Seventh grade English class interprets A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Every year, Abby Whittrege’s seventh grade English class studies Shakespeare’s comedy A Midsummmer Night’s Drean as part of their drama unit. This is one of the essential rites of passages for children at MERMS, and stands out in the minds of many older students as one of their favorite memories of middle school.

Two copies of A Midsummer Night’s Dream sit next to one another. The copy on the left contains the complete and unabridged original text, while the copy on the right adds a modern translation that any English speaker can understand. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is about the marriage of Theseus, duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons. Four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors (called “mechanicals”) are controlled and manipulated by the faeries who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set. Whittredge has been teaching the play for over fifteen years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Two copies of A Midsummer Night’s Dream sit next to one another. The copy on the left contains the complete and unabridged original text, while the copy on the right adds a modern translation that any English speaker can understand. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is about the marriage of Theseus, duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons. Four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors (called “mechanicals”) are controlled and manipulated by the faeries who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set. Whittredge has been teaching the play for over fifteen years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shortly after beginning the play, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class created blackout poems. They took pages from copies that were about to be destroyed and blacked out lines from the play so all that is left is what the viewer can read, adding in their own artwork and designs. This is just one of many activities Whittredge uses with her students in class. “We act the play out as we read,” she says. “Some of the kids are actors, some of them are directors. There are also set designers, costume designers, coreographers. A few of my students even create musical compositions for each scene. When we’re finished, each group picks the one scene they like the best and perform it in front of the whole class.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Shortly after beginning A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class created blackout poems. They took pages from copies that were about to be destroyed and blacked out lines from the play so all that is left is what the viewer can read, adding in their own artwork and designs. This is just one of many activities Whittredge uses with her students in class. “We act the play out as we read,” she says. “Some of the kids are actors, some of them are directors. There are also set designers, costume designers, coreographers. A few of my students even create musical compositions for each scene. When we’re finished, each group picks the one scene they like the best and perform it in front of the whole class.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In class, seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge tells her students what will happen in the next scene of A Midsummer Night’s Dream while the class follows along in their copies of the play. William Shakespeare is known to have written at least thirty-five plays during his lifetime. Of all the comedies, tragedies, and histories in the Bard’s oeuvre, Whittredge teaches A Midsummer Night’s Dream because she thinks it is a great play for middle schoolers. “It’s funny, it’s confusing, it’s silly, and it’s crazy,” she said. “It’s everything seventh graders love. The tragedies, they’re a lot harder for them, so I think the comedies are the way to go with the middle school.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In class, seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge tells her students what will happen in the next scene of A Midsummer Night’s Dream while the class follows along in their copies of the play. William Shakespeare is known to have written at least thirty-five plays during his lifetime. Of all the comedies, tragedies, and histories in the Bard’s oeuvre, Whittredge teaches A Midsummer Night’s Dream because she thinks it is a great play for middle schoolers. “It’s funny, it’s confusing, it’s silly, and it’s crazy,” she said. “It’s everything seventh graders love. The tragedies, they’re a lot harder for them, so I think the comedies are the way to go with the middle school.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once she has given them her scene overview, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English students read the scene to their classmates. Whittredge divides each of her classes into smaller groups, each consisting of the same people who worked on the picture book project from earlier in the drama unit. “I assign them their roles in the play, and each person plays a different character,” they said. “But when a character isn’t on stage acting, then they have other jobs. I ask, ‘who’s never been a director, who’s never been a set designer, who’s never been a composer? Who’s never done choreography or costume design?’ And then they read the whole scene of the play that we’re in with the mindset of a set designer or a member of the stage crew, something along those lines. They still have to read the play, but they’re reading it like a support member of the cast, not an actual actor.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once she has given them her scene overview, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English students read the scene to their classmates. Whittredge divides each of her classes into smaller groups, each consisting of the same people who worked on the picture book project from earlier in the drama unit. “I assign them their roles in the play, and each person plays a different character,” they said. “But when a character isn’t on stage acting, then they have other jobs. I ask, ‘who’s never been a director, who’s never been a set designer, who’s never been a composer? Who’s never done choreography or costume design?’ And then they read the whole scene of the play that we’re in with the mindset of a set designer or a member of the stage crew, something along those lines. They still have to read the play, but they’re reading it like a support member of the cast, not an actual actor.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After they have read through their scene, actors, directors, set designers, costume designers, coreographers, and composers in Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class decide how they will act it out. This year at MERMS, five members of Shakespeare & Company, a theatre troupe based in Lenox, hosted theatre workshops for grades six through eight. According to Whittredge, this change affected her curriculum tremendously. “I think the kids were really excited about Shakespeare,” she said. “I think they always are, they love him. But I think this year, they were less intimidated by him. They thought reading him would be more fun, and they couldn’t have been more right.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After they have read through their scene, actors, directors, set designers, costume designers, coreographers, and composers in Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class decide how they will act it out. This year at MERMS, five members of Shakespeare & Company, a theatre troupe based in Lenox, hosted theatre workshops for grades six through eight. According to Whittredge, this change affected her curriculum tremendously. “I think the kids were really excited about Shakespeare,” she said. “I think they always are, they love him. But I think this year, they were less intimidated by him. They thought reading him would be more fun, and they couldn’t have been more right.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In the seventh grade pod, each group in Abby Whittredge’s English class performs their scene in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When asked about how her students react to the unit, Whittredge said, “They always love Shakespeare, because they love acting out the play and generally not sitting down. They love directing, they love costumes, they love set design… I think they like the whole thing. Most of what we do involves getting up and participating. It’s not just sitting down and writing something. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In the seventh grade pod, each group in Abby Whittredge’s English class performs their scene in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When asked about how her students react to the unit, Whittredge said, “They always love Shakespeare, because they love acting out the play and generally not sitting down. They love directing, they love costumes, they love set design… I think they like the whole thing. Most of what we do involves getting up and participating. It’s not just sitting down and writing something. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Once each group has presented their scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class watches a film adaptation of the play. Whittredge’s favorite part about teaching the play is when she sees her students have “that moment where they understand what’s going on, where they get it, and they laugh at the jokes without me telling them.” She also loves “getting to see the talents of kids who maybe aren’t always as good at English, and all of a sudden, you get to see that they’re maybe good at Shakespeare and they’re good at acting! They’re great directors! They’re fantastic artists! I just learn so many things about them that I don’t get to see all the time.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Once each group has presented their scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class watches a film adaptation of the play. Whittredge’s favorite part about teaching the play is when she sees her students have “that moment where they understand what’s going on, where they get it, and they laugh at the jokes without me telling them.” She also loves “getting to see the talents of kids who maybe aren’t always as good at English, and all of a sudden, you get to see that they’re maybe good at Shakespeare and they’re good at acting! They’re great directors! They’re fantastic artists! I just learn so many things about them that I don’t get to see all the time.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Senior Manages School Garden for Score Project

