.

By Kaitlin McDonagh

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  With the idea that the community should be informed about daily activities in the school district, art teacher Caroline Epp created a new photo and video journalism class.

  The class is in charge of a new online magazine for which will show photos and videos of school-related events and will have links to The Independent, the school newspaper. The website, Manchester Essex Multimedia Online (MEMO), can be reached at www.memo.mersd.org.

  “MEMO is more visually based while [the paper] is more in-depth,” Epp said. “They are a good complement to each other.”

  According to Epp, the students will be reporting on the day-to-day events of the school district.

  “I like how the students have control of what goes up on the website for everyone else to see,” junior class member Aryanna Tiberii said.

  Before any content is published, students are focusing on taking news-worthy photos and writing correct captions. Students use their own or school cameras to cover their assigned events. When the class begins studying video journalism, students will use the school’s point and shoot camcorders.

  The main goal of the class is for the students to learn about the field of photo and video journalism and editing.

  According to Epp, the biggest challenge is trying to get the students to act like photojournalists.

  “[The students] are trying to balance not getting into people’s faces with wanting to get good shots,” she said.

  In order to combat this problem, Epp created MEMO press passes so people understand why the students are taking photos. “Hopefully they will give the kids more confidence to get what they need,” she said.

  The class originally started with eight students, but it “quickly swelled up,” according to Epp.

  Senior class member Maggie Cellucci said she joined the class because it seemed interesting and informative.

  “I love the class so far because it’s different than any other classes. It has a whole variety of people and is based more on aspects of art to capture an event more than with words,” she said.

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Spirit Week Gallery – Thursday Holidays

Photos by Maggie Cellucci, Jackie Rose, Nicole D’Ambrosio, and Caroline Epp. Additional photos courtesy of Chloe Gothie.

On Thursday of Spirit Week, each class dressed as a different holiday.

Photos by Maggie Cellucci, Jackie Rose, Nicole D’Ambrosio, and Caroline Epp.  Additional photos courtesy of Chloe Gothie.

On Thursday of Spirit Week, each class dressed as a different holiday.

Seniors: Halloween
Juniors: Winter holidays
Sophomores: Valentine’s Day
Freshmen: Fourth of July

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Kindergarten explores pumpkin life cycle

Librarian Samantha Silag provides a multisensory experience for kindergarteners at Memorial Elementary.

Photos by Erik Keefe and Will Glidden

For the day, kindergarten teacher Wendy Manninen’s class went to the library to learn about pumpkins for Halloween. The librarian Samantha Silag held one class period to read a book on the lifecycle of a pumpkin, discover the inside of a real pumpkin, and then finally make their own out of paper and other class materials. At the end of the day the students got to go home with their new pumpkins and also got to take with them the fun facts they learned that day.

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MTV’s ‘World of Jenks’ encourages refutation of stereotyped groups

Different from the typical MTV shows such as “Jersey Shore,” “The Real World,” and “The Hills,” “World of Jenks” actually has the potential to change how people stereotype each other.

By Hannah Daley

INDEPENTENT EDITOR 

  Different from the typical MTV shows such as “Jersey Shore,” “The Real World,” and “The Hills,” “World of Jenks” actually has the potential to change how people stereotype each other.

  With the aspiration of showcasing different stories and perspectives of life, the 24-year-old filmmaker, Andrew Jenks, travels around the country, shadowing a generally misconceived person. Viewers may think they know the subject’s life; however, Jenks’ week-long experience with that person refutes their judgments.

  In the premiere episode Jenks delves into the life of rap superstar, Maino, who shows Jenks some of his typical hobbies, which consist of partying until he almost dies, performing at sold out shows, and visiting his impoverished childhood neighborhood in Brooklyn.

  Although viewers may surmise that Jenks merely shadows the subject of the episode, he actually becomes so passionate about living the reality of that person’s life that he gets in arguments.

  For example, Jenks and Maino quarrel when Jenks questions whether or not Maino knew that the people at his concert at whom he was cursing and flipping off consider him a role model.

  Along with getting a glimpse of a rapper’s life, Jenks also follows Chad, a 20-year-old living with autism, and helps him push his boundaries such as overcoming the nonstop noise of New York City.

  Throughout the rest of the season, Jenks will experience a variety of lifestyles, including that of a cage fighter, a poker player, an NFL cheerleader, an animal rescuer, and a homeless person.

  With a great soundtrack that includes artists from T.I. and Akon to Tokyo Police Club and the Spinto Band and a relaxed documentary style, the show provides an entertaining hour of stories that Jenks calls “personal but contain a message that is universal.”

  If you enjoyed the humor and sometimes solemnity in MTV’s “The Buried Life,” check out “World of Jenks” on Mondays at 10 p.m.

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New trainer passes knowledge to athletes

A recent graduate from Endicott College, Carl Gentile now fills the position of athletic trainer.

By Rebecca Lynch

INDEPENDENT EDITOR

  A recent graduate from Endicott College, Carl Gentile now fills the position of athletic trainer.

  According to Gentile, he received other offers including North Reading and a couple New York schools, but he felt most comfortable here.

  “I really like it. The kids are good, and the staff and coaches are all nice. It’s great to be in a new facility,” he said.

Gentile studied physical therapy at Endicott College and participated in internships at Harmeling Physical Therapy and Sports Med North.

  Athletes appreciate his educational background.

  “He’s a very good trainer. He’s knowledgeable and really knows what he’s talking about,” junior Eliza Rohner said.

  According to Gentile, his interest in physical therapy stemmed from a love of sports. His favorite sport to watch is football, and he played hockey and baseball in high school.

  “I actually blew my shoulder in high school, and I had to go through extensive rehab for that. The process sparked my interest in physical therapy,” Gentile said.

  Although he enjoys physical therapy, Gentile said he is continuing his education in hopes to eventually become a physician’s assistant.

  In the trainer room, Gentile’s personality has made an immediate impact.

  “He’s friendly and laid back. It makes going to the trainer effortless,” junior Aryanna Tiberii said.

  “The knowledge and comfort level he offers makes everyone trust him more,” freshman Rachel Daley said.

  Gentile has treated many athletes so far.

  Tiberii, a soccer player, received a concussion during a game earlier this season.

  “[Gentile] was able to diagnose my concussion right away. He told me exactly what I needed to do to heal and I was able to play again in a couple weeks,” she said.

  Rohner, also a soccer player, experienced hip tendonitis last year, and it carried over to this year. The tendonitis requires daily treatment.

  “The transition from last year and this year was very easy. [Gentile] does all of the same treatments that I went through before, but he added some of his own which have helped a lot!” she said.

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New fire drill solves crowd issues, improves student safety

Small, organized groups with advisers on turf relieve chaos, confusion

By Morgan Kennedy

INDEPENDENT STAFF 

 Recent changes to the fire drill system have created an easy and organized evacuation plan for emergency situations.  The new system requires students to exit the building at the sound of the alarm and walk to the football field.

  Under the old system, most students exited the building into the upper parking lot, where they pushed each other through parked cars to get to the back of the lot. The enclosed, spacious football field relieves this chaos and congestion.

  On the field, students split up and report to assigned positions according to yard lines where they meet their adviser along with nine other students.

  Teachers are in charge of 10 students, rather than an entire class, making it easier to keep track of students and recognize who is missing.

  According to Principal James Lee, once students report to their assigned positions on the field, four teachers circulate with a master attendance list. The attendance list makes its way to each group where the adviser holds a sign informing whether or not all students in the group are accounted for.

  If a student is missing, the attendance list will tell whether he or she needs to be located or is absent from school. In the case of an absent adviser, one of the four teachers with the master attendance list checks the group for missing students.

  The small entrance gate on the field causes some difficulty in quickly getting students away from the building.

According to Lee, the faculty is currently working on solving this problem. They are looking into the possibility of installing one large gate to accommodate more students at one time.

  The new system allows to easily account for students in lunch or in the library who may be without a teacher.          

  The new drill also improves safety conditions by clearing the parking lot for fire engines and emergency vehicles.

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