Every year seniors in the graduating class leave fourth quarter for S.C.O.R.E. projects. Senior Jackson Haskell decided he wanted to maintain the school garden. Every few days each week Haskell goes outside to maintain and check on the garden. Haskell is attending Gordon College in the Fall of 2015.

The school garden  across from the turf field grows the vegetables for school lunches. Senior Jackson Haskell maintained the garden for his senior Score Project. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The school garden across from the turf field grows the vegetables for school lunches. Senior Jackson Haskell maintained the garden for his senior Score Project. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The garden grows a variety of different vegetables in boxes between the gym floor area and by the turf field. Cabbage, lettuce, and other organic food are grown. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The garden grows a variety of different vegetables in boxes between the gym floor area and by the turf field. Cabbage, lettuce, and other organic food are grown. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In one of the garden boxes a hose is attached to a watering pipe. The pipe is put at the bottom of the soil to keep the plants watered without having to go outside and water them by hand every day. Head Custodian Steve Hunt built this device.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
In one of the garden boxes a hose is attached to a watering pipe. The pipe is put at the bottom of the soil to keep the plants watered without having to go outside and water them by hand every day. Head Custodian Steve Hunt built this device. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Haskell explains the function and purpose of the watering device and how it is beneficial to the school. He goes outside every few days to make sure the plants are staying hydrated and growing at a normal pace. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Haskell explains the function and purpose of the watering device and how it is beneficial to the school. He goes outside every few days to make sure the plants are staying hydrated and growing at a normal pace. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Haskell explains the function and purpose of the watering device and how it is beneficial to the school. He goes outside every few days to make sure the plants are staying hydrated and growing at a normal pace. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Haskell explains the function and purpose of the watering device and how it is beneficial to the school. He goes outside every few days to make sure the plants are staying hydrated and growing at a normal pace. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Around week two of his project, plants sprouted with more color. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Around week two of his project, plants sprouted with more color. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After just a few weeks, the vegetables in the garden have sprouted to full size and were finally able to be eaten. Haskell worked hard on preparing the garden and watching over it carefully throughout the few weeks of his SCORE project. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
After just a few weeks, the vegetables in the garden have sprouted to full size and were finally able to be eaten. Haskell worked hard on preparing the garden and watching over it carefully throughout the few weeks of his SCORE project.  Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

 

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Memorial Day Assembly

On Friday May 22nd, Manchester Essex middle and high school came together for a school wide assembly. The annual Memorial Day assembly was held in the gym with guest speaker and Congressman Seth Moulton. Moulton spoke about his time serving in the military, and his time in politics.

High school band members prepare for the Star Spangled Banner in the beginning of the assembly. Band director Joe Sokol goes over again the list of songs the students will be playing that day for the assembly. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
High school band members prepare for the Star Spangled Banner in the beginning of the assembly. Band director Joe Sokol goes over again the list of songs the students will be playing that day for the assembly. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Congressmen and veteran Seth Moulton walks in the gym with Word War II veteran Larry Kirby. Kirby is over 90 years old and enlisted in the army when he was only 18 years old, the same age as some of the seniors in the gym today. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Congressmen and veteran Seth Moulton walks in the gym with Word War II veteran Larry Kirby. Kirby is over 90 years old and enlisted in the army when he was only 18 years old, the same age as some of the seniors in the gym today. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Band members begin to play The Star Spangled Banner in the beginning of the assembly. The brass section of the band is in the front row of the instruments, for the best sound. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Band members begin to play The Star Spangled Banner in the beginning of the assembly. The brass section of the band is in the front row of the instruments, for the best sound. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Moulton speaks about his experiences during war, and what it was like for him to enlist. Moulton spoke about what it was like to serve, and how it changed him as a person.  Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Moulton speaks about his experiences during war, and what it was like for him to enlist. Moulton spoke about what it was like to serve, and how it changed him as a person. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the chorus sang several songs. Their first song performed was On This Day, conducted by chorus director Donna O’Neil. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the chorus sang several songs. Their first song performed was On This Day, conducted by chorus director Donna O’Neil. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the audience watched intently to the speakers and their experiences. Students stood and gave Moulton a standing ovation to his speech about serving in the military. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the audience watched intently to the speakers and their experiences. Students stood and gave Moulton a standing ovation to his speech about serving in the military. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the band wait patiently for the assembly to begin. The back row of the band it the percussion section, with all the drums and symbols. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the band wait patiently for the assembly to begin. The back row of the band it the percussion section, with all the drums and symbols. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the band wait patiently for the assembly to begin. The back row of the band it the percussion section, with all the drums and symbols. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Students in the band wait patiently for the assembly to begin. The back row of the band it the percussion section, with all the drums and symbols. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
World War II veteran Larry Kirby stands and waves to the crowd as he is introduced. Kirby has been actively working throughout his 90 years. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
World War II veteran Larry Kirby stands and waves to the crowd as he is introduced. Kirby has been actively working throughout his 90 years. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Principal Paul Murphy introduces all the veterans who were able to come to the assembly. From Right to left: William Bell, George Nickless, Arthur Secher, and Starr Lloyd. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Principal Paul Murphy introduces all the veterans who were able to come to the assembly. From Right to left: William Bell, George Nickless, Arthur Secher, and Starr Lloyd. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in the Sound Waves acapella group performed Let Freedom Ring. The Sound Waves perform at many school wide events and community events. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Students in the Sound Waves acapella group performed Let Freedom Ring. The Sound Waves perform at many school wide events and community events. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The veterans wait and listen patiently while the high school band performs the Marines Hymn, Air force Hymn, and Navy Hymn. The band performed a total of seven songs, along with the entire March Set. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
The veterans wait and listen patiently while the high school band performs the Marines Hymn, Air force Hymn, and Navy Hymn. The band performed a total of seven songs, along with the entire March Set. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Moulton speaks about his work in democracy. Moulton talked about his work ethic and how it was to serve in the military. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Moulton speaks about his work in democracy. Moulton talked about his work ethic and how it was to serve in the military. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
15.Sokol receives a school wide standing ovation. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
15. Sokol receives a school wide standing ovation. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
At the end of the assembly, Assistant Principal Paul Murphy gave a special speech to band director Joe Sokol. It is Sokols last year at Manchester Essex, and he has been here for over 30 years. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
At the end of the assembly, Assistant Principal Paul Murphy gave a special speech to band director Joe Sokol. It is Sokols last year at Manchester Essex, and he has been here for over 30 years. Credit: Ainsley McLaughlin for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Moulton speaks to teachers and administrators after the assembly. Health teacher Janda Ricci-Munn speaks to Moulton about his work here at Manchester Essex. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Moulton speaks to teachers and administrators after the assembly. Health teacher Janda Ricci-Munn speaks to Moulton about his work here at Manchester Essex. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
History and Government teacher Jen Coleman introduces her AP Government class to Congressman Seth Moulton. The class is full of juniors and seniors interested in politics and in government. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
History and Government teacher Jen Coleman introduces her AP Government class to Congressman Seth Moulton. The class is full of juniors and seniors interested in politics and in government. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

Teachers introduce themselves after the assembly to Moulton. Spanish teacher Robbie Bilsbury introduces himself to Moulton. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.
Teachers introduce themselves after the assembly to Moulton. Spanish teacher Robbie Bilsbury introduces himself to Moulton. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online.

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MERMS holds spring concert

On May 15th, the middle school band and chorus held the spring concert. Chorus teacher Donna O’Neill conducted the 6th, 7th and 8th grade chorus concert. Band director Joseph Sokol conducted the middle school band concert. This is Sokol’s last year teaching and this was his last middle school concert.

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Sixth grade chorus students begin to file onto the risers to begin the MERMS spring concert. Their first song was Gute Nacht, a German folk song. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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A middle school student helps Betsy Vicks, the accompanist turn the pages while she plays the piano. Vicks was the accompanist for all the choruses. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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The sixth grade middle school chorus performs the song ‘Round the Riverside. The song was arranged by Saundra Musser. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Band students set the stage before the getting their instruments. They began the concert with The Star Spangled Banner. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Band director Joseph Sokol conducts the song March Triumphant. He has been teaching music for 30+ years. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
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Joseph Sokol announces the next song will be Over the Rainbow. The song is originally from the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. Credit: Cole Bourbon for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Seventh grade English class learns about theatre through the art of the picture book

Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class is currently doing a unit on drama. In order to introduce her students to the basics of theatre, she divides them into groups and has them work together to each act out a different picture book.

Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge welcomes her students to the auditorium on the day her students present their projects. Whittredge has been using picture books in her drama unit for about four years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge welcomes her students to the auditorium on the day her students present their projects. Whittredge has been using picture books in her drama unit for about four years. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The first group of students to present performs their rendition of Margaret Wise Brown’s bedtime classic Goodnight Moon. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge organizes the project by putting her students in groups of three or four by their abilities in front of a group. “Shy kids are always with shy kids,” she said, “and loud kids are all together. Medium kids are all together. The reason why is because I don’t want the loud kids to take over all the groups. I want them to know what it’s like to work with kids who are like them. I want quiet kids not to stand behind other people who are not comfortable on stage. I want everybody to learn how to compromise if you’re one of the vocal people, to learn how to accept other people’s ideas, or to shut up and listen. And the quiet kids need to learn how to take charge.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The first group of students to present performs their rendition of Margaret Wise Brown’s bedtime classic Goodnight Moon. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge organizes the project by putting her students in groups of three or four by their abilities in front of a group. “Shy kids are always with shy kids,” she said, “and loud kids are all together. Medium kids are all together. The reason why is because I don’t want the loud kids to take over all the groups. I want them to know what it’s like to work with kids who are like them. I want quiet kids not to stand behind other people who are not comfortable on stage. I want everybody to learn how to compromise if you’re one of the vocal people, to learn how to accept other people’s ideas, or to shut up and listen. And the quiet kids need to learn how to take charge.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The next group of students uses props, singing, and dancing to reenact Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, a book written by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambeault and illustrated by Louis Elhert that teaches the alphabet. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge assigns the book she wants each group to use. “They memorize the book as an actor,” she said. “Then, as a director, they have a vision for what it’s going to look like on stage. Then, they do the choreography where they block it all out, and they also do the costumes and everything.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The next group of students uses props, singing, and dancing to reenact Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, a book written by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambeault and illustrated by Louis Elhert that teaches the alphabet. Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge assigns the book she wants each group to use. “They memorize the book as an actor,” she said. “Then, as a director, they have a vision for what it’s going to look like on stage. Then, they do the choreography where they block it all out, and they also do the costumes and everything.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Another group in seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge’s class acts out Snuggle Puppy by Sandra Boynton. In preparation for the project, Whittredge introduces her students to several important elements of drama, including projection, annunciation, eye contact, and voice inflection. She also teaches her students about looking at the audience, projecting one’s voice, speaking clearly, and how to change one’s voice to create a tone. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Another group in seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge’s class acts out Snuggle Puppy by Sandra Boynton. In preparation for the project, Whittredge introduces her students to several important elements of drama, including projection, annunciation, eye contact, and voice inflection. She also teaches her students about looking at the audience, projecting one’s voice, speaking clearly, and how to change one’s voice to create a tone. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge chooses a different set of books for each of her classes. For the block being photographed, she selected Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy E. Shaw, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, Goodnight Moon (both already mentioned), and, written by Sandra Boynton, Moo! Baa! La La La!, Hippos Go Berserk, Snuggle Puppy, and The Barnyard Dance, performed by the group shown above. Whittredge chooses the books based on what her son loved when he was younger. She also has a master’s degree in children’s literature, and tries to keep up with the new trends in picture books in order to add new things to her list. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Seventh grade English teacher Abby Whittredge chooses a different set of books for each of her classes. For the block being photographed, she selected Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy E. Shaw, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, Goodnight Moon (both already mentioned), and, written by Sandra Boynton, Moo! Baa! La La La!, Hippos Go Berserk, Snuggle Puppy, and The Barnyard Dance, performed by the group shown above. Whittredge chooses the books based on what her son loved when he was younger. She also has a master’s degree in children’s literature, and tries to keep up with the new trends in picture books in order to add new things to her list. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The last group to present their performance stages Moo! Baa! La La La! in front of Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class. The picture book project is the beginning of Whittredge’s Shakespeare unit. “I teach them all the hard stuff – projection, annunciation, voice inflection, those things – with something simple and easy like a picture book,” she said. “If you can do it with a picture book, you learn it on something easy, then you can transfer it to something hard, like Shakespeare.” The project is worth several participation grades, and the performance acts as a quiz. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The last group to present their performance stages Moo! Baa! La La La! in front of Abby Whittredge’s seventh grade English class. The picture book project is the beginning of Whittredge’s Shakespeare unit. “I teach them all the hard stuff – projection, annunciation, voice inflection, those things – with something simple and easy like a picture book,” she said. “If you can do it with a picture book, you learn it on something easy, then you can transfer it to something hard, like Shakespeare.” The project is worth several participation grades, and the performance acts as a quiz. Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

As her seventh grade English class watches their fellow students perform, Abby Whittredge grades each group’s project. Student feedback has been extremely positive every year Whittredge has used the project in her classroom. “Everybody loves it, and I’m always shocked at how good they are,” she said. “Very few people get less than a B-plus, because they work really hard! And not because I’m an easy grader, it’s because they work so hard to do a good job.” Whittredge’s favorite part of the project is seeing her students demonstrate their creativity. “They’ll take something that I think ought to look a certain way, and they’ll change it, and do something way cooler than I ever thought about doing. And it looks awesome and it’s so smart and good, and it’s just a way for me to see them in a different light.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As her seventh grade English class watches their fellow students perform, Abby Whittredge grades each group’s project. Student feedback has been extremely positive every year Whittredge has used the project in her classroom. “Everybody loves it, and I’m always shocked at how good they are,” she said. “Very few people get less than a B-plus, because they work really hard! And not because I’m an easy grader, it’s because they work so hard to do a good job.” Whittredge’s favorite part of the project is seeing her students demonstrate their creativity. “They’ll take something that I think ought to look a certain way, and they’ll change it, and do something way cooler than I ever thought about doing. And it looks awesome and it’s so smart and good, and it’s just a way for me to see them in a different light.” Credit: Benjamin Willems for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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Varsity Lacrosse Bonds Over Team Dinner

Monday May 11th student athletes on the Manchester Essex Varsity girl’s lacrosse team had a team dinner, hosted by players Liddy and Annie DeConto before their game against Masconomet High School. The dinner’s theme was “American Barbeque.” Pulled pork, salad, corn bread, and fruit was on the menu for the evening.

Senior and sophomore mother Lisa DeConto prepared a large salad with vegetables and croutons. Players contribute to the team dinner by helping clean after and bringing beverages. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Senior and sophomore mother Lisa DeConto prepared a large salad with vegetables and croutons. Players contribute to the team dinner by helping clean after and bringing beverages. Credit: Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Players had many servings of the pulled pork along with corn bread, and watermelon. For desert there was lemon cake, marble cake, and coconut cake. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Players had many servings of the pulled pork along with corn bread, and watermelon. For desert there was lemon cake, marble cake, and coconut cake. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The players raced to the serving table to get in line for their food. The Team is in a 6 and 5 season, and would need one more win to get them to the tournament. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The players raced to the serving table to get in line for their food. The Team is in a 6 and 5 season, and would need one more win to get them to the tournament. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As they served themselves others went into the kitchen to sit and eat. The practice was a lot of running and working hard, and the food was a great reward. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
As they served themselves others went into the kitchen to sit and eat. The practice was a lot of running and working hard, and the food was a great reward. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Bridgett Kiernan talks with Lisa DeConto about the delicious food and her game plan for the game the next day. Kiernan included senior Annie DeConto in the conversation. DeConto is a low attacker and Kiernan is a mid-fielder. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomore Bridgett Kiernan talks with Lisa DeConto about the delicious food and her game plan for the game the next day. Kiernan included senior Annie DeConto in the conversation. DeConto is a low attacker and Kiernan is a mid-fielder. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The team poses for a picture. After the team picture, music began to play and everyone began to dance around the kitchen. The captains for the team are Seniors Maya Heath and Katie Furber. Heath is a midfielder, attacker, and defender, Furber is the goalie.  Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
The team poses for a picture. After the team picture, music began to play and everyone began to dance around the kitchen. The captains for the team are Seniors Maya Heath and Katie Furber. Heath is a midfielder, attacker, and defender, Furber is the goalie. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bella Mastendino enjoys her lemon cake dessert. Mastendino is a starting low defender.  Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Junior Bella Mastendino enjoys her lemon cake dessert. Mastendino is a starting low defender. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

Sophomores DeConto and Kiernan practice dance moves in the kitchen. Square dancing and practicing the team dance were the main dance moves during the dinner. The game against Masco was a sad loss, and the girls will be playing Beverly the following Monday. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online
Sophomores DeConto and Kiernan practice dance moves in the kitchen. Square dancing and practicing the team dance were the main dance moves during the dinner. The game against Masco was a sad loss, and the girls will be playing Beverly the following Monday. Jenny Beardsley for Manchester Essex Multimedia Online

